#1
So I'm about to build a pedalboard, but I'm still figuring out how I want to power pedals. I've looked at the power "blocks" like the Voodoo Lab and the BBE Supa Charger, but what is the difference between this and just using individual power supplies and a power strip? Does it save energy or something? I have a good collection of power supplies already and wouldn't want to shell out $100+ for something that's not necessary.
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#2
Just buy a Visual Sound One Spot system. Its just a single power supply with an increased mA rating to accomodate multiple pedals, and it comes with a 'daisy chain' which has 5 (or eight if you buy the ;upgrade' daisy chain) plugs on it. I think the whole set up costs around $30.

The downside, and reason for the more expensive units is noise. I don't have a problem with it, but some do.
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#3
I'm considering that too, or maybe even a combination of one-spot and regular power supplies, but like you said, I've read that there can be a lot of noise (my rig already has quite a bit noise) and it could potentially fry all your pedals in extreme situations. I might go for it though. Still if anyone has an answer to my original question, it would greatly be appreciated.
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#4
Yeah the problems start occurring with touring guitar players and the different venues' varying electricity (such as lighting) that they go to. But as for playing home, it doesn't really matter.
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#5
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Yeah the problems start occurring with touring guitar players and the different venues' varying electricity (such as lighting) that they go to. But as for playing home, it doesn't really matter.

Sorry, but I don't understand. What causes the problem? Multiple power supplies?
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#6
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Sorry, but I don't understand. What causes the problem? Multiple power supplies?


No it's interference in the signal due to some of the other things drawing electricity from the same source, such as lighting rigs in a venue. There's not really an issue if you're only playing at home, but if you're playing gigs then it may become problematic using multiple power supplies that don't isolate your signal.
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Last edited by lordrcceaser at Feb 22, 2012,
#7
What exactly does it mean to isolate a signal?
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