#1
Hello,

I have a 1976 Greco Super sounds '69 copy.
Over the years I have upgraded it and made it my own.

a long time ago I put 3 lace sensor gold pickups in.
Since then I have been unable to get a good sound out of the bridge pickup.
It is very trebly and reducing the treble on the amp or turning down the tone knobs doesn't seem to work as it makes the other selector settings sound awful.

Is there anything I can stick in the circuit to reduce this on the bridge pickup like a resistor or something? (I don't know if the pots are 500 or 250)

Alternatively would something as simple as an EQ pedal solve my problem?

Thanks,
#2
Id check the wiring first.. make sure all the connections are still in place and spray electronics cleaner in the pots
#3
thanks, it's already had a clean out, I had to replace a faulty 5 way switch the other day so I know it's all clean and the connections are all there.

Any other ideas?
Last edited by teejay86 at Feb 22, 2012,
#4
In all honesty, anything you do inside the guitar that's not unnecessarily complicated (like adding an active buffer) is going to effect the other pickups as well..

It seems like your best bet will just be to try changing out the bridge pickup for something a little more mellow. If you want to do anything short of that and don't know what value your pots are, check that out. If they're 500k, you could change them to 250k, but again, that'll effect all your pickups
#5
I was afraid this might be the answer, just need to find the right pickup.
I'm thinking Seymour Duncan SSL-5. I hear they are common bridge replacement pickups.
#6
You could try wiring in a passive low pass filter made up of just a resistor and a cap to peel off some of the highs. If you did this ONLY to the bridge pickup it would leave the others the hell alone it'd be fine. Just wire all this in BEFORE the pickup selector. Basically all the frequencies in guitar are below 4kHz and the highest fundamental (fretted) is in the neighborhood of 1.2 kHz.

Low-pass filter basics

Based on values for 'normal' tone pots and caps you can set that the corner frequency of the filter down around 100Hz and it's about the same as having tone rolled all the way off on the knob.

You probably don't want to dial it back that much, just kill some of the highs, so probably solve the equation for something like 1kHz (around the highest fundamental on the fretboard anyway) and buy the right components and put it in there. Or you could wire the bridge it's own tone control, kinda like what the Strat does for the mid pickup and bridge pickup (separately) anyway.

You may still be unhappy with the tone, but it's a hell of a lot cheaper than replacing the pickup. Eric Johnson wires his tone controls to the bridge the neck pickup and never uses the mid on his strats alone... But he's just the master of tone, so what does he know?
#7
Quote by RadioMuse
You could try wiring in a passive low pass filter made up of just a resistor and a cap to peel off some of the highs. If you did this ONLY to the bridge pickup it would leave the others the hell alone it'd be fine. Just wire all this in BEFORE the pickup selector. Basically all the frequencies in guitar are below 4kHz and the highest fundamental (fretted) is in the neighborhood of 1.2 kHz.

Low-pass filter basics

Based on values for 'normal' tone pots and caps you can set that the corner frequency of the filter down around 100Hz and it's about the same as having tone rolled all the way off on the knob.

You probably don't want to dial it back that much, just kill some of the highs, so probably solve the equation for something like 1kHz (around the highest fundamental on the fretboard anyway) and buy the right components and put it in there. Or you could wire the bridge it's own tone control, kinda like what the Strat does for the mid pickup and bridge pickup (separately) anyway.

You may still be unhappy with the tone, but it's a hell of a lot cheaper than replacing the pickup. Eric Johnson wires his tone controls to the bridge the neck pickup and never uses the mid on his strats alone... But he's just the master of tone, so what does he know?

wether you put a low pass filter in before or after the selector switch, you'll still be effecting the tone of the rest of the pickups.. a switch is completely passive, so putting a low pass filter between the bridge pickup and switch would really give you the same result as putting it at the guitar's output
#8
I put in one of the original EXCEL pickups, still got the same vintage sound without the highs.
Had to cut out a pickup cover to accommodate it's unusual small size but It looks killer.
Thanks for the help guys, maybe ill pot a picture of it later.