#1
and learn something else with-out feeling like I missed something? What should I learn about them? I don't expect to learn everything about them (Unless I should, keep in mind I'm not a complete beginner but no where close as good with theory as most of you) Anyone that could name some things to learn would be very helpful.
#3
How to make music with them.

You should be able to create melodies with them that are at least a little catchy. You should understand exactly what each note is going to sound like over each chord in a progression BEFORE you play it. You should be able to sing patterns in them and then instantly play those patterns without having to hunt and peck for it. You should be able to hear a lick, recognize whether it's in major or minor, and play it.

They should not be shapes on the fretboard - they should be musical ideas.
#4
Quote by HotspurJr
How to make music with them.


Yep, also how to harmonise them, keys.....

You never really "move on" from the major and minor scales.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by tmr7350
the 5 patterns, roots, arpeggios, caged system, ref chords


Ref chords??

Quote by HotspurJr
How to make music with them.

You should be able to create melodies with them that are at least a little catchy. You should understand exactly what each note is going to sound like over each chord in a progression BEFORE you play it. You should be able to sing patterns in them and then instantly play those patterns without having to hunt and peck for it. You should be able to hear a lick, recognize whether it's in major or minor, and play it.

They should not be shapes on the fretboard - they should be musical ideas.



A melody is a chord progression, right? Excuse my ignorance.

Also, on the what will sound good thing, is there kinda like a rule of thumb or something or is it all trial and error? Or is there something I can look up on this subject? Also, the whole hearing and then playing is more something that will develop? I'm not quite sure how I go about doing that

Quote by AlanHB
Yep, also how to harmonise them, keys.....

You never really "move on" from the major and minor scales.


Just to be clear, harmonizing means to derive chords from the key, right? Like be able to name diatonic chords, correct?

Also, I figured I'd never really move on, more so wanting a comfortable amount of knowledge on them.
#6
I think you should do some blues. Considering the minor pentatonic is similar to the blues scale try some licks and see how artists are using the scales. Another aspect is understanding how the scales actually connect on the fretboard. After learning minor pentatonics/ blues I did a lot of work with like picking out parts of The Black Keys and White Stripes records to sort of wrap a concept up.
#7
Quote by COREYTAYLOR721
I think you should do some blues. Considering the minor pentatonic is similar to the blues scale try some licks and see how artists are using the scales. Another aspect is understanding how the scales actually connect on the fretboard. After learning minor pentatonics/ blues I did a lot of work with like picking out parts of The Black Keys and White Stripes records to sort of wrap a concept up.

I know Min pent all of the shapes and how to add the dim 5th into it.

I'm currently trying to "break" the idea of staying in boxes.
#8
Quote by srvfan2022
I know Min pent all of the shapes and how to add the dim 5th into it.

I'm currently trying to "break" the idea of staying in boxes.


Well I'm inferring from your name that you like Stevie Ray Vaughn, he uses the major, minor and blues scales, why not see how he uses them to "break out of the box".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#9

A melody is a chord progression, right? Excuse my ignorance.


No. A melody is a sequence of notes that go together, one after the other, in a pleasing way.

You might benefit from this series:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PnbOWi6f_IM

Also, on the what will sound good thing, is there kinda like a rule of thumb or something or is it all trial and error? Or is there something I can look up on this subject?


This is like asking if there is a rule for what colors go together. Sure, there are things that seem to naturally fit, and other things that require more effort to make work. There is no substitute for experience, but you can hurry the process along by studying music that strikes you as pleasant - learning how it does what it does.

Also, the whole hearing and then playing is more something that will develop? I'm not quite sure how I go about doing that


Download the functional ear trainer from Miles.Be. It's free, and will seem very complicated at first, but trust that it'll get easier as you do it.

There are also good books on ear training, but I think it's a little early for you to worry about that.

Quote by srvfan2022
I know Min pent all of the shapes and how to add the dim 5th into it.

I'm currently trying to "break" the idea of staying in boxes.


You aren't experienced enough yet for it to make sense for you to worry about breaking out of boxes. As you gain experience, developing your ear will be the key to "breaking out of boxes"

But for now, play in the box, and focus on the relationship between the notes you are playing in the box and the chords you're playing over.