#1
Hey all,

I'm considering teaching guitar some time in the future and trying to keep that in mind while I decide what path to go down in buying gear. That means I need something that'll take two inputs, and if I can't get that then I'll continue using emulation software, and will probably spend the money on a macbook instead of an amp. But what I really want is an AC15, because they're amazing.

So, I know it'd be shit to plug the guitars into the normal and top boost channels individually. Is there some sort of tiny mixer or something that can combine the two signals into something that'll sound fine through the amp?

Also, I've read that using an ABY box (suggestions for that would be great too btw) is brilliant for blending the two channels. So I'd have both guitars -> mixer -> ABY box for two identical outputs, one for each channel. Is there an easier way to do this? Like, will a mixer be able to output the combined signal into those two outputs?

And please tell me if anything I've said here is retarded and why. Hardware setups are a totally foreign world to me 'cause I've used software as an affordable alternative for so long.
#2
I would buy the ac-15, it's a great amp, my brother has one. For guitar lessons i would be fine to play 2 guitars through an ac-15. if the volume differs you can just adjust that on the amp or even on your guitar. You don't need the best tone for lessons.

The thing with the ABY box isn't neccesary, but it's great if you want some extra tonal options for playing by yourself, or for switching channels when you're playing live.
#3
Just a suggestion: you can probably get 2 AC15's for the price of a Macbook. (well, at least, where I live)
#4
Sometimes playing two guitars through the same amp can sound like hell if both are playing at the same time. They tend to kinda blend together since both signals are coming through the same amp. Though on the AC15, one being in the top boost channel may give you enough variety to stand apart. When I was messing around with this, we were using a splitter to plug two guitars into the same amp input... it was not optimal. We ran into a really odd impedance issue where one guitar would sound normal, but the other one would sound like it had the volume knob rolled almost all the way off if they played at the same time.
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#5
Plugging two guitars into the same amp rarely works out well.

Just buy a Microcube as a second amp.
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#6
Ah thanks for the answers guys. jpatan, wouldn't a splitter mean the signals still interfere? Like, I would've thought that would be very different to mixing them properly. Though the fact they both have exactly the same tone might be a problem, as you say. Might ask the music store and see if they have any suggestions and hopefully they'll let me try it out in the shop.

Quote by I K0nijn I
Just a suggestion: you can probably get 2 AC15's for the price of a Macbook. (well, at least, where I live)


I could, but it'll be hard enough lugging one and a guitar around, let alone two (in case I teach somewhere other than home). Those things are what, 20kg? Also a laptop is, you know, a laptop :P

But by the sounds of it, the macbook would be the best option at this point unless the music store can convince me otherwise though geez that'll be expensive (especially considering my speakers are crap and I'll want to get some nice monitors). It shouldn't take TOO long to save up for an AC15 later in addition. Really want it now though...

Will also consider the possibility of two small shitty amps. That makes too much sense to ignore, despite the drawback of the fact they'll be shitty.

As an aside, how much do you have to crank an AC15 to get some nice distortion? I live alone in an apartment with well soundproofed walls so I can go a bit above bedroom levels, but noise is still a bit of an issue.
#7
yeah, for lessons I'd probably just grab a couple cubes or something, and keep the AC15 at home.

Describe "nice distortion"...

It has a master volume and a gain knob, so you can get a pretty fair amount of gain at low volumes. If you really want it to sizzle you'll have to crank it though.

Wait, we ARE talking about the AC15C1, right? I hope you're not talking about the VR version.
Quote by tubetime86
He's obviously pretty young, and I'd guess he's being raised by wolves, or at least humans with the intellectual capacity and compassion of wolves.


You finally made it home, draped in the flag that you fell for.
And so it goes
#8
Oh god yes, definitely the AC15C1.

Hmm, I guess that gain is probably similar (well much better, but you know what I mean) to the distortion I got out of my Pathfinder 10 at really low levels with the overdrive toggle, i.e. dirty, shallow and horrible. That might be a deal breaker, I'll make sure I check that out next time I'm at the store.
#9
The AC15C1 can get pretty distorted on low volumes. The master volume works really well.