#1
PLZPLZPLZPLZPLZ help.


so for this science assignment for my coursework, i need to determine the empirical formula of magnesium oxide.

While i know that it is MgO, i need to show my workings as such:

Mg : O
mass =
amount = n = m/M =


simplest mole ratio=

empirical formula=__________.


the number of moles=mass/molecular mass is simplified to n= m/M

please help me out, i have no idea how to do this.
#4
If you can't do this, quit chemistry now.

EDIT: Okay, so what information are you given?
i don't know why i feel so dry
Last edited by Eastwinn at Feb 21, 2012,
#5
Intense chemistry? Do you like, watch reactions really really avidly?
🙈 🙉 🙊
#6
Quote by entity0009
Intense chemistry? Do you like, watch reactions really really avidly?

No he is just talking about our love


oh dear why did I say that
#7
Quote by Duffman123
No he is just talking about our love


oh dear why did I say that

🙈 🙉 🙊
#8
Wow. Porn spambots. This is not a good day for UG.
NOW PART OF THE

Quote by Robchappers
You are epic my friend ;-)
Quote by RU Experienced?
At this point I'd be more surprised if you found me a Christian children's entertainer that didn't sodomize and eat kids.
#9
mass of magnesium is 0.24 grammes, oxygen is 0.03 grammes, and total is 0.27 grammes.

what do i do next?

and duffman, i love your thrusting. it really is intense.
#10
Quote by GibsonMan321
Wow. Porn spambots. This is not a good day for UG.

Naw, it's that Kelly22 bitch.

OT: TS, tell me the question and I'll help you out.

P.S. this is actually really easy chem stuff.

Edit: 1(0.24 Mg) + 1(0.03 O) = 0.27

THerefore there is 1 Mg and 1 O. If I understand your question right.
-The Crimson Fucker, aka PonyFan #376121
Last edited by metal4eva_22 at Feb 21, 2012,
#12
i think i have to go:

0.24/ 24.305 = 0.00987

0.03/ 15.999= 0.01875.

then 0.00987/itself = 1

so ratio is: mg : o
= 1: 1.899.

= 1:2. am i right?
#13
When your Chem book clearly has the formula weights for those elements on the periodic table of elements, why did your lazy ass come to us for homework help?
#14
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
When your Chem book clearly has the formula weights for those elements on the periodic table of elements, why did your lazy ass come to us for homework help?


Yea they give me a study guide at my school.


Quote by Horsedick.MPEG
24


25
Trust me, I'm a Jedi.

Quote by Minkaro
You must control your use of the force, young Trizek.
Last edited by Trizek at Feb 21, 2012,
#16
which actually makes me wrong in the first place, because magnesium oxide would then be MgO2
#17
i came here because im stupid and hadnt made the connection that i had to use the results in the practical we did in class as th numerator of the equation.

what does 24 and 25 have to do with anything, apart from magnesiums molar mass?
suddenly i understand this a lot better.
#18
Quote by Spaztikko
i came here because im stupid .


Now THERE'S your problem.
#19
Quote by metal4eva_22
I think you mean 42.


Wha? I was just counting along with Horsedick's "24" post.

And btw: 43
Trust me, I'm a Jedi.

Quote by Minkaro
You must control your use of the force, young Trizek.
#20
ok chev, not stupid, but with absolutely no clue because at no point did it outright state i had to use practical obtained values.

fck it man, im in 5th form.
#21
First you divide the weight of the samples by the molar mass of the respective elements. After that, you've got the number of moles. Then, you divide both of the numbers by the smallest amount of moles and you've got the number of moles in relation to each other. Then you have the mole fraction and just set up a sensible empirical formula with the elements.