#2
If that suits the song, sure? There are plenty of songs that have quiet, subtle choruses and at least one loud verse (Fake Plastic Trees by Radiohead, and The Unforgiven by Metallica both come to mind. Man, I never thought I'd mention those two together).

Basically it comes down to being heard and suiting the surroundings. There are times you can be screaming your lungs out over a quiet break in an intense song...

Also, hitting the right notes is exceptionally important in the subtle stuff, but when it's balls-to-the-wall it's as much about the feeling as the actual note, unless there's a harmony, in which case it becomes very important to note throw your harmonizer (or yourself) under the bus.
Last edited by RadioMuse at Feb 29, 2012,
#3
Quote by RadioMuse
If that suits the song, sure? There are plenty of songs that have quiet, subtle choruses and at least one loud verse (Fake Plastic Trees by Radiohead, and The Unforgiven by Metallica both come to mind. Man, I never thought I'd mention those two together).

Basically it comes down to being heard and suiting the surroundings. There are times you can be screaming your lungs out over a quiet break in an intense song...

Also, hitting the right notes is exceptionally important in the subtle stuff, but when it's balls-to-the-wall it's as much about the feeling as the actual note, unless there's a harmony, in which case it becomes very important to note throw your harmonizer (or yourself) under the bus.


The song I was referring to is man on the moon.

Ya I get what ur saying. Like taking back sundy for the last paragraph.

Just need basics of how to sing


More tips would be good.
My newest cover Rivers Of Babylon sublime style.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=J_E7iWLxmiA


My gear:
taylor 310
Fender strat MiM
Cry Baby-GCB-95
Tone port ux2
tascam dp4
80s rock, classic rock, classic metal
Last edited by silly6-string at Feb 29, 2012,
#4
Ah.

Starting out it's usually best to support every note with your diaphragm some. Not like all-in but start out giving it too much rather than not enough and work on dialing it back once you know what it feels like to sing the correct note in each spot. I don't know if it's true for everyone but it's much easier for me to hit "the right note" when putting a lot into it than it is to do it softly. Or at least, it was for a long time, and hitting the right notes is probably the most important thing.

For Man On The Moon you've got the right idea. The "yeah yeah yeah yeah" in the verse should be supported just enough to not go flat, which is tricky. Error on the side of singing it too loudly. Once you get to "Andy did you hear..." you have to support it with some conviction.

Oh, and find some way to record yourself a bit. Any ol' computer microphone (laptop, gaming mic, or whatever) will do with audacity. It's amazing how much I started to improve after I started recording myself a lot. And once you know what notes you can hit and how you have to approach them, it becomes much easier. It was a painful revelation how f*@#ing awful I was, but if I'd never known I wouldn't be where I am now.