#1
Hi, I'm new here and I have a question.

I've decided to pick up the guitar, and I did so about 2 weeks ago.

Everything is going smooth, I'm learning some really basic songs from tabs (slowly teaching myself notes), been practicing a lot and my left fingers are finally starting to hurt less.

I do have one question though, I managed to scavenge 2 guitars from family members who aren't playing anymore, and I can't decide which one to use, one is a nylon Spanish guitar and the other is a steel stringed one.

Does it really make a difference which one I play? Is practicing one transferable to the other?

I'm finding I'm really liking finger picking and find songs by guitarists such as Andy Mckee fascinating. Does that mean I should practice on my classical due to its wider nut or should I practice on my steel stringed one?

This is probably a silly question but I was just curious.

Thanks for your time.
#2
Playing steel string guitar is pretty rough on the fingers and if you want to practice a lot it might be too much for your fingers, since you not have that played long.

I find it to be very different to play the two of them, but that's because I generally use a thumbpick which not works well the spanish/classical guitars saddle that's a bit furhter away from the soundhole. And when playing classical, I find it to be very hard to get proper technique on a steel stringed one.

Andy plays steel stringed guitar. But when starting off playing, like you, I think it's more important to actually practice and get chord shapes, single lines etc into your muscle memory. The sound of the different guitars is something you can care about later when your playing is getting more proficient. I think the most important things right now are keeping an interest in the guitar as well as practicing and playing. I think the spanish guitar will work best for that since the nylon strings not are as rough on the hands which makes you be able to practice more, as well as that the neck will make it easier to fret open chords and bar chords.
#3
If you want to be an accomplished finger-picking steel-string player (*like McKee), practice on steel strings. That's my opinion.

Fingernails on nylon sounds very different than fingernails on steel.
#4
I'd suggest you use the steel-string guitar.

For playing chords, a steel-string acoustic will be much easier than a classical guitar. The neck is a little narrower, and the fingerboard is convex. While you can play finger-style on both guitars.
#5
Hmmm, so the general consensus is that it's more important to practice on steel strings rather than getting used to the wider nut? I do fully intend on buying a fingerstyle-steel-stringed guitar in the future.
#6
*deleted*


Sorry. Wrong thread.

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Last edited by Jiggzy.UK at Mar 2, 2012,