#1
Title says it all. Which one is better, overall. Styles---- Clean - Metalcore
Yamaha Pacifica 012
Peavey Vypyr 15

Quote by jukejointjohnny
Pro Tip - Neck pickup, tone dial rolled all the way off, makes tuners respond WAY more accurately. I only learned this trick fairly recently, and it actually works.
#2
Depends on your tastes.

Personally I like heavy mahogany Les Pauls and mahogany strats/super strats. They just sound "warmer" or "thicker" to me.
Gibson Les Paul Custom (Aged White)
Custom Kramer Baretta
Custom Fender Strat
Epiphone Black Beauty
Epiphone AJ
Marshall JCM900 4201
Blackheart Little Giant
MXR Dist. +
MXR Six Band EQ
MXR Phase 90
#3
Two different woods. That's like asking someone if chocolate or vanilla is better. Generally, mahogany has more low-mid emphasis, while ash has more high-mid emphasis.
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
Dean Evo
Mesa F-50
Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
Ampeg V2
pedals
#4
Quote by LaidBack
Two different woods. That's like asking someone if chocolate or vanilla is better. Generally, mahogany has more low-mid emphasis, while ash has more high-mid emphasis.


Chocolate. No question about it.
#5
**** you duck.


Vanilla.
Gibson Les Paul Studio
Highway One Telecaster
Dean Evo
Mesa F-50
Laney GH50L
Vox AC30 C2
Ampeg V2
pedals
#6
Completely different woods.

Mahogany is moderately heavy and tends to be strongest in the mids and bass; it can seem to miss some treble detail, so overall it has quite a warm and thick tone.

'Northern' ash is considerably heavy and has tight bass and lots of treble detail but comparatively weak mids.

Most ash used in guitars isn't northern ash though. Northern ash is almost as heavy as maple, so 'lite' or 'swamp' ash is more commonly used instead. It has a very slightly more balanced tone than the heavier northern ash; you can expect it to not sound quite so 'scooped' as its harder, denser cousin.

Both woods tend to be used for the same sort of music, catering to different tastes. For example, mahogany is good for hard rock because its thick tone brings a lot of power to your sound; ash is also popular in hard rock because the tight and precise nature of its tone can help keep distortion sounding clear.

Not to mention that the construction of the guitar greatly effects how much the body wood will matter. In a neck-through guitar the body wood barely matters at all. In a set neck guitar the body wood seems to be the most important elemnt of the guitar. In a bolt-on instrument the neck wood is slightly more important, but it's not quite as unbalanced as with a neck-through guitar. Then there's the fretboard, the bridge type and material, electronics, whether the guitar is chambered or solid or semi-hollow or hollow, the scale length, fret material, nut material....
Yes, I know everything. No, I can't play worth a damn.
A child is trafficked and sold for sex slavery every 30 seconds. Support Love146.