#1
Hi there
I just wanted to ask all of you what problems you face as a lead or rythm guitarist, both musically and personally, and epress your thoughts about rythm and lead. I don't want this turning into a war, so be nice everybody and just tell us what you think about these respective parts and roles within the band.
#2
I sound like such a noob to myself, i can imagine what i must sound like to you! But you get the idea...
#3
People seem to think lead guitar is more important than rythm guitar. If you are in a band and are not a solo guitar player like Vai or Satch, then rythym is way more important imo. A general song is probably 80-90% rythm playing and 10-20% lead. I myself am a rythm player more because I'm good with riffs and power chords and my timing with them. I can also play drums quite accurately as well. Im terrible at lead because I dont play fast enough for shredding :P Problems lead guitarists sometimes have is they think the song revolves around them when it involves everyone equally. They tend to also not be as accurate at rythm playing with their timing. Problems some rythm players like me are they are good at rythm but struggle to play lead which can be really useful say if you want to do a harmony with the lead player. Could restrict the possibilites.
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#4
as ilead guitarist i think rythm is far more important aswell, starnge i know!
#5
I'm a lead guitarist aswell, and I also think that rythm guitarists are the most important, and often the hardest to find, even though there are many guitarists out there who claims they are lead guitarists, but actually arent more than decent on lead, but on the other side are really good at rythm. I think this is because the ones claiming they are lead guitarists just don't want to give that spot to someone else, because lead is "their thing", and don't want to stick with "just" playing rythm.
#6
Quote by northbeach
I'm a lead guitarist aswell, and I also think that rythm guitarists are the most important, and often the hardest to find, even though there are many guitarists out there who claims they are lead guitarists, but actually arent more than decent on lead, but on the other side are really good at rythm. I think this is because the ones claiming they are lead guitarists just don't want to give that spot to someone else, because lead is "their thing", and don't want to stick with "just" playing rythm.


That's a true statement but it's funnier to be both like Reb Beach *cough* letting loose by Reb Beach *cough*

You should really master both though. It'll only help in the long run!
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#7
in my opinion, it's only another limitation standing in your way to even make that distinction in the first place. do what the music calls for.
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#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
in my opinion, it's only another limitation standing in your way to even make that distinction in the first place. do what the music calls for.

This.

None of you are "lead guitarists", and none of you are "rhythm guitarists". You're guitarists who have pigeonholed yourselves into specific approaches for no real reason. They're not really distinct roles at all.
Last edited by :-D at Feb 28, 2012,
#9
Quote by JimmyCraig
Hi there
I just wanted to ask all of you what problems you face as a lead or rythm guitarist, both musically and personally, and epress your thoughts about rythm and lead. I don't want this turning into a war, so be nice everybody and just tell us what you think about these respective parts and roles within the band.


I've never faced any problems as a lead or rhythm guitarist. Definitely come across ego problems when it comes to lead vs rhythm guitar, but that was always a matter of maturity. (or lack of).

Don't worry about "roles". That's just fodder for pointless debates, you're better off just playing your guitar and appreciating it for what it is.
shred is gaudy music
#10
Quote by :-D
This.

None of you are "lead guitarists", and none of you are "rhythm guitarists". You're guitarists who have pigeonholed yourselves into specific approaches for no real reason. They're not really distinct roles at all.

but surely most people are better at one than at the other?
#12
Quote by JimmyCraig
but surely most people are better at one than at the other?

Either better or more inclined to play one "role", so to speak, but I think when you let go of the titles of rhythm and lead (and the playing associated with each) you're more free for musical contribution. I'm sure at some point the "rhythm" player will have a better idea for a melodic line or solo, and the "lead" player will have a better riff, rhythmic variation of something, and so forth. Defining the two players as specific parts tends to lead to tunnel vision in musical approach, as well as pointless arguments and drama - I'd rather let the two players be guitarists and foster a more cooperative mindset. It basically opens the approach of "you're both guitarists, you're working to create the same music, work together and take each other's best ideas regardless of ego and make it into something."
#13
Quote by :-D
Either better or more inclined to play one "role", so to speak, but I think when you let go of the titles of rhythm and lead (and the playing associated with each) you're more free for musical contribution. I'm sure at some point the "rhythm" player will have a better idea for a melodic line or solo, and the "lead" player will have a better riff, rhythmic variation of something, and so forth. Defining the two players as specific parts tends to lead to tunnel vision in musical approach, as well as pointless arguments and drama - I'd rather let the two players be guitarists and foster a more cooperative mindset. It basically opens the approach of "you're both guitarists, you're working to create the same music, work together and take each other's best ideas regardless of ego and make it into something."


That's the hard part is finding a guitarist that doesn't have a big enough ego to step away from super technical shred to play some Rush That's mainly why I can't work with some guitarist. They just won't do something "below" their skill for a few minutes. They gotta be constantly wanking 24/7, day in and day out.

If a guitarist or any other musician doesn't have an ego, cherish him/her. They are the best and easiest to work with and get along with.

Besides me being off topic. :-D makes a good point. Just do what is needed to play what you and the band want to achieve. Music is about fun, creativity, and team work. Be a team player and take one for the team.
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#14
Quote by Xter
That's the hard part is finding a guitarist that doesn't have a big enough ego to step away from super technical shred to play some Rush That's mainly why I can't work with some guitarist. They just won't do something "below" their skill for a few minutes. They gotta be constantly wanking 24/7, day in and day out.

Some of my fondest college memories are of playing in the pit for Footloose and playing "Rock You Like a Hurricane" with my friend as the pit rose up during intermission.