#2
Goals?
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#3
Mmm...
I don't I have one.
I mean, yes. But like everyone, speed, melodic control, good technique, good ear (I train my ears everyday anyway)... and that stuff.
I would love to play melodic rock, instrumental rock, jazz fusion.
#4
1. Learn how to play Nyan Cat;
2. Practise slowly;
3. Increase speed slowly;
4. Profit!
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#7
Quote by Dayn
1. Learn how to play Nyan Cat;
2. Practise slowly;
3. Increase speed slowly;
4. Profit!


lol, freak
#8
I have a routine that takes about 3 and a half hours a day and covers most techniques and theory in a 21 day cycle. Each day I have a specific area in which I work and after 21 days I am back to the beginning. If interested I would love to share.
#9
First things first, how is your theory?
I'll give you a basic routine, assuming you have a bit of theory down.

The best thing to do before you pick up the guitar is to stretch. ESPECIALLY if you plan to practice a long time period. A normal stretch routine should last a couple of minutes. Make sure you stretch completely. Don't half-ass it.

From there you should move on to warm-ups. Get a metronome and work on right hand exercises, left hand exercises, and on getting both your hands coordinated more. Usually for me to run through a bunch of exercises properly with a metronome (starting slow, and bumping it up 8bpm every time I'm sure I played it clean) takes me about an hour.

From there I work on improvising. I find a nice backing track on Youtube or record one myself on Audacity (and loop it), and work on getting good improvisation. When I'm content with the one I got, I'll move on to one that is completely different (for example, go from a dark Jazz backing track to a Pop Ballad or Thrash Metal track. Something different.) That usually takes me about 20-30 minutes.

Then I work on my legato and sweeping, usually just making up small medleys that allow me to practice them both without a problem. It keeps it a lot more interesting. You can add more techniques you want to get better at in this area and keep it going for as long as you want.
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#10
Quote by WesCThomp
I have a routine that takes about 3 and a half hours a day and covers most techniques and theory in a 21 day cycle. Each day I have a specific area in which I work and after 21 days I am back to the beginning. If interested I would love to share.


I'd be down to take a look at that if you don't mind
#11
Quote by WesCThomp
I have a routine that takes about 3 and a half hours a day and covers most techniques and theory in a 21 day cycle. Each day I have a specific area in which I work and after 21 days I am back to the beginning. If interested I would love to share.


I'd like to see it, please.


Quote by maxmetalero
First things first, how is your theory?
I'll give you a basic routine, assuming you have a bit of theory down.

The best thing to do before you pick up the guitar is to stretch. ESPECIALLY if you plan to practice a long time period. A normal stretch routine should last a couple of minutes. Make sure you stretch completely. Don't half-ass it.

From there you should move on to warm-ups. Get a metronome and work on right hand exercises, left hand exercises, and on getting both your hands coordinated more. Usually for me to run through a bunch of exercises properly with a metronome (starting slow, and bumping it up 8bpm every time I'm sure I played it clean) takes me about an hour.

From there I work on improvising. I find a nice backing track on Youtube or record one myself on Audacity (and loop it), and work on getting good improvisation. When I'm content with the one I got, I'll move on to one that is completely different (for example, go from a dark Jazz backing track to a Pop Ballad or Thrash Metal track. Something different.) That usually takes me about 20-30 minutes.

Then I work on my legato and sweeping, usually just making up small medleys that allow me to practice them both without a problem. It keeps it a lot more interesting. You can add more techniques you want to get better at in this area and keep it going for as long as you want.


I don't really like work on improvising, I mean. I like make some improvs, but I don't like to use them in a routine.
#12
1. Learn songs you like, preferably by ear. METRONOME!
2. Play along to original song, listen for dynamics and such. Try to find out why it sounds the way it does (music theory wise)
3. Change it up, do a version of it in another genre or key. Maybe use it as inspiration for a completely new song or smaller theme. Just take that inner muse for a ride and let your creativity flow. Nothing is wrong. All is awesome, Music is awesome.
4. Keep it fun. Even if you feel very motivated right now, practicing without having fun is the road to the rut. And if you're having fun you won't even look at it as practice, more like having fun and getting good while you're at it.

This will work on all aspects you need as a musician and is far superior to whatever technique drill for x hours that you ever will find. You will be very well rounded having worked simultaneously on ear training, technique, repertoire, composing skills, a little theory and just overall mastery of the guitar and music in general. Also, as this is very varied and stimulates the musical side of you too, you are more likely to keep at it for longer and more consistently than other "practice routines", meaning more practice time.
You'll Never Walk Alone!
#13
Quote by Muffinz
1. Learn songs you like, preferably by ear. METRONOME!
2. Play along to original song, listen for dynamics and such. Try to find out why it sounds the way it does (music theory wise)
3. Change it up, do a version of it in another genre or key. Maybe use it as inspiration for a completely new song or smaller theme. Just take that inner muse for a ride and let your creativity flow. Nothing is wrong. All is awesome, Music is awesome.
4. Keep it fun. Even if you feel very motivated right now, practicing without having fun is the road to the rut. And if you're having fun you won't even look at it as practice, more like having fun and getting good while you're at it.

This will work on all aspects you need as a musician and is far superior to whatever technique drill for x hours that you ever will find. You will be very well rounded having worked simultaneously on ear training, technique, repertoire, composing skills, a little theory and just overall mastery of the guitar and music in general. Also, as this is very varied and stimulates the musical side of you too, you are more likely to keep at it for longer and more consistently than other "practice routines", meaning more practice time.


I always work with my ears, but I need better technique, I feel it.