#1
I can think of at least three forums into which this thread could go, so I'm sorry if this is the wrong one... Anyway, here goes:

I want to record some feedback using Audacity. When I record guitar parts, I use a line in from my amp (Roland Cube) directly into my computer, which provides reasonably good quality. However now that I'm wanting to record feedback (which obviously needs a speaker at a high volume), I won't be able to record using the line in, because it mutes the amp's speaker. I don't want to mic the amp, as I don't have a mic and don't want to buy one.

The only idea I've had is to split the signal from my guitar, then run half through my Cube to create the feedback I want, and the other half through a Vox AmPlug and into my computer. Anyone got any feedback (ololol) on this idea? Will splitting the signal reduce te sound quality? Thanks in advance
#2
I ran into this problem with many songs that I try to cover. A quick method to recording feedback with the line in is actually playing the note that sounds like the feedback with higher frets or hitting a harmonic. I tend to find the note within 3 attempts. Then I usually fade in with my DAW.

Hope That Helps.
#4
You record using your computer's line in & you want good quality? Sorry, that isn't going to happen.

If you want to record decent quality on your PC, you need to get a proper interface. You'll also be far better off getting over your desire to not buy a mic and purchase a decent one of those too.

Good things do not come for free. If you want a quality recording you're going to have to buy the proper kit.
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#5
As I said in the OP, the quality I'm getting is satisfactory. If you'd read my post properly you would have known that I am asking for advice on how to record feedback, which I can't do in the same way as everything else I'm recording.
#6
Here's how I did it once, at a pretty low volume, and it turned out beautifully.

I used a Behringer V-amp (actually, the X-V-amp) and dialed in my sound that I was going to record direct.

Instead of monitoring through headphones, since I'm recording direct anyways, I monitored with my monitors. I turned them up a little, but with the amount of gain I had on the V-amp, I didn't need to turn them up much. I held the guitar up in front of one of my 6" drivers and it just fed back the way it would in front of a stack, only at a volume you could probably carry on a conversation over.

The result is in my profile. Listen to the intro and first verse of Unsaid.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#7
Failing what Chris suggested (and by the way, Gary is correct that recording line-in is a rather lo-fi way of recording, though if you're happy I guess that's all that matters), the best solution would just be to find an online sample library where you can find some royalty-free samples of feedback and blend them to your own taste. Not only will this be much easier to get a decent control over the feedback you want, but it is also more likely to be recorded to a cleaner quality as I'd imagine it is pretty fumbly trying to get feedback of a similar level as when running through a decent amp at high volume.
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