#1
I have owned a Squier Tele Deluxe for the past 2 years. It plays great and I love it for my sort of music style (a edgy sort of indie sound in the vein of Manchester Orchestra, Colour Revolt, Brand New, Thrice). It has just your average stock single-coil pick-ups at the moment, and I've never modded it or any guitar before.
However, I feel like it could benefit from some modifications. I don't really like the sound of the bridge pick-ups, as they sound a little weak, and I would probably prefer something a little thicker, and heavier for my usually crunchy tones.
And, away from the 'upgrading' modifications of the guitar, I am experiencing some problems that need fixing. There is a static white noise kind of sound when turning the volume knob (which I believe is dust inside), I have, only recently, started to find dead notes at the top end of the fret board, which I don't know how to fix. There is also quite a bit of pickup hum, and whenever you touch the metal plate on which the volume and tone pots lie, a hum becomes really loud. Like literally just touching it with your finger.
The only pick-ups I've found, which were on a friends guitar, were Seymour Duncan Hot Rails, and they were really nice (aswell as being on a squier strat).
If anyone could recommend any pick-ups for the bridge (or the neck, I like it, but it's a little noisy), ways to eliminate hum, ways to fix the issues and just ways in general to get the guitar playing to an optimum level, would be great. I don't plan to upgrade guitar anytime soon, and I like the idea of building it up to as good as I can get it. I'm not expecting to turn it into an American Fender over night, just want it to reach it's potential.

I appreciate any help!
Last edited by Lucas-- at Feb 28, 2012,
#2
Quote by Lucas--
I have owned a Squier Tele Deluxe for the past 2 years. It plays great and I love it for my sort of music style (a edgy sort of indie sound in the vein of Manchester Orchestra, Colour Revolt, Brand New, Thrice). It has just your average stock single-coil pick-ups at the moment, and I've never modded it or any guitar before.
However, I feel like it could benefit from some modifications. I don't really like the sound of the bridge pick-ups, as they sound a little weak, and I would probably prefer something a little thicker, and heavier for my usually crunchy tones.
And, away from the 'upgrading' modifications of the guitar, I am experiencing some problems that need fixing. There is a static white noise kind of sound when turning the volume knob (which I believe is dust inside), I have, only recently, started to find dead notes at the top end of the fret board, which I don't know how to fix. There is also quite a bit of pickup hum, and whenever you touch the metal plate on which the volume and tone pots lie, a hum becomes really loud. Like literally just touching it with your finger.
The only pick-ups I've found, which were on a friends guitar, were Seymour Duncan Hot Rails, and they were really nice (aswell as being on a squier strat).
If anyone could recommend any pick-ups for the bridge (or the neck, I like it, but it's a little noisy), ways to eliminate hum, ways to fix the issues and just ways in general to get the guitar playing to an optimum level, would be great. I don't plan to upgrade guitar anytime soon, and I like the idea of building it up to as good as I can get it. I'm not expecting to turn it into an American Fender over night, just want it to reach it's potential.

I appreciate any help!


There are many different pickup brands out there, some have sound samples on their website. If you can, listen before you buy. The actual pickup swap is very simple - it could be just two wires to be unsoldered/soldered. Seymour duncan has a load of wiring diagrams on their website:
Very simple. You need to replace your potentiometer. You should probably do all three while you're replacing your pickups - they're fairly cheap to buy.
Right, this is a bit trickier. Without seeing it it's impossible to know, but sounds like it'll need either a good setup or possibly a fret dress. If you have no experience then i'd say take it to a tech for this - you could make it worse, and a re-fret is more expensive than a fret dress. If it just happens to need a good setup, then you could probably do it yourself.
This sounds like a shielding/grounding error. When replacing the pickups, try shielding the inside of the guitar. This can be done simply by lining it with kitchen foil then attatching a wire to ground. Another very easy mod. As for it getting louder when you touch it, i suspect there may be a ground wire loose. When you re-wire it, do it correctly and this will dissappear.


Now that you have an idea of what you have to do, go and research these things. If you need more info on anything, just ask .
Hope this helps!
#3
I can personally vouch for the Hot Rails. I've got one in the neck and bridge positions in my Washburn Strat copy. They thickened the tone up and added some punch.
#4
#5
Quote by minnis

There are many different pickup brands out there, some have sound samples on their website. If you can, listen before you buy. The actual pickup swap is very simple - it could be just two wires to be unsoldered/soldered. Seymour duncan has a load of wiring diagrams on their website:
Very simple. You need to replace your potentiometer. You should probably do all three while you're replacing your pickups - they're fairly cheap to buy.
Right, this is a bit trickier. Without seeing it it's impossible to know, but sounds like it'll need either a good setup or possibly a fret dress. If you have no experience then i'd say take it to a tech for this - you could make it worse, and a re-fret is more expensive than a fret dress. If it just happens to need a good setup, then you could probably do it yourself.
This sounds like a shielding/grounding error. When replacing the pickups, try shielding the inside of the guitar. This can be done simply by lining it with kitchen foil then attatching a wire to ground. Another very easy mod. As for it getting louder when you touch it, i suspect there may be a ground wire loose. When you re-wire it, do it correctly and this will dissappear.


Now that you have an idea of what you have to do, go and research these things. If you need more info on anything, just ask .
Hope this helps!

Thanks so much for this, man! Cleared up a lot of grey areas! I'll most probably go to a tech and maybe try some of the simpler stuff myself, because I have no experience, but I should be able to point out the problems better now at least.
How would I go about giving it a 'set-up' on my own?
#6
I can personally vouch for the Hot Rails. I've got one in the neck and bridge positions in my Washburn Strat copy. They thickened the tone up and Are they relatively versatile?
#7
Quote by Drache Wachter
I can personally vouch for the Hot Rails. I've got one in the neck and bridge positions in my Washburn Strat copy. They thickened the tone up and

Are they versatile? I use cleans, crunch and fuzzy big muff style sounds, and I was worried, because of the high-output aspect of them, that they may not be very versatile.
#8
Quote by Lucas--
Thanks so much for this, man! Cleared up a lot of grey areas! I'll most probably go to a tech and maybe try some of the simpler stuff myself, because I have no experience, but I should be able to point out the problems better now at least.
How would I go about giving it a 'set-up' on my own?


Np, that's what GB&C's here for .
Most of the wiring stuff is simple enough if you're just sticking with a conventional wiring. It's when you start getting into phase switching, coil tapping, series/parallel etc that it starts getting complicated. This is your standard wiring diagram:

Link

The only thing to note is that if you go for a humbucker, it will have five wires instead of two. Two of these extra wires will be taped off together, and one will go to ground with the black wire in the picture. So really, nothing major.