#1
Hi all, I have a Jackson Dinky that has a bolt on neck, and im going to be on a long distance flight.

Now i could check the guitar in, but given its value im not prepared to do that incase it "dissapears" somewhere along the line.

The other option is of course taking it on as hand luggage, i have looked into this and the airline im flying with allow the guitar on within a certain size, and mine is going to be too big.

One other option i have is taking the neck off (something ive never done) and put both in a suitcase (securly passed of course), but when i get to my destination then i can put it into a shop and get it put back on proffesionaly as i wouldnt take any chances doing it myself and dont want to screw it up.

Is this a good idea at all or can this damage the guitar in anyway?

Thrasher!!
#2
i am assuming it is a bolt on? if so, unless you don't know how to use a screwdriver, a professional is unnecessary. just take the strings off, unscrew the neck, fly, screw back on (remember to BRING the screwdriver), put new strings on. the neck will be fine off for a while.
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#3
That is okay. There is no problem taking the neck off. Nothing you couldn't do yourself.

Just make sure when you put the neck back on that the neck is in the pocket straight and level, and when you screw it back in, screw it in in a diagonal fashion, like bottom right, top left, bottom left, top right, so id doesn't twist.
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#4
Aye its a bolt on with a Floyd Rose.

Thats perfect, i just wasnt sure if it would give me any problems when I put the neck back on like maybe being out a little as i have no idea!!

Using a screwdriver isnt an issue either ;-)

Cheers chaps!!
#5
Just be sure to be careful with the screwdriver so you don't marr/strip the heads or slip and gouge the wood.

And don't over-torque.

All those issues can happen with a "professional" too. Might be more likely with them because time is money and they can't possibly care as much about your guitar as you do.
#6
Cheers for the head up, i take good care of my guitar and ill be in absolute no rush to put it on and be careless, ill have a good idea how tight the bolts are when i take the neck of so that will be a guide when i put it back on.

What i might do is get the neck on, and just put it into a shop and get the Floyd Rose set up, i havent had the guitar too long maybe 6 months or so and they advised me at least once a year i should get it reset, amd ive started having silly problems with crackling from the lead in the jack on the guitar :-(
Last edited by thrasher_1972 at Mar 2, 2012,
#7
Buy a flaregun at Walmart and throw it in your guitar case. Seriously.

The TSA treats flareguns like a legitimate firearm and require you check in any luggage containing such things. Once you inform them that its in the guitar case a guard will personally escort your case to the handlers and they'll tag it. When you arrive at your destination they'll bring it straight to you and you'll be on your merry way. The last thing they wanna do is loose a firearm aboard a plane, and will make damn sure that case gets to you on the other side.

Trick I learned from one of my Dad's friends that flies around with expensive camera gear. He lost a $900 lense one time from lost luggage, and hasn't lost anything since he started carrying a flaregun in his gear.
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#8
Great Idea, but as far as I know in the UK (my destination) i would need a fire arms licence and that i dont have, it isnt as common in the UK as in America.

Good thinking though :-)

Cheers
#9
Not such a great idea.

I know multiple people who've had firearms stolen from their luggage in the airport within the last 5 years.

Plus, in the UK, the criminals:guns ratio is much higher than in the States, so it's even more likely for it to get stolen over there. That's one of the unintended consequences of gun control.
#10
Quote by Flux'D
Buy a flaregun at Walmart and throw it in your guitar case. Seriously.

The TSA treats flareguns like a legitimate firearm and require you check in any luggage containing such things. Once you inform them that its in the guitar case a guard will personally escort your case to the handlers and they'll tag it. When you arrive at your destination they'll bring it straight to you and you'll be on your merry way. The last thing they wanna do is loose a firearm aboard a plane, and will make damn sure that case gets to you on the other side.

Trick I learned from one of my Dad's friends that flies around with expensive camera gear. He lost a $900 lense one time from lost luggage, and hasn't lost anything since he started carrying a flaregun in his gear.

It doesn't work like that in the UK. Firearms on planes are completely banned.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#11
One thing came to mind, because the luggage will be checked with the guitar in it, im assuming the temperature where the bagage is kept could be pretty cold could that be an issue?
#12
I took the neck off on my that once then i put it back on and it wasn't screw down all the way and my action was insanely high so i lowered it and set it up realized the neck wasn't on so i fixed it and all strings were on the Damn fretboard but fixed it and all is well
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#13
Separating the neck and body may work, but you'll have to take into account several things:
  • You can't take the screwdriver with you. No airline flying through the UK will allow a passenger to take a screwdriver on the plane with them. If you stick it in with the rest of your luggage to go in the hold then you may be asked about it but they'll probably allow it; but don't try taking it on as part of your hand luggage.
  • Remember to put the neck back on and restring the guitar as soon as possible. If it has a vibrato bridge, remember to block it before taking the neck off. If the headstock is angled back from the neck, make sure it's padded properly on all sides so there's no pressure on the weak join between the headstock and the neck shaft.
  • Even if the disassembled guitar fits within the dimensions of hand luggage, check to make sure you're not going over the weight limit. You need to be able to lift whatever hand luggage you take on with one hand, over your head, easily. If you would need assistence getting it in to overhead storage then it's too heavy and they won't allow it; most airlines specify a particular weight limit, so check with whichever airline you're flying with what that limit is. Remember that it's not just the guitar's weight, but also the bulk of whatever case you have it in, padding, etc.
  • Bear in mind that almost all airlines only allow you to take one piece of hand luggage on. If there's a problem you may find yourself left with none of your belongings other than your (disassembled) guitar, and that's no fun when you're stuck in another country. However you pack your guitar up, do try to make sure you can still get a spare change of clothes, a wallet, phone, etc, in there too.


Most airlines have gotten better in regards to the handling of instruments. The baggage guys will still chuck everything around but if the guitar is in a secure, properly-fitting hard case (bundle in a sheet or towel to take up empty space so the guitar has no chance of moving around in there), it should make it through the flight okay. If it gets lost, well, then there's also a good chance that all your other things have been lost too and in the grand scheme of things the whereabouts of your clothes and money should take priority over a guitar.
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#14
^^Punctuation is your friend iihaa

I wasn't sure on UK firearm laws, apologies on that. It works pretty well going around the US and nothing has ever been stolen from my Dad's friend that does it near weekly
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2003 Gibson Flying V w/ Moon Inlay
2006 Fender All-American Partscaster
SVK ELP-C500 Custom

1964 Fender Vibro Champ
1989 Peavey VTM60

[thread="1166208"]Gibsons Historic Designs[/thread]
Last edited by Flux'D at Mar 3, 2012,
#15
MrFlibble some good points, but, the guitar would actually be checked in secure suitcases and are very well padded with clothes and bubblewrap!!