#1
I'm looking at sharps and flats and I'm confused on how to approach this.
Last edited by wbt1988 at Mar 1, 2012,
#3
I changed my question a little if that helps. I'm basically confused on how to visualize interchanging scales.
#5
Sorry for the confusion I was looking at Dmaj scale instead of Db major scale which contains a sharp. I was confused because I was in Fmin descending to Db maj and I couldn't figure out where the F# was coming from.
#7
I get it now on the circle of fifths if your at F#/Gb and your going clockwise you would be still flattening but you would be looking at it as F# minus a sharp as you descend and then counter clockwise is Gb sharpening minus a flat as you ascend.
Last edited by wbt1988 at Mar 1, 2012,
#8
Now that I can image the scale sharpending or flattening. The hard part is changing from min to major or major to minor.
#9
Are you looking for the parallel minor (same letter name, different key) or relative minor (different letter name, same key)?

Or are you trying to learn once you're in a key which chords are major/minor?
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#10
Quote by King Of Suede
Are you looking for the parallel minor (same letter name, different key) or relative minor (different letter name, same key)?

Or are you trying to learn once you're in a key which chords are major/minor?


When you say once in key are you talking about the Major or Minor scale used to build from? If so I know the Major and minor chords in a minor and major scale, but not sure that I'm understanding the idea of being in key.
Last edited by wbt1988 at Mar 2, 2012,
#11
I think you would really benefit from getting a basic workbook on music theory and going through it.

This is the problem we're going to have here - every question implies more questions, and we have to make assumptions about what you know, and you're coming back with really basic questions.

I recommend "Harmony and Theory" by Shroeder and Wyatt, but I'm sure there are other good books. Worth the effort.