#1
I recently purchased a Ibanez RG827QM from Thomann, and it arrived earlier this week. Played it, and instantly fell in love with it. However, there is some major fret buzz issues with it. All the strings buzz on the second fret. Most also buzz on either the first and third frets as well, or both. The A string buzzes from the first to the fourth, and the low E from the first to the fifth. The low B however is the biggest problem. It buzzes when the string is open, all the way up to the eighth fret.

The action of the strings is maybe a touch low, though it's no lower than 0.5 mm less than what's recommended in the manual. I checked the neck relief by fretting at the first and nineteenth frets, and the string was laying along the frets, with no gap.

Is there anything I can do to overcome this problem? I'd rather not send it back, as I've already fallen in love with it otherwise. Shipping guitars to Germany from the UK is also rather expensive lol.

Many thanks!
#2
My first thought was, "Check the action. Sounds like it's too low."

Actually, my first thought was, "Holy crap, here we go again -- a bunch of people are going to start telling this guy to adjust his truss rod..." Then I thought about the above...
Richard

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#4
First, before making adjustments, you might try a couple things:

Tune it. Okay you probably did, but maybe you forgot? That's the first thing I'd check. As the strings loosen they will start to buzz at some point. Probably won't fix your problem, but if it does it didn't cost you anything did it?



Second consider where you live and where you've been storing it. Was the guitar in a cold shop (maybe the heat is down to save cash) and you moved it to your nice, warm house? A temp change of 5-10 degrees can affect it, especially on the warmer end.

Don't mess with your neck or "action" or any of that until you're absolutely sure you need to. That's like surgery, and like with human surgery it could "kill" your guitar. Take it seriously!

Next thing you might think about is a fresh set of strings. Strings are cheap, and you can always put them on and take them right back off again. Have you tried upping a gauge?

I play on .12's. So did SRV.

Anyway do the above before you start adjusting things. It's a delicate science and takes a lot of experience. When you ARE ready to learn these things I suggest using your "beginner" guitar in case you inevitably screw something up. You need a "sacrificial" guitar to start learning basic Luthiery and maintenance skills.

Don't just dive in and start cranking your main instrument!

Much easier to just throw a set of .10's on there, tune 'em up, and say, "Eh, I don't like these" and then go in some more drastic direction later.
#5
I'd say what Floss Ninja just posted above, don't really "mess" with it unless you know what you are doing with the neck, if you just received it not long ago then let it get used to your temp, as he said it's rather cold... I once received a telecaster from the mail that because of BIG change in temp the frets felt out of place and like they could cut you, the neck shrunk for about a day or so, so yeah, just let it get used to you and don't really go crazy on it that much, TUNE IT and then if problems still persist there re-string it and re-tune your guitar.

Now if this don't solve this issue i say make the action higher by at least 0.1mm, tune it again and go from there, if it still is not solved then i would tell you to either look online and READ thoroughly about how to set up properly a guitar and then go to do it as Floss said this is really delicate when you have to touch your truss-rod and etc so if you don't really know or don't feel confident enough after reading about it leave it to a tech to take care of it Don't wanna risk your new baby right???

EDIT: Forgot to mention, normally when my strings buzz even when i play it open then i just have to adjust my truss rod a little bit to fix it orrrrrrrrr move up to a higher gauge of strings if i don't want to mess with the truss rod at the time :/ solves it and no problems with none of my guitars ever.
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Last edited by Heilz at Feb 23, 2012,
#6
As a short-term fix you might fold up a piece of paper, or use a piece of gum wrapper, and wedge it up under the string in the nut.



10-second bar-room solution. One of those, "Shit, time to play!!" gems of wisdom that may keep a bottle of Bud from getting whipped at your head one of these days.
#7
Yeah, and to be clear I wasn't suggesting he do any of the work himself.
Richard

I tried setting my password to "penis". It said my password wasn't long enough.

PRSi:
*ME Quatro
*CE-22
*SE Soapbar II
H&K TubeMeister
TC Electronic Nova System

PBT Native
#8
Quote by Floss Ninja
First, before making adjustments, you might try a couple things:

Tune it. Okay you probably did, but maybe you forgot? That's the first thing I'd check. As the strings loosen they will start to buzz at some point. Probably won't fix your problem, but if it does it didn't cost you anything did it?



Second consider where you live and where you've been storing it. Was the guitar in a cold shop (maybe the heat is down to save cash) and you moved it to your nice, warm house? A temp change of 5-10 degrees can affect it, especially on the warmer end.


Yeah, I definitely remembered to tune it lol. Never even thought about the temperature issue though. I don't know what the temperature in their warehouse is like, but it did spend about four days travelling, most likely in an unheated lorry. That could be the issue. Also, I have it now on a Hercules stand, where-as I received it in a case. Could that be an issue? My room is also quite humid, so I'm assuming that likely is affecting it too.

Don't mess with your neck or "action" or any of that until you're absolutely sure you need to. That's like surgery, and like with human surgery it could "kill" your guitar. Take it seriously!


I actually have several other guitars, and have done both several times in the past. I'm confident in what I'm doing with them. I just don't want to do any thing on a guitar I may have to send back (hope I don't ). Second opinions can never hurt, and I'll likely get an opinion from some one more knowledgeable than myself this way.

Next thing you might think about is a fresh set of strings. Strings are cheap, and you can always put them on and take them right back off again. Have you tried upping a gauge?

I play on .12's. So did SRV.

Anyway do the above before you start adjusting things. It's a delicate science and takes a lot of experience. When you ARE ready to learn these things I suggest using your "beginner" guitar in case you inevitably screw something up. You need a "sacrificial" guitar to start learning basic Luthiery and maintenance skills.

Don't just dive in and start cranking your main instrument!

Much easier to just throw a set of .10's on there, tune 'em up, and say, "Eh, I don't like these" and then go in some more drastic direction later.


I suspect it has .009's on it at the minute. If I get time at the weekend I have a pack of .010's to put on. Again though, it wasn't something I wanted to do until I was 100% positive there wasn't anything actually wrong with the guitar, and it was normal issues I could correct easily.
#9
Actually inside a case it may be more safe than leaving it outside on a stand :O
"RAWR WIRES >:O"
One more kiss... One more touch...
I miss you, wont you hug me just one last time?

Twitter!!~ Follow Re-follow :P
#10
Since the guitar is new I suspect it is adjusting to it's new home. You could try the folded-up piece of paper trick for a day or two and see if it corrects itself.

That's probably what I'd do.
#11
did you ever manage to fix this? I'm VERY close to clicking buy on one of these from thomman but would like to see how you dealt with the buzz?
#12
Check the truss rod. I had a guitar one time that Played great but had fret buzz. I went to get it checked out and all they had to do was adjust the Truss rod and it worked like a charm!
#13
Guess what! There is a reason a bunch of people are going to tell you to adjust the truss rod. It's because that is what needs done. If the strings are laying flat on the frets when fretted at the first and last fret then there is no relief on the neck. Loosen the truss rod about 1/4 to 1/2 turn until you get a little relief in there. And don't be afraid of it. You'd have to really tighten down that truss rod to cause any damage at all to the guitar. This stuff isn't surgery. It's basic tweaking that often needs done on a guitar, especially a new one right out of the box. These things are seldom set up perfectly. I'd tweak to truss rod to get proper relief. Then start fine tuning your action as needed. After that you can start changing to heavier strings if you think that's what you need and are comfortable with. If you are still having issues it's possible that you could need some fret work. Even high end guitars often come from the factory with high or low frets that need addressed. This is something you obviously want a pro to deal with if you don't have the proper experience to address the issue yourself.