#1
sure in some of the songs he did (orion, the call of ktulu, anesthesia) but in metal you cant really have a lead bass. i'm wondering because when people talk about lead bass i never thought about putting cliff burtons name in there but i saw the earlier thread about a bass being a lead instrument and saw his name thrown in there.

IMO, hes not really a lead player.

Discuss i wanna hear other peoples' opinions.
#2
He played bass in a band called Slayer and they released a Fistful of Metal in 1987 with sich classic songs as Whiplash
#3
Why can't you have lead bass in metal? And you've already said he did play lead bass on a few songs, surely that makes your question somewhat redundant?
My Soundcloud
Always up for some C4C, been compared to Frank Turner, The Cure's Robert Smith and Bruce Springsteen so check out my stuff if you like the sound of that
Last edited by Paddy McK at Feb 26, 2012,
#6
Billy Sheehan is one of the few who I would consider "lead bass"

Cliff Burton is absurdly overrated because he is dead. I'm not denying his abilities but I'm not gonna sugar-coat either
#7
Quote by SilverSpurs616
Billy Sheehan is one of the few who I would consider "lead bass"

Cliff Burton is absurdly overrated because he is dead. I'm not denying his abilities but I'm not gonna sugar-coat either


exactly what i was trying to say. im a diehard metallica fan and i think hes overrated. i hate when people say he played lead bass, cuz he really didnt other than like 3 songs.
#8
Using the word 'lead' in regards to any instrument is inaccurate IMO. Sure you can solo on an instrument, but that doesn't mean it leads the band.
Quote by skater dan0
Damn you and your ninja-like modding
#9
Quote by fleajr_1412
Using the word 'lead' in regards to any instrument is inaccurate IMO. Sure you can solo on an instrument, but that doesn't mean it leads the band.


Let us not bring semantics into this, you know what he is talking about. Though your point is also valid
#10
Metallica didn't have bass as a lead instrument. It got solos but considering other bands and other genres, well it's not comparable is it? out of the whole Burton/Metallica discography how long do would you consider it as having lead bass? 5-8 minutes max out of three albums(minimum total playtime 120 minutes) so that's about 4-7% of the time, might as well call Lars a lead drummer with the fills he put in.
Yes Cliff Burton was capable of playing lead bass, no he didn't play lead bass in Metallica, he had a very aggressive style for the time. Anyhow this all comes down to what you consider lead bass and lead in general.
Quote by Tyson2011
when in doubt, adjust the truss rod.

Sfedf the First ...
or should it be the insane?
#11
Quote by fleajr_1412
Using the word 'lead' in regards to any instrument is inaccurate IMO. Sure you can solo on an instrument, but that doesn't mean it leads the band.



Came here to say this.
#12
Solo riffs usually lead into other parts of songs.
Main Basses:
Warwick RB Corvette 5
Douglas Sculptor 825 NA Fretless 5


Main Rig:
Sansamp>GK Backline 600>2 GK BLX 210 Cabinets
#13
Alright, Cliff Burton may not have played Lead Bass, but John Bottom played Moby Dick for REAL
Quote by Banjocal
sht up u flthy librl foogit stfu u soo mad n butthurdt ur ass is an analpocolypse cuz ur so gay "my ass hrts so mcuh" - u. your rectally vexed n anlly angushed lolo go bck 2 asslnd lolol
#14
Quote by sfedf1
he had a very aggressive style for the time. Anyhow this all comes down to what you consider lead bass and lead in general.


I agree, and I hate metallica and all thrash, just to lead with that (pun intended).

There are a lot of attributes to "lead", from a purely guitar standpoint, things that seem to indicate lead are

the melodic center of the song aside from vocals
extreme complexity
Loudest of the guitars
lots of or lack of effects
leads the song
single note picking over chords
Speed and amount of notes


Usually in most stuff I listen to usually "lead" might only pertain, during a solo, as mostly it's just two guitarists playing different parts, neither really out doing the other. Smashing Pumpkins and Franz Ferdinand come to mind in these instances. In both bands regardless of technicality of the music itself, both guitarists blend and swerve around each other creating a woven texture of sound.

Now, you could get a mile long pedal board, get a 1200 watt power amp, play fast, and complex, and disregard the fact the drummer exists, but who wants that?

And that I think is why some of us (at least me) get kind of confused/exasperated when people come here asking/arguing about lead of any kind, is because generally it's metal heads who want to be dime bag on bass, but then they get advice from people who elect more virtuoso melodic "clean" bass styles like Jaco; or people who call Om lead bass cause he's the only stringed instrument left. In the end everyone has a different idea of lead.

Luther Perkins was Johnny Cash's lead guitarist, Kirk Hammett is Metallica's, sound anything alike?

Really in the end it's the listener who determines what is lead(ing) them along/or what to focus on. I for one when listening to music tend to find myself focusing mostly on the lyrics and rhythm while any lead guitar work tends to get dropped unless particularly interesting.
#16
Quote by Revocati0n
He played bass in a band called Slayer and they released a Fistful of Metal in 1987 with sich classic songs as Whiplash




This!
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115