#1
So I'm building a cigar box acoustic guitar and I was wondering if I could bolt the bottom of the neck to the box? It's a 6 string and I'm going to buy the neck. Could I drill through the top of the box and through the bottom of the neck and bolt it on like that?? Thanks
"When the power of love over comes the love of power the world will know peace."
~Jimi Hendrix
#2
I would say probably to glue it to the cigar box, but seeing as the box is made out of metal and wood glue or any similar might not help the metal/wood bond be strong enough to handle the tension.

I say go bolt-on, but at the same time i was thinking how much can an aluminum box hold the tension of the strings without warping so let's see if someone who has done one come in and say a thing or two hehe.
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#3
Actually this one is made of pine haha I should of mention that earlier :p
"When the power of love over comes the love of power the world will know peace."
~Jimi Hendrix
#4
So will it hurt drilling through the bottom of the neck??
"When the power of love over comes the love of power the world will know peace."
~Jimi Hendrix
#5
I build an internal hardwood spine that the neck, bridge, tailpiece, and box bolt to on my CBG's. But my CBG's are full tilt electric not acoustic. To me, an acoustic CBG might sound slightly worse than a ukulele or a samisan.
The spine is as wide as the bridge, and fits tight inside of the box. Be sure to get a box long enough for your neck's scale length, and tailpiece with the neck inset into the top of the box, screwed in from the back, either with the screwplate inside or outside of the box. Inset the neck into the spine enough for it to be the right height above the top of the CBG for the bridge and action to work out right. This spine gives your CBG a solid base. The CBG's neck, spine, bridge and tailpiece could strung up and played without the box if it's built right.
I also weight the box with an old GM brake caliper, lead tire or fishing weights, timing chain piece, etc. to bring the guitar into balance. Without the counterweight, the CBG feels too light, neck heavy, and won't stay still when you play. The added weight adds to tone, sustain, and makes the guitar heavy enough to, with a guitar strap, not run away from you when you play it.
A single pickup, tone/volume knobs, and an output jack will bring your beast to life. I hope this helps a bit. Good luck.