#1
I just got cubase so i hooked my M-audio mobile-pre up and used my Shure-SM57 to try to record some talking just to get used to the program. I am running into trouble when i go to record though because i am getting a horrendous buzzing and screeching noise through my headphones so i can't even hear what i am saying. I know it can't be the earphones because i checked the port and used them with other things not to mention i bought them today. What else could it be? My mic or mic cables perhaps?
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe
#2
Sounds like it could be feedback. This is caused by the mic picking up a signal, feeding it to the interface, amplifying it and sending it to the speakers. The mic picks up this signal, which is amplfied and the process starts all over. Eventually, the signal becomes large enough that feedback is heard.

To stop this from happening, deselect "monitor" in Cubase for the mic channel. You'll still be able to record, however it will interrupt this feedback loop. On my version of Cubase, this is the small, round circle with the speaker icon in it.

If you absolutely have to have this engaged, there are ways to stop or reduce the problem:

Change the mic position so that the pattern favor the monitor speakers.
Apply EQ to that channel and "ring out" your system. Determine the frequency where the problems are occuring and cut those frequencies enough to eliminate the problem. On my DAW desk, I am able to have my mics at unity without any feedback. If I need to adjust the EQs for my mics, then I use headphones to prevent feedback.

If it's not feedback, then it could be an issue with drivers to your interface, a defective interface, improper setup of Cubase, or some other problem.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Feb 27, 2012,
#3
Quote by KG6_Steven
Sounds like it could be feedback. This is caused by the mic picking up a signal, feeding it to the interface, amplifying it and sending it to the speakers. The mic picks up this signal, which is amplfied and the process starts all over. Eventually, the signal becomes large enough that feedback is heard.

To stop this from happening, deselect "monitor" in Cubase for the mic channel. You'll still be able to record, however it will interrupt this feedback loop. On my version of Cubase, this is the small, round circle with the speaker icon in it.

If you absolutely have to have this engaged, there are ways to stop or reduce the problem:

Change the mic position so that the pattern favor the monitor speakers.
Apply EQ to that channel and "ring out" your system. Determine the frequency where the problems are occuring and cut those frequencies enough to eliminate the problem. On my DAW desk, I am able to have my mics at unity without any feedback. If I need to adjust the EQs for my mics, then I use headphones to prevent feedback.

If it's not feedback, then it could be an issue with drivers to your interface, a defective interface, improper setup of Cubase, or some other problem.


thanks i try this.
ESP LTD EC-1000 vintage black
sunburst fender MIM tele
Epiphone LP standard ebony
Mesa/boogie dual rectifier
Mesa/Boogie .50 caliber plus head
Marshall JCM900 Hi-gain MII 2500
Fender Hot rod Deluxe