#1
I dont understand, most guitars build for metal and rock have jumbo and big frets and most bluesy and jazz guitars have small frets...This doesnt make any sense to me...
#2
Larger frets get your closer to the scallopped fretboard feel, which is popular for lead guitar work in all the metal/rock crowd. Smaller frets are just plain better for chordwork, and as far as guitar manufacturers are concerned that is all you will do if you are interested in blues and jazz. So there.
#3
Most metal players like large fretwires because they don't feel the fingerboard beneath their fingertips. It makes vibrato easier for some. But i'm a metal player and i dislike excessively large frets. So having big fretwires is very much a matter of taste.

Quote by Kikuta
Smaller frets are just plain better for chordwork,and as far as guitar manufacturers are concerned that is all you will do if you are interested in blues and jazz. So there.


nope. a lot of jazz is arpeggiated lines.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Feb 26, 2012,
#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
nope. a lot of jazz is arpeggiated lines.


Y'think?
#5
Quote by Kikuta
Y'think?

Then why did you make the statement if you knew it was wrong?
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#6
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Then why did you make the statement if you knew it was wrong?


Quote by Kikuta
as far as guitar manufacturers are concerned


How do I sarcasm? ¯\(°_o)/¯
#7
Okay first of all: that last exchange

Second: It's because jumbo frets tend to make bending and vibrato a bit easier (and yes, there is a considerable difference. My LTD 7 string has much wider and higher frets than my Epiphone Les Paul and it's much easier to bend and do vibrato on, even tuned up half a step) whereas smaller frets (apparently, I never really noticed too much of a difference) make chords easier to finger.
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Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#8
this is one thing that doesn't matter to me at all. i do not know why so many people are set on one thing and can't do anything else.

you hear the time, what scale length is better? what guage of strings should i buy?

none of these issues have any bearing on me. i can go from blues on guitar leads riffing whatever, pick my prestige up and do the same thing heavy leads on ibby can be done on the Les Paul minus maybe a bar or two over a period of a few minutes.

you need to be versatile. it makes you a better guitarist.

you guitar is in the shop and you have a gig and borrow a friends, do you cancel the gig because his guitar has vintage sized frets and is 24.75" scale and a 12" radius?

/trashed.
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#9
Quote by trashedlostfdup
this is one thing that doesn't matter to me at all. i do not know why so many people are set on one thing and can't do anything else.

you hear the time, what scale length is better? what guage of strings should i buy?

none of these issues have any bearing on me. i can go from blues on guitar leads riffing whatever, pick my prestige up and do the same thing heavy leads on ibby can be done on the Les Paul minus maybe a bar or two over a period of a few minutes.

you need to be versatile. it makes you a better guitarist.

you guitar is in the shop and you have a gig and borrow a friends, do you cancel the gig because his guitar has vintage sized frets and is 24.75" scale and a 12" radius?

/trashed.


This sort of shit might not matter to the average guitarist, but anyone with any idea what they're doing that tours or does a lot of studio work is going to be concerned by it.
#10
Quote by Kikuta
This sort of shit might not matter to the average guitarist, but anyone with any idea what they're doing that tours or does a lot of studio work is going to be concerned by it.


False. Anyone who tours or does a lot of studio work wouldn't (shouldn't) be such a picky bastard and will play what they need to play to get their job done. That's their job. If you worked at McDonalds, you can't complain about using the fryer because it uses vegetable oil, and you only work with canola oil....
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#11
Quote by LaidBack
False. Anyone who tours or does a lot of studio work wouldn't (shouldn't) be such a picky bastard and will play what they need to play to get their job done. That's their job. If you worked at McDonalds, you can't complain about using the fryer because it uses vegetable oil, and you only work with canola oil....


Are you fucking kidding? Let me rephrase: anyone that even considers themselves to be a professional will be concerned by it. I don't know anyone that tours yearly that is happy to use 'whatever is there'. You use something you know how to play properly. You won't meet a studio engineer that will let you bring a 25.5" guitar tuned to A standard to record on. We don't need to go into the 'which tuners / bridge / scale stays in tune best for x tuning' debacle, but don't go saying that none of it matters at all and any old piece of shit will do the job fine. If you're going to do something in the industry, you do it well, not 'good enough'.
#12
Read one of trashedlostfdup's posts:

you guitar is in the shop and you have a gig and borrow a friends, do you cancel the gig because his guitar has vintage sized frets and is 24.75" scale and a 12" radius?


I'm not saying that a studio guitarist is going to be playing any old crap that's laying around, just saying, a touring/studio musician worth his weight is able to play any guitar available, and play it well, regardless of the physical specifications
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#13
It's all preference. Some guys will play metal on tiny frets and some guys will play nothing but chords and like extra jumbos. It's all preference and I'm surprised so many people are arguing about it. What's good for one person isn't necessarily good for all of them. That said, metal and lead players in general prefer larger frets because they tend to aid in feel as they make the string sit high enough off of the fretboard when fretted that it never touches the board. I know that when I play I prefer larger fretwire and I feel more comfortable and play better and more consistently with a larger fret.
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#14
I like larger frets, but my preferred guitar for lead playing is a Tele, which, while having good sized frets, has fairly normal fret wire. I play a lot of legato style leads, and I use normal and small frets with very little hassle. If I am doing fast, sticatto style playing, I will opt for a guitar with larger frets, but in most cases whichever guitar is handiest is the one I will grab. There is a difference, but I can't see a studio musician making that their first consideration when grabbing a guitar. I would imagine that a proficient studio musician would prefer different fret sizes for different situations, as most people do.
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#15
That argument was ridiculous. Any professional guitarist, or even any serious guitarist would never go to record or play a show without at least one backup. It's a non issue, since that kind of scenario would never happen.

If you do anything borderline professional involving the guitar without a backup, you're just an idiot.
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#16
Quote by Offworld92
That argument was ridiculous. Any professional guitarist, or even any serious guitarist would never go to record or play a show without at least one backup. It's a non issue, since that kind of scenario would never happen.

If you do anything borderline professional involving the guitar without a backup, you're just an idiot.


Agreed.
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