#1
I came upon the two terms; 'Extinct' and 'Extant'. Obviously they're related to each other, but I've tried thinking of other words which may be related to each other with the same beginning but different ending (in this case, 'inct' and 'ant') but I really can't relate them.

Like distinct and distant. Or instinct and instant.


Basically, what does the 'inct' and 'ant' stand for at the end of the words?
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
#2
Oh u so funny
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#3
I'm not sure, probably something Latin or French. That's where most of English comes from init?

,--.-'-,--.
\ /-~-\ /
/ )' a a `( \
( ( ,---. ) )
THIS WAS MEANT TO BE A PIG
\ `(_o_o_)' /
\ `-' /
| |---| |
[_] [_]
#4
It depends on the word, they aren't fixed-meaning suffixes.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#5
Ant

EDIT: Oops, I thought you were looking for words that end in -inct and -ant <.<
<- The Usertitle says the truth
Last edited by Boreeas at Feb 29, 2012,
#7
Quote by Todd Hart
It depends on the word, they aren't fixed-meaning suffixes.

Ye, I was thinking that.

I was just wondering if they might be counterparts to each other. Like with words like 'benevolent' and 'molevolent'.

I just like finding out how certains words are made
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat
#8
succinct and succant?!
ಠ_ಠ
<|>
/ω\



Tell me what nation on this earth, was not born of tragedy-Primordial
#9
inct and ant. Ants are not related to inct.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#10
Well instant, extant and distant refer to the state of something but this could be a coincidence of three chosen examples. As for your other three examples I see no relation. I you wish to pursue this further consult an eytmologist. One thing I have noticed, however, is that all of your examples are '-tant' and '-tinct'. This could have some relevance but, again, this could be a coincidence.
When altitude dropping, my ears started popping. One more red nightmare...
#11
Quote by rednightmare
Well instant, extant and distant refer to the state of something but this could be a coincidence of three chosen examples. As for your other three examples I see no relation. I you wish to pursue this further consult an eytmologist. One thing I have noticed, however, is that all of your examples are '-tant' and '-tinct'. This could have some relevance but, again, this could be a coincidence.

Ye, I was thinking it might be 'tant' and 'tinct' instead.
Btw, is your name a King Crimson reference?
Breakfast, Breakfast, it's great for us
We eat, we eat, we eat
That frozen meat
Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, it can't be beat