#1
Hey guys, i need some advice on how to improve.. i'm 19 and have been playing for about 3 years. though only seriously practiced this last year. im at an intermediate level.. i guess ''low'' intermediate.
i was talking with one of my friends who's pretty good and he said that if i were to give this schedule about 5 months of practice i' could improve bounds. what do you think of it?? suggestions?

i've figured out the times based on how long i can do each before losing focus.

1. Technique 1hr
- alternate picking 10 min (solid alt picking so i don't focus much time on it.)
- Sweeping 20 min
- Legato 30 min

2. Rhythm 45 min
- Songs (just ''chordy'' ones) 30 min
- Follk style rhythms 15

3. Song 45min (working on cocaine atm)

5. M/m scales 30 min
- Scale 15min
- Jam 15min

6. Blues. i'd like to move on to rock later on. 2hrs
- Penta scales 30min
- Licks 45
- Rhythm 20min
- Jam 30min
Last edited by claptoncocaine at Feb 21, 2012,
#2
If you were to abide by that practice routine each day then yes, you would improve greatly. I'd recommend that you put in about 10-15 min of slow warmups before you practice your technique though. That should help you to keep everything as clean as possible as well as get the blood flowing a bit before you get serious.
#3
Quote by MonsterMetalMus
If you were to abide by that practice routine each day then yes, you would improve greatly. I'd recommend that you put in about 10-15 min of slow warmups before you practice your technique though. That should help you to keep everything as clean as possible as well as get the blood flowing a bit before you get serious.


should the warmups be exercises aswell? or just noodling around?
#4
You work more on the sweep than on the alternate, personally, I will do the opposite.

Order : Alternate then Legato then Sweep picking.

But it's just my opinion and most of all do warm up
"Sans la musique, la vie serait une erreur" Nietzsche
#5
Quote by Syndromed
You work more on the sweep than on the alternate, personally, I will do the opposite.

Order : Alternate then Legato then Sweep picking.

But it's just my opinion and most of all do warm up


i'm really good at alt picking so i don't need that much time on it. i wish i could say the same about my legato.
#6
Quote by claptoncocaine
Hey guys, i need some advice on how to improve.. i'm 19 and have been playing for about 3 years. though only seriously practiced this last year. im at an intermediate level.. i guess ''low'' intermediate.
i was talking with one of my friends who's pretty good and he said that if i were to give this schedule about 5 months of practice i' could improve bounds. what do you think of it?? suggestions?

i've figured out the times based on how long i can do each before losing focus.

1. Technique 1hr
- alternate picking 10 min
- Sweeping 20 min
- Legato 30 min

2. Rhythm 45 min
- Songs (just ''chordy'' ones) 30 min
- Follk style rhythms 15

3. Song 45min (working on cocaine atm)

5. M/m scales 30 min
- Scale 15min
- Jam 15min

6. Blues. i'd like to move on to rock later on. 2hrs
- Penta scales 30min
- Licks 45
- Rhythm 20min
- Jam 30min


Everything works to some extent so yes of course you will improve. Even if you were to play 1 hour a week you would still improve but at a very slow pace.

You should be spending a lot more time on alternate picking than sweep picking. Sweep picking is a technique that you will probably rarely use and alternate picking is a technique that you will use in pretty much everything you do. Without a solid alternate picking technique, you will be very limited to what you can play.
#7
Thats a bit extreme in my opinion. I dont know exactly what level you are but i wouldnt work on too many things at once. Alternate picking, legato and sweep picking are very hard to master and working on all of them at once is probably going to cause some confusion in your hands.

I would do some legato as a warm up and then alternate picking for not more than 45 min. Its important that you practice different kind of licks in order to get good at both outside and inside picking. You should play 2 notes per string scales, for example Am pentatonic, and 3 notes per string scales, for example A minor scale. Start at a relatively slow tempo and play each scale using quarter notes, eight notes, 16th, 8th notes triplets and when you get really good at it you can try 16th notes triplets.

Remeber that resting is almost as important as practicing, meaning that you dont have to over-do your practice session or force yourself to play at a certain speed.
#8
For rythm you should practise songs with more difficult ones using a metronome cos a big part of rythm is staying in time. I'd recommend funk songs cos they're have very advanced and interesting rythm patterns.
As for a warm up, I just noodle around but you can do what you want really.

Just be sure that you are capable of sticking to that regime cos finding 5hrs a day to practise is EXTREMELY difficult if you are a student. I practise for 3hrs oer day and when I have the time I practise as much as possible. Today I practise for 6 hours and in the summer holidays I prsctised for 10 hours a day (seriously).

I would also lend some time to coming up with your own stuff.
#9
Quote by itamar100
For rythm you should practise songs with more difficult ones using a metronome cos a big part of rythm is staying in time. I'd recommend funk songs cos they're have very advanced and interesting rythm patterns.
As for a warm up, I just noodle around but you can do what you want really.

Just be sure that you are capable of sticking to that regime cos finding 5hrs a day to practise is EXTREMELY difficult if you are a student. I practise for 3hrs oer day and when I have the time I practise as much as possible. Today I practise for 6 hours and in the summer holidays I prsctised for 10 hours a day (seriously).

I would also lend some time to coming up with your own stuff.


good idea.. hadn't thought about the use of funk. thnx
#10
Yeh I find it's good that at the end of a practice you put some of the techniques into use by using different backing tracks to solo and practice over, there are lots of good backing tracks on YouTube and magazines. Also if you can join a band or have a few friends to jam with, you really learn a lot.
#11
When it comes to to developing a practice routine, you want to make sure that you have your goals lined up. If you want to become proficient at technique, you want to be sure to analyze different ways in which you use your techniques and then prioritize them in your practice routine. All the while, you have to remember that you want to be able to make MUSIC with this stuff.

My basic routine is as follows:

I always warm up, stretch ahead of time
Then I do some vibrato and bends, not just to warm up my fingers but to get my focused on something simple.

I then do trills 2-5 minute each finger, or sometimes finger combinations. I alternate between slow and clean, no tension, to real fast. This is like interval training

Then depending on what I am working on, i will work on differnet picking techniques which include tetra chords, outside picking, inside picking, 3 nps, 2 nps etc.

Then I move to sweeping. I hold a basic chord shape and only focus on the right hand. This get's the right hand to get the motion down smoothly. Then i add in a basic form with the left hand. The right hand HAS TO GET THE MOTION FIRST or else it is doomed to fail.


Keep track of your progress and remember why you are doing all of the things that you are, to make music!


www.tauntonguitarlessons.com
#12
Quote by joshbeetler
When it comes to to developing a practice routine, you want to make sure that you have your goals lined up. If you want to become proficient at technique, you want to be sure to analyze different ways in which you use your techniques and then prioritize them in your practice routine. All the while, you have to remember that you want to be able to make MUSIC with this stuff.

My basic routine is as follows:

I always warm up, stretch ahead of time
Then I do some vibrato and bends, not just to warm up my fingers but to get my focused on something simple.

I then do trills 2-5 minute each finger, or sometimes finger combinations. I alternate between slow and clean, no tension, to real fast. This is like interval training

Then depending on what I am working on, i will work on differnet picking techniques which include tetra chords, outside picking, inside picking, 3 nps, 2 nps etc.

Then I move to sweeping. I hold a basic chord shape and only focus on the right hand. This get's the right hand to get the motion down smoothly. Then i add in a basic form with the left hand. The right hand HAS TO GET THE MOTION FIRST or else it is doomed to fail.


Keep track of your progress and remember why you are doing all of the things that you are, to make music!


www.tauntonguitarlessons.com


wicked tip man. i think i'll start keeping a journal of my progress.
#13
Quote by claptoncocaine
should the warmups be exercises aswell? or just noodling around?



They can be whatever you'd like. I usually warmup doing standard chromatic exercises to a metronome, but noodling can work just as well. As long as you don't rush into doing your normal exercises full speed you should be good.