#1
Sorry for the question but I don't know which one Is better suited for me. Is a 50w jcm big enough to play in a bar or small gig? The tsl is a 100w which looks like it has alot of options and can be more versitle. I play classic rock , some country, and modern rock. I don't have alot of experience with marshall amps, Do the jcm 800 have a effects loop? if not im sure you can still use a pedal board. Just need some options to help me go the right way..I do like to play alot of G&R.
#2
JCM800 is a legend... And yes it is powerful enough, but still I'd go for a microphone.
#4
IIRC the JCM 800 2205-2206 have the FX loop. I've heard the 2203-2204 sound better but I don't have experience with that. The JCM 800 will sound a lot better than the TSL for sure and it can take pedals in front. You will use your guitar volume pot as a gain control though since it only has one channel. Sweet, isn't it? I do that all the time with my amps and improves my expression. The 50w is big enough for your needs, it's loud as hell (you need to crank it up to get it's best sound anyway). I say the JCM 800 with pedals will be your happiness. The 100w is not necessarily too much loud in comparison with the 50w, I recommend you to get the 100w version since you will get more headroom. I really hope this helps.

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#5
The size of the gig is irrelevant. The question should be, "will it keep up with a drummer?" The answer is, "yes, easily."
Which JCM800? There are several models.
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#6
A 50 watt JCM 800 is practically enough to peel paint off the walls...
Quote by MightyAl
I took a pic of myself, cut a hole in the face and stuck my knob through so i could see what I'd look like if I got bitten by a radioactive elephant.
#7
For cleans I love 800's but hate the muddier loose overdrive they have. I wouldnt go near a TSL, they have far too much going on in them and it shows, they kinda sound unnatural if that makes any sense.

I have a DSL and its sound is incredibly better in every way. Go down to your local retailer and plug them in trough the same cab and you'll understand what I'm ranting about.
#8
Really? Do you prefer JCM800's cleans over the overdrive? I usually hear the opposite xD. The JCM is legendary because of it's overdrive. Well, here is an example of how everybody has it's own taste.

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PRS Swamp Ash Limited Custom 24
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Last edited by Perverockstar69 at Mar 1, 2012,
#9
I love my TSL. I play a mix of everything, but mostly Alternative/Hard Rock.

The JCM800 is awesome.
My Gear
Guitars:
-Gibson Les Paul Studio
-Ibanez "lawsuit" Les Paul
-Ibanez S470
-PRS SE Custom

Amp:
Marshall TSL100
Marshall 1960a cab

Effects:
Dunlop 535q wah
Visual Sound Liquid Chorus

Pickups:
Guitarforce
MHD
#10
The vertical input JCM800 2203 and 2204 are perhaps the best amp ever made. Certainly the best master volume single channel Marshall.
Then came the horizontal 2203/2204. These are the same as the verticals on paper but they were the victim of cost cutting. The most obvious thing being a switch from turret board to PCB. Not a bad thing in itself unless you are working on the insides but it did mean board mounted pots and jack. That isn't as reliable long term as chassis mount and again a pita when it comes time to change them. I also seem to remember that they used lesser transformers but I'm not sure on that.
Then because everybody wanted a two channel amp the released the 2205/2210 but they didn't just add a channel they introduced SS clipping. Horrible stuff. A 2205/2210 will never gain the collector status of a 2203/2204.
Then came the 900 abortion which was really a hybrid (15 opamps and 9 diodes). That was quite scandalous at the time. The SL/X was a stop gap measure until the JCM2000 was released.
With the JCM2000 they returned to basics and made the DSL the way that the 2205/2210 should have been made in the first place. They certainly aren't built as well a vertical or even a horizontal 2203.
The TSL was a side project to compete with Mesa. It didn't succeed. But if you are playing Nu Metal they are a fine choice for those that can't afford a Recto. They don't sound like a recto but they still suit the style ok.

So my take on it, all this considered for the TS.

The 2203 is the best sounding amp for your rock but being a single channel amp you have to do tricks to clean it up. Not exactly difficult but they are techniques you will have to master.
For the country stuff you could get away with it as long as you wind down the gain and/or guitar volume.
The next best option with Marshall would be a DSL and in many ways is actually more what you need. You can coax a quite passable 800 tone out of a DSL plus you have the advantage of a clean channel. If a DSL was good enough for Gary Moore live it's good enough for you.
A TSL is all wrong, don't even consider it. OK if you want to play Korn but otherwise, forget it.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Mar 1, 2012,
#11
Quote by hyper5
For cleans I love 800's but hate the muddier loose overdrive they have. I wouldnt go near a TSL, they have far too much going on in them and it shows, they kinda sound unnatural if that makes any sense.

I have a DSL and its sound is incredibly better in every way. Go down to your local retailer and plug them in trough the same cab and you'll understand what I'm ranting about.

Muddy, loose overdrive?
They're tighter than a nun's twat with a boost...
They've been used for thrash, which calls for insanely tight tone.
#12
Quote by darkwolf291
Muddy, loose overdrive?
They're tighter than a nun's twat with a boost...
They've been used for thrash, which calls for insanely tight tone.


I think a lot of people have different perceptions of what is tight

Thrash is not tight at all compared to most modern metal - metalcore (ATR), modern groove metal (LoG) & modern death metal (Gojira).
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

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#14
JCM 800 hands down
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