#1
Excuse my ignorance, but why would anybody use built-in effects if they have a multi-effects unit? Also why do some people prefer pedals over multi-effects?
#2
One word: Preference.

Everybody has different opinions about these things and everyone likes working in a different way.

Multi effects are likely to be slightly more flexible than built in effects, but if you get the sound you want with the built in effects then there's no point trying to recreate that sound in another way.

Single pedals are a slightly different discussion - as a general rule, they will provide a better quality effect than a multi effects unit as they are focussed on a single job, multi effects units are more a 'jack of all trades, master of none'.

If someone has a very specific sound they are after, they are probably better off with individual pedals, whereas if someone just wants a range of effects to be available to them they are better off with a multi effects unit.
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#3
For the first one I had no idea.

Pedals usually have a better sound, and you can get analog gear too, which is pretty rare in multi effects. Also people like being able to swap around their own favourite effect, for instance a flanger, with a multi effect pedal you get at most 3 flangers to choose from, but by using individual pedals you can choose any flanger you want. Also a lot of people just want to be old school and use "retro" gear. Although you find pretty quickly that most people who gig a lot end up using multi effect systems pretty quick, especially if your hitting the road
#4
Quote by danresn
For the first one I had no idea.

Although you find pretty quickly that most people who gig a lot end up using multi effect systems pretty quick, especially if your hitting the road


I experience the opposite. The longer a players live experience the less likely will you see a multi. Thats what I observe.
#5
Correct me if I'm wrong. Pedals and amp built-in effects are analog, while most multi-effects are digital, and this is why Multi-FX are more flexible, yet produce effects of a lower quality.
#6
Quote by ahesham
Correct me if I'm wrong. Pedals and amp built-in effects are analog, while most multi-effects are digital, and this is why Multi-FX are more flexible, yet produce effects of a lower quality.

Pedals can be digital too, it is more the quality thing. I would say flexibility price and weight against quality, collecting addiction and fun.
#7
Preference. Everything is preference. To each their own.
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#9
Digital = most of the pedals DigiTech make, apart from their HardWire series.
Analogue = almost everything BOSS makes.

Bear in mind that for distortion/overdrive (and very rarely, tremolo and delay), there's solid state analogue and valve (tube) analog. Usually when guitarists talk about 'analogue' and 'digital' they're rather stupidly defining each as valve and solid state only, but really solid state and digital are not the same thing. So you have to make that distinction when talking about pedals, where all three types are commonly found. This gets even more confusing when companies use terms like 'valve' and 'tube' to describe how a pedal sounds, but not necessarily how it works. An Ibanez Tubescreamer is a solid state pedal, but it is not a digital pedal nor a valve pedal. The DigiTech Valve Distortion is an analogue pedal, but it does not actually use a valve. The Mesa V-Twin distortion pedal is analogue pedal and it does use a valve.

Basically, there are thousands of different pedals out there and they all work slightly differently. It's not simple to give an example of what any style of pedal sounds like or why someone would use one type over another because there are just too many variations that all sound different.
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#10
Quote by cdr_salamander
Preference. Everything is preference. To each their own.

This is the answer to almost every thread.
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#11
I thought at first I wouldn't care but I'm finding out that I really want to switch to pedals. I've had my Vox VT for about a year and I don't think I have even used all the effects and models yet, there are just soooo many combinations, its overwhelming. It sounds OK and gets me by, but I'm picking up a small watt tube amp and getting some pedals. Plug and play is a lot simpler. With my VT I have to hunt around for different settings, all the while the volume changes from soft to ear bleeding depending on the effect/model. I have to reset the effects knobs when I switch anything. It's time consuming and annoying.
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#12
Its preferance, also cost. a multi effects will cost you more in the short term, whereas you can take time piecing together a pedal board with effects you actually use.

I flip flop betweent the 2, but for the last couple years I've been on a pedal board for these reasons:

I only have the effects I want, so simplicity.
I can drop down and change an effect on the fly much easier than in a multi effect.
If I stop using, or dislike 1 effect, I can always swap it for another or just sell it.
I prefer simplicity.

Benefits of a multieffect?
portablility.
fewer points of failure. 1 powersupply and 1 input and 1 output jack. Each pedal on a board has a cable which can fail, and a power plug that can get loose. so another investment into a good pedal board is necessary.


each side has pros and cons. my recommendation for a beginner is to start with an inexpencive multi effects like the korg ax10g or the digitech rps and then pick up pedals for sounds that you actually use.

something like that
#13
amp fx tend to have very limited parameters so they aren't very tweakable. multi-fx units depending on the quality have more options so are often considered "better" than the fx built into amps.

as for pedals they do offer way more variety in terms of any given effect. of course they are also more of a one trick pony (often not a bad thing though). as already mentioned pedals tend to have better sound quality and you can change them out for something else very easily. with a multi-fx unit what you have is what you are stuck with. for me i use pedals and keep things pretty simple for live performance. i want my tone to be very specific so pedals work far better in this case.
#14
So why do people buy expensive amps when they are going to use external effects anyway?
#15
^I'm not sure what you mean. 95-99% of amps out there don't have any built in FX - pretty much only modeling amps do.
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#16
What does built-in effects mean ?

The effects on combo-modelling amps like the peavey vypyr - are those built-in effects ?
#17
Quote by joey78
What does built-in effects mean ?

The effects on combo-modelling amps like the peavey vypyr - are those built-in effects ?

Yes. They're effects which are built in to the amp, as opposed to effects controlled by an external unit.
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#18
Quote by joey78
What does built-in effects mean ?

The effects on combo-modelling amps like the peavey vypyr - are those built-in effects ?

Pedals are analog(the typical boss pedals). The Vypyr is digital. There will be a difference in sound, but Peavey has put a lot of time into their digital effects to make them sound like the real deal, so they aren't too bad.

A multifx pedal is also digital, so therefore there is not a huge difference in quality, just preference. I believe when it comes to distortions, the Vypyr's onboard modeling is far better than my ME70. The pedal and preamp emulation just doesn't compare, imo, I think thats because Peavey does digital effects better than Boss and because they put better hardware in the Vypyr.
#19
Quote by W4RP1G
Pedals are analog(the typical boss pedals). The Vypyr is digital. There will be a difference in sound, but Peavey has put a lot of time into their digital effects to make them sound like the real deal, so they aren't too bad.

A multifx pedal is also digital, so therefore there is not a huge difference in quality, just preference. I believe when it comes to distortions, the Vypyr's onboard modeling is far better than my ME70. The pedal and preamp emulation just doesn't compare, imo, I think thats because Peavey does digital effects better than Boss and because they put better hardware in the Vypyr.
You can get regular pedals that are digital, and multi-FX that are analogue (though these are ridiculously expensive). What is analogue and what is digital is not as black & white as many people think.
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