Poll: Well?
Poll Options
View poll results: Well?
Limitations of human communications / I want MH400 to die.
30 45%
Limitations of human communications / I do not want MH400 to die.
11 17%
It is impossible - humans have excellent communication skills / I want MH400 to die.
17 26%
It is impossible - humans have excellent communication skills / I do not want MH400 to die.
8 12%
Voters: 66.
#1
How do you describe a colour to a blind person that has never seen anything in their life? They have no idea what dark or light means. Impossible, right?

Is this inability to describe colours due to limitations of human communication? Or is it just ... impossible?
RIP Tom Searle.
#2
Also, when blind people think... what do they 'see' in their mind?
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Quote by jsync
And I've eaten at some of Australia's best pizzerias.



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#4
Obviously use other senses to describe them. Like red is a warm colour, blue is cold, black is like the soundless, cold void.

I also don't understand the poll at all, except the latter parts of the poll options.
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#6
Quote by Portuguese_boy
One time I almost OD'ed on creatine and saw colours that don't even exist.



dat der celltech
RIP Tom Searle.
#7
I mean color doesn't really exist. Our bodies simply process different frequencies of a *small* portion of the electromagnetic spectrum as color. You could describe the way in which electromagnetic radiation is stimulating the cells at the back of the retina to produce signals which are then interpreted by the brain as colours.

/pit science.
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Quote by jsync
And I've eaten at some of Australia's best pizzerias.



SOUNDCLOUD
. com / fancy-elle
#8
Quote by Julz127
I mean color doesn't really exist. Our bodies simply process different frequencies of a *small* portion of the electromagnetic spectrum as color. You could describe the way in which electromagnetic radiation is stimulating the cells at the back of the retina to produce signals which are then interpreted by the brain as colours.

/pit science.

shut up bunghole
#10
Quote by Julz127
I mean color doesn't really exist. Our bodies simply process different frequencies of a *small* portion of the electromagnetic spectrum as color. You could describe the way in which electromagnetic radiation is stimulating the cells at the back of the retina to produce signals which are then interpreted by the brain as colours.

/pit science.


But what point is it to tell a blind person that the colour green has 560–490 nm as a wavelength?
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#11
Quote by WantsLesPaul
shut up bunghole




Are you threatening me?
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Quote by jsync
And I've eaten at some of Australia's best pizzerias.



SOUNDCLOUD
. com / fancy-elle
#12
The only way to describe a colour is to describe emotions and events which are commonly referenced towards them.
I Like Orange......

Wobble Wobble Wub Wub Dakka Dakka
#13
Quote by Julz127


Are you threatening me?

He's finnish, he is too socially awkward to actually come close to you anyway.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#15
I thought he was referencing Cornholio.
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Quote by jsync
And I've eaten at some of Australia's best pizzerias.



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. com / fancy-elle
#16
Quote by sam b
Pretty sure a blind person wouldnt give a shit what green looks like




But really. Really...what do blind people see when they trip balls on psychedelics?
Some people like cupcakes exclusively, while myself, I say there is naught nor ought there be nothing so exalted on the face of God's grey Earth as that prince of foods:



the muffin!
#17
Quote by sebastian_96


But really. Really...what do blind people see when they trip balls on psychedelics?


Doesn't matter what they see, they taste color.
#18
its not colours though. Try explaining sounds to a deaf person or smell to voldemort. ergo, all senses are relative
#20
The movie "Mask", with Eric Stolz did this. Stolz' character had a crush on a blind girl, and he figured out a way to describe colors to her. An ice cube was blue, a cotton ball was white, a leaf was green, a hot rock was red, and when it cooled down, it was pink.
I'd like to help, but not as much as I'd like not to.


"To be successful, you need to be a good musician. To be popular, you just need to be fashionable" - Ritchie Blackmore
#21
Blue is like riding your bike and feeling the wind on your face, red is like the sky at sunset.

a million ****ing points to anyone who gets the reference.
#23
Without wanting to sound insensitive, blind people don't need to understand colours, like sighted people don't need to understand things in the ultraviolet spectrum. Blind people have a completely different way of describing and understanding different emotions, objects and scenarios. (I think)
#24
The words we use to represent what we perceive as colour, are descriptive words in themselves. To say that something is red and not green, is a contrast similar to saying something is rough and not smooth.

The only difference is, you could make a blind person feel the difference between rough and smooth. Describing colour to a blind person is pointless.

If they've been blind since birth and have NO perception of colour. Even describing it as "warm" or "cold" won't make them think of the actual colour.
#26
Get a panda to describe colors to the blinde dudes.
WARNING:
The above is most likely sarcasm, so fuck yourself if you're offended.
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Hey look! An intelligent post!
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One time I saw a religious person eating so I don't do that anymore.
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Save water. Drink alcohol.
#27
Quote by vagelier
its not colours though. Try explaining sounds to a deaf person


The difficulty there lies in that they can't hear a ****ing word you are saying.
#28
well theirs also the possibility that we all see completely different colors...we just call them the same thing ( you see a blue orange, i see a yellow orange, but we've both been taught that the color that the orange is..is orange)
Quote by WantsLesPaul
You are a sick man, Riley.
#29
Quote by CrAzY-RiLeY
well theirs also the possibility that we all see completely different colors...we just call them the same thing ( you see a blue orange, i see a yellow orange, but we've both been taught that the color that the orange is..is orange)


Don't start that, there was a thread about it which just turned into a large argument.
#30
Quote by Telecaster7
Don't start that, there was a thread about it which just turned into a large argument.


too late
Quote by WantsLesPaul
You are a sick man, Riley.
#32
Some guy in my speech class had to give a speech describing the color red to a blind person. Needless to say it was hilarious and terrible.
#33
Seeing blue is like feeling cool smooth water from a distance. The darker shades are slightly sad, and feel very deep. The lighter shades are a bit more frail.
Quote by Saint78
That's forever imprinted in my brain in Dwight's voice. Seriously.

Voted UG's best threadstarter 2014.
#34
The issue is that language is formed to fit demand, and there is no need whatsoever for the description of colour, as when you say red to someone they either know exactly what red is, because they have been taught the colours and can see, or they don't because they haven't been taught or they're blind. Colour is an entirely relative system that relies on the sense, without the sense then there's no need for it. You're attempting to describe something which is a scale to somebody who lacks a reference point.

And, the whole 'blue is cold, red is warm' thing is almost entirely semiotic, and so couldn't be used.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.