#1
Okay so I'm in a metalcore band, we play pretty thrashy, fast riffs, but after repeating a fast riff my wrist gets really stiff and I can't help but decrease tempo. Is there a specific way to stop this from happening?
#2
Is your guitar at a somewhat suitable angle?
Quote by luxeion
i keep asking my dad for wood. but he keeps getting annoyed (he's working on a house). and i'm too young to go outside.

#4
Is it awkward for your wrist? It ain't bent at weird angles like the other guy who opened doors with his hand at like a 90 degree twist, is it?
Quote by luxeion
i keep asking my dad for wood. but he keeps getting annoyed (he's working on a house). and i'm too young to go outside.

#5
do you stretch after warming up and before you start playing properly?
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#6
Quote by Sign of War
do you stretch after warming up and before you start playing properly?

Nope, but I can play slower riffs fine, its just the ones with alot of fast tremolo picking and really fast chugging between the E and A strings makes my picking hand really stiff
#7
I'd have to say, the only thing you could do there, is just like practice lots of Parkway, or just alt pick them.
Quote by luxeion
i keep asking my dad for wood. but he keeps getting annoyed (he's working on a house). and i'm too young to go outside.

#8
Make sure your arm isn't doing any excessive movement. The tremolo picking is more in the wrist, with it being firmly glued to the guitar body. If your arms is jumping up and about experiencing pain is pretty normal. If you still have no idea what to do just discuss it with another guitar player in person so he can actually see your hands as you play, he might figure something out. Other than that, just do stretches and practice at a slower tempo, gradually building up speed.
#9
Your arm and wrist are just getting tired. it happens to me too when I play really fast riffs for a long period of time. What I do is just practice the riffs that tire me out to try to build endurance. I wouldn't say you are doing anything wrong at all, you just need to condition your wrist/forearm to do it longer.
#10
Quote by risk182
Make sure your arm isn't doing any excessive movement. The tremolo picking is more in the wrist, with it being firmly glued to the guitar body. If your arms is jumping up and about experiencing pain is pretty normal. If you still have no idea what to do just discuss it with another guitar player in person so he can actually see your hands as you play, he might figure something out. Other than that, just do stretches and practice at a slower tempo, gradually building up speed.

No.

You never "glue" any part of your body to the guitar; that's just gonna create unnecessary tension. Tremolo picking is very possible with a loose and non-glued hand. What matters is that you practice getting optimally small pick strokes and minimal tension.

Quote by metalcoredude39
Okay so I'm in a metalcore band, we play pretty thrashy, fast riffs, but after repeating a fast riff my wrist gets really stiff and I can't help but decrease tempo. Is there a specific way to stop this from happening?

There are two potential reasons for you getting stiff:
1.) You're getting tired. That's really common after playing really fast stuff and happens to everyone. It's all a matter of building stamina and not forcing yourself to go too fast for too long; otherwise, you'll risk injuring your wrist and forearm, which is really, mucho grande bad.
2.) You've got too much tension in your wrist, which is very possible. If you're pushing yourself to play at faster tempos, you might be tightening your arm up too much, which creates a ton of tension and can ruin your arm.

One or both of those is almost certainly the case. Practice relaxing your arm when you practice (and make sure to practice at a slow tempo rather than full speed when you're on your own). Before you practice with your band mates, make sure to warm up properly and massage your forearm in between songs. That helps to keep your muscles loose and comfortable and relieves some of the built-up tension and stiffness.