#1
Me and my friend would like to perform at a show in our school, but the thing is - we don't have a bassist and a drummer , we'd like to improvise some blues, but that gives us the only choice then.. backing track.Do you think that is a stupid idea?Some people say all instruments should be playing live and backing track would just look stupid.We'd like to show our guitar skills and don't really have any other options, just the backing track..
#2
If that's all you've got, use it. Make sure it's a decent quality backing track though.

It's not like you're doing a huge gig at a major stadium, you're doing a performance at your school. Just by doing the performance you'll get a lot of credit.

Also, there's a good chance there will be bassists & drummers at your school that you don't know about - doing the gig may help them find you.
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#4
Quote by zilvis89
Me and my friend would like to perform at a show in our school, but the thing is - we don't have a bassist and a drummer , we'd like to improvise some blues, but that gives us the only choice then.. backing track.Do you think that is a stupid idea?Some people say all instruments should be playing live and backing track would just look stupid.We'd like to show our guitar skills and don't really have any other options, just the backing track..


Don't you have one other option:

One of you plays rhythm while the other is a lead, and you trade off as appropriate?

Honestly, that's likely to be FAR more interesting than you guys jamming over a backing track.
#5
Quote by HotspurJr
Don't you have one other option:

One of you plays rhythm while the other is a lead, and you trade off as appropriate?

Honestly, that's likely to be FAR more interesting than you guys jamming over a backing track.



I would highly suggest this.
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#6
Quote by HotspurJr
Don't you have one other option:

One of you plays rhythm while the other is a lead, and you trade off as appropriate?

Honestly, that's likely to be FAR more interesting than you guys jamming over a backing track.

Yes , as one is soloing , other plays rhythm and we switch roles from time to time.But we need a drummer , who we couldn't really find.. that is the problem.
Last edited by zilvis89 at Feb 25, 2012,
#7
Quote by HotspurJr
Don't you have one other option:

One of you plays rhythm while the other is a lead, and you trade off as appropriate?

Honestly, that's likely to be FAR more interesting than you guys jamming over a backing track.

They still wouldn't have bass & drums, so they would actually be far LESS interesting without a backing track to provide those extra parts.
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#8
I don't know that you do need a drummer. I mean, look, don't get me wrong, there are some genres where drums aren't negotiable.

But how is blues one of them?

I would say blues is one of the genres where a bass and drums are the least necessary. And the rigidity forced by using a backing track isn't just worse than a real drummer ... but it also is often worse than what two other musicians can come up with just playing off each other and being fluid.

Now, obviously, I guess the TS and his friend have been practicing with a backing track. So they may not know how to do it without one. But would you say that, for example, these guys need a drummer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4xVj8H3jZTU

Drums are great. But unless the goal is to have people get up and dance, they're hardly necessary.
#9
Quote by HotspurJr

I would say blues is one of the genres where a bass and drums are the least necessary. And the rigidity forced by using a backing track isn't just worse than a real drummer ... but it also is often worse than what two other musicians can come up with just playing off each other and being fluid.


Sure that depends entirely on what kind of Blues you're playing.
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#10
I have done some performances at school, and believe me, no one really "understands" blues. 99% of people don't know enough about improvisation to really appreciate it.
#11
The teachers love it though.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#12
Quote by snubbie
I have done some performances at school, and believe me, no one really "understands" blues. 99% of people don't know enough about improvisation to really appreciate it.


It's not about "understanding" anything, if people like it, they'll like it. If it's crap, they probably won't like it.

And if by "know enough about improvisation" you mean "appreciate 3-5 minutes of random playing that goes nowhere", it's more likely they'll dislike it because it is "3-5 minutes of random playing that goes nowhere", rather than the average listener lacking the knowledge of blues scales and emphasising chord tones.
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#13
my opinion would be this.

i have played gigs with just me and my buddy ( keyboard player ).

You have to make the most of what you got in everything man.

i think you should work with what you got, u always need rythem and lead. so give the positions out. there is no shame in rythem, and there is no shame in lead. both is need when it comes to a some. what i said might take a couple days to get used to but its worth it trust me
#14
Quote by HotspurJr
I would say blues is one of the genres where a bass and drums are the least necessary.

If they were playing to an audience of blues aficionados, I'd agree. I'd say break out the acoustic guitars and just have the two of them on stage jamming.

They aren't though - they're playing to their school. A school audience is very different to a blues audience. The school audience is going to be far more used to listening to commercial music which includes drum and bass, and they would just think something was missing if they didn't hear it.
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#15
Quote by GaryBillington

They aren't though - they're playing to their school. A school audience is very different to a blues audience. The school audience is going to be far more used to listening to commercial music which includes drum and bass, and they would just think something was missing if they didn't hear it.


Well if they were actually performing well-known songs, then I'd say yes.

But if they're trying to get up there and improvise, well ...

Who knows, really. I suspect ALan is right, that they want to do a few minutes of playing around in scales and call it improvisation. In that case, a drum track might be the right choice because it will make it moderately less pointless. Getting the two of them to play only with each other was a (probably futile) attempt to get them to actually think about what they were going to play and create music.

Rather than, "Hey, let's throw on the blues backing track in E and wail."
#17
Quote by HotspurJr
Well if they were actually performing well-known songs, then I'd say yes.

But if they're trying to get up there and improvise, well ...

Who knows, really. I suspect ALan is right, that they want to do a few minutes of playing around in scales and call it improvisation. In that case, a drum track might be the right choice because it will make it moderately less pointless. Getting the two of them to play only with each other was a (probably futile) attempt to get them to actually think about what they were going to play and create music.

Rather than, "Hey, let's throw on the blues backing track in E and wail."

The former would require a lot more skill, discipline, and time investment. It's not something they can effectively change days before the event, nah mean?
#18
Play without a backing track. A full band isn't always necessary, especially for playing the blues.