#1
Alright guys, a few years ago, a friend of mine who was made awesome synth music introduced me to FL Studio. He showed me how to operate the basics of the program and I really enjoyed how simple everything seemed to be. Well, I've been dicking around in the program since then, but I recently got myself a very nice rig and I want to get VERY serious about recording. As in, I want to make it my career if possible. I am a rock/metal musician, and I consider myself to be an intermediate player. I want to eventually produce professional or near professional sounding tracks (something like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9wwnQez0yE&fb_source=message). But most places I've read on the internet says "FL Studio is definitely not the DAW you want to use, especially for rock!" Ok, I can respect that, but I need to know: Is that an elitist opinion, or is that statement grounded in fact? Like I've said, I already have a decent foothold in navigating FL Studio, so it would be a bit of a detour to get into a new DAW. But I'm willing to do anything it takes.

After figuring out which DAW I want to use, I need to find a general guide on audio production. I mean, I need something that starts at the very bottom, takes NOTHING for granted when explaining things, and treats me like the complete idiot that I am when it comes to audio production. There is no limit to how much I will read to learn this stuff. Where do you guys recommend I start? I see all these nice tutorials and stuff, but they're always very specific and I never know how to actually APPLY them.

I learn best with EXAMPLES. If I could find a guide that says something like "If you hear *this* (with a sound file) in your mix, then you have an imbalance in this and this, and you should apply a compressor with these settings blah blah blah." Are there any learning sources that teach with examples?

Also, I have an M-Audio Fast Track USB for DI, and I use Amplitube 3, and Superior Drummer. I've been able to make a few songs, but as you can tell, the production is completely amateur:

http://soundcloud.com/sample246/untitled-1-1

http://soundcloud.com/sample246/untitled-2
Last edited by Sample246 at Feb 21, 2012,
#2
I use fl studio, there a a few thinks that they could change to make my more real instrument/ recording friendly. and its odd time sig support totally sucks. But its one of the easier to do midi work/routing in (I see you use Superior drummer). But was with any thing the DAW is just a tool, its your skill that really matter.

You can do rock/metal in fl studio, but its just remember. Know what you are writing, You will have to know your time signatures, and how odd ones will relate to a 4/4 grid system that can't be changed. This usually ain't a problem for most rock, as it is in 4/4.

Also, as a tip, if using Fl with superior drummer, route the channels( superior drummer's) to mixer channels (FL), or do all you drum mixing right inside of superior drummer. Reason for this is that you will not be able to bounce the tracks to audio, in song that changed tempo. Its a pain trust me.

That all I can say really, Is that I do it, and with Prog metal/rock. So It can be done, but you will have to know your program, and your written song better. Which in all reality is never a bad thing
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Last edited by targetdude at Feb 21, 2012,
#3
A lot of the FL "not to be used for anything but electronic and hip hop" stems back to when it was still called "Fruity Loops" and was just a sequencer. Even in Fruity Loops 6 audio clip recording was kinda sketch., one of the reasons they changed to "FL Studio" instead of "Fruity Loops" is because of the bad rep they use to have for audio clip recording. FL 9 and FL 10 are both very capable DAWs. I have recorded many different genres in FL, mostly rock. I love it. I think it makes way more since then most DAWs (shortcuts, layouts, mixer routing, etc.), although I am in the minority, since it is set up different than almost all DAWs.

With all that said I recommend Reaper. FL maybe my favorite but I believe everyone should be familiar with a more "classic" style DAW, such as Reaper, Cubase, Pro Tools ,etc. While they all diff a bit from each other, they are similar in many aspects. Those aspects are very different from FL. Knowing something like Reaper, Cubase, etc. will help you more if you want to work with other artists.

There is no best DAW. As for tutorials try youtube tutorials to learn about compression and such if you want audio examples. Make sure you listen in HD.
Last edited by FireHawk at Feb 21, 2012,
#4
I forgot to mention, if you buy FL studio, you get free update for life to the version you own, as well as if you some day get a better program for instruments you record. You can (depending on the DAW) Run FL studio as a VST within it.
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#5
Quote by targetdude
I use fl studio, there a a few thinks that they could change to make my more real instrument/ recording friendly. and its odd time sig support totally sucks. But its one of the easier to do midi work/routing in (I see you use Superior drummer). But was with any thing the DAW is just a tool, its your skill that really matter.

You can do rock/metal in fl studio, but its just remember. Know what you are writing, You will have to know your time signatures, and how odd ones will relate to a 4/4 grid system that can't be changed. This usually ain't a problem for most rock, as it is in 4/4.

Also, as a tip, if using Fl with superior drummer, route the channels( superior drummer's) to mixer channels (FL), or do all you drum mixing right inside of superior drummer. Reason for this is that you will not be able to bounce the tracks to audio, in song that changed tempo. Its a pain trust me.

That all I can say really, Is that I do it, and with Prog metal/rock. So It can be done, but you will have to know your program, and your written song better. Which in all reality is never a bad thing


Alright. But here's the thing. I don't understand recording. At all. The only thing I know, is how to do the bare minimum to put together a song on FL Studio. Like, maybe I'm just doing stuff and I don't realize what I'm doing, because I see other people talking about doing stuff in different DAW's, and they always start stuff with "Create a mono or stereo track." Like, I THINK I MIGHT know what this means, but not really. I don't have to "create a track" in FL studio. I just record something in the built in Edison program, then drag the recording to the playlist, or make play with the piano roll, and drag it to the playlist. I feel like I'm not fully understanding the process here, which is what I WANT to do. I feel like I'm sitting at the controls of a spacecraft, and I've figured exactly what buttons to press and when to press them in order to achieve one desired outcome, and then people say "oh you know what you're doing" BUT I DON'T! lol. I need someone, or some guide to explain this stuff to me bit by bit. Like, an Idiots Guide to Digital Audio Production or something.
#6
Quote by Sample246
Alright. But here's the thing. I don't understand recording. At all. The only thing I know, is how to do the bare minimum to put together a song on FL Studio. Like, maybe I'm just doing stuff and I don't realize what I'm doing, because I see other people talking about doing stuff in different DAW's, and they always start stuff with "Create a mono or stereo track." Like, I THINK I MIGHT know what this means, but not really. I don't have to "create a track" in FL studio. I just record something in the built in Edison program, then drag the recording to the playlist, or make play with the piano roll, and drag it to the playlist. I feel like I'm not fully understanding the process here, which is what I WANT to do. I feel like I'm sitting at the controls of a spacecraft, and I've figured exactly what buttons to press and when to press them in order to achieve one desired outcome, and then people say "oh you know what you're doing" BUT I DON'T! lol. I need someone, or some guide to explain this stuff to me bit by bit. Like, an Idiots Guide to Digital Audio Production or something.


For recording tracks in FL I highly recommend recording to the playlist and not Edison, it simplifies everything in the long run once you learn more.

Which every DAW you pick you should try video tutorials of the DAW you are using. Like if you using FL Studio, don't watch Reaper tutorials. If your using Reaper, don't watch Pro Tools tutorials. It takes a while to learn everything. Try to find those beginner guides.

If you have any specific FL Studio questions I can help you.
Last edited by FireHawk at Feb 21, 2012,
#7
Quote by FireHawk
A lot of the FL "not to be used for anything but electronic and hip hop" stems back to when it was still called "Fruity Loops" and was just a sequencer. Even in Fruity Loops 6 audio clip recording was kinda sketch., one of the reasons they changed to "FL Studio" instead of "Fruity Loops" is because of the bad rep they use to have for audio clip recording. FL 9 and FL 10 are both very capable DAWs. I have recorded many different genres in FL, mostly rock. I love it. I think it makes way more since then most DAWs (shortcuts, layouts, mixer routing, etc.), although I am in the minority, since it is set up different than almost all DAWs.

With all that said I recommend Reaper. FL maybe my favorite but I believe everyone should be familiar with a more "classic" style DAW, such as Reaper, Cubase, Pro Tools ,etc. Why they all diff a bit from each other they are similar in many aspects. Those aspects are very different from FL. Knowing something like Reaper, Cubase, etc. will help you more if you want to work with other artists.

There is no best DAW. As for tutorials try youtube tutorials to learn about compression and such if you want audio examples. Make sure you listen in HD.


So you recommend I use Reaper ALSO just for the experience? What is this "classic" style, and how is FL Studio different? And you say to look up youtube tutorials, but where do I begin? Are there any good "Absolute Beginners Guide to getting started in Audio Production" videos that you know of?

I forgot to mention, if you buy FL studio, you get free update for life to the version you own, as well as if you some day get a better program for instruments you record. You can (depending on the DAW) Run FL studio as a VST within it.


Curious as to how loading a whole DAW into another DAW as a VST would be beneficial. That kinda sounds like plugging one car into another one....
#8
Quote by FireHawk
For recording tracks in FL I highly recommend recording to the playlist and not Edison, it simplifies everything in the long run once you learn more.

Which every DAW you pick you should try video tutorials of the DAW you are using. Like if you using FL Studio, don't watch Reaper tutorials. If your using Reaper, don't watch Pro Tools tutorials. It takes a while to learn everything. Try to find those beginner guides.

If you have any specific FL Studio questions I can help you.


Alright, would you happen to know of the best FL Studio tutorials, perhaps some geared towards rock musicians?
#9
Quote by Sample246
So you recommend I use Reaper ALSO just for the experience? What is this "classic" style, and how is FL Studio different? And you say to look up youtube tutorials, but where do I begin? Are there any good "Absolute Beginners Guide to getting started in Audio Production" videos that you know of?


If you learn FL I think you should learn Reaper. If you learn Reaper then I wouldn't worry about FL. I say "classic" as in standard. If you look at Reaper, Cubase, Pro Tools, Logic they all look similar. Just search screen shots.

Before you learn audio production you need to learn some DAW basics. So search something along the lines of "[DAW NAME] Beginner Tutorial"

Quote by Sample246
Alright, would you happen to know of the best FL Studio tutorials, perhaps some geared towards rock musicians?

I don't know any tutorials, but you really need to be able to grasp recording audio clips in FL and how to get them on the mixer if your doing rock music. If you want I can kind of throw together a picture and text tutorial (I don't know how to do video stuff) after class tomorrow as I need to head to bed.

If you don't plan using much MIDI though you may be better of with Reaper or Cubase.
Last edited by FireHawk at Feb 21, 2012,
#10
I would Listen to FireHawk, he seems have a very soild gasp on this DAW stuff.

I think I could even learn some thing XD, I think I might check out this reaper program
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#11
If you are serious about this, and willing to spend money there is an "Home Recording For Musicians For Dummies" book. Haven't read it, so you might want to look up reviews first.
Edit:
But it will most likely be quite general, which will allow you to learn your program, while learning that material in the book
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#12
Quote by targetdude
I would Listen to FireHawk, he seems have a very soild gasp on this DAW stuff.

I think I could even learn some thing XD, I think I might check out this reaper program

I just know FL pretty in depth lol. When it comes to using other DAWs, I can navigate and record but I am pretty slow at it (trying to learn Reaper in depth on the side), FL I can knock stuff out very, very fast.
#13
Alright, how about this. I already understand how to route something from the playlist to a mixer channel, and how to add different plugins and stuff. But I feel like there's SO MUCH MORE for me to learn. Would you mind becoming my instant messenger buddy FireHawk? That way, we can share stuff and I can ask your advice on things when I get stuck. Tell me this, though. Do you know much about recording with rock music? The stuff in on your profile page sounds pretty techno, which is awesome, but how much standard rock band kind of music do you do?
#14
Quote by Sample246
Alright, how about this. I already understand how to route something from the playlist to a mixer channel, and how to add different plugins and stuff. But I feel like there's SO MUCH MORE for me to learn. Would you mind becoming my instant messenger buddy FireHawk? That way, we can share stuff and I can ask your advice on things when I get stuck. Tell me this, though. Do you know much about recording with rock music? The stuff in on your profile page sounds pretty techno, which is awesome, but how much standard rock band kind of music do you do?

I record more rock and rock with synths stuff (like nine inch nails) than my profile would lead you to believe. I'm on phone or I'd link you to some example. 90% of my songs are very rock driven.

I'll send you a PM in the morning and we can figure out an instant message arrangement.
#15
Quote by FireHawk
I record more rock and rock with synths stuff (like nine inch nails) than my profile would lead you to believe. I'm on phone or I'd link you to some example. 90% of my songs are very rock driven.

I'll send you a PM in the morning and we can figure out an instant message arrangement.


Sounds good bro!!