#1
22 chord x 6 fingerings for each chord = 132 chord diagrams and jesus christ that is a shit load to learn.

I know some of you saw the title of this topic in the forum and though "So What"?

Well my problem is that I need to make chord diagrams for each chord/fingering so I can make a few A0 sized posters with them all on it and hang them up in my room so I can learn a new one each day, but I have no idea where I can make chord diagrams online so I can copy and paste them into MS publisher/powerpoint to make the posters so I am wondering if anybody on here knows a place?

I am also planning to do the same thing with each scale and position on the fretboard. Also once I have made these posters I will upload it somewhere so that if any of you guys want to download it and print it of it will be there for you.
#2
you know it would be a hell of a lot easier to just learn how to build chords and learn the notes on the fretboard, right?
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#3
Yeah, you're better off learning the notes on the fingerboard and almost more importantly CHORD SHAPES. A "D" shape, for example, can be used all over the neck.
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#5
Quote by michaelbot9000
^^ this.. it sounds like you're trying to learn algebra by memorizing every answer to every problem rather than learning how to do the math


This x1000...learning the CAGED system will also make life a lot easier
#6
Quote by mrkeka
you know it would be a hell of a lot easier to just learn how to build chords and learn the notes on the fretboard, right?

Its the only way to fly
#7
Well I know how to construct any major/minor chords and can play those over the fretboard but things like suspended chords, 6th/9th and diminished chords and all of the weird ones in-between, if I know the chord positions of these then I can apply them to any root note I want.

Or does this still seem like a hard way to do things?
#9
You just add the extra notes in the chords you already have. Except diminished, I guess you could learn those, but heaven knows when you 'd use them.

I prefer to just put my fingers in random places until it sounds good. But I guess I could look up my diminished and augmented chords again...
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#10
Quote by Danjo's Guitar
You just add the extra notes in the chords you already have. Except diminished, I guess you could learn those, but heaven knows when you 'd use them.

I prefer to just put my fingers in random places until it sounds good. But I guess I could look up my diminished and augmented chords again...


....Don't hate on diminished chords.

There are shapes for every chord quality and extension you can think of. It's good to learn your basic triads (CAGED system is a good start but also simple triads across the neck), 7ths (all kinds of barres, especially without the 5th) and 9ths (Hendrix and SRV are all about 9ths, that's a good place to look). Those are all fairly standard in literature and have easily transposable shapes. 11ths and 13ths and further extensions are something you would likely have to think about anyway to decide the exact composition of them, ergo knowing the fretboard.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at Mar 3, 2012,
#11
Terrible idea, please spare yourself the trouble.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#13
Quote by Xiaoxi
Terrible idea, please spare yourself the trouble.

Spare himself of the trouble of basic chord construction and memorizing where notes are on the fretboard?
#14
Quote by z4twenny
Spare himself of the trouble of basic chord construction and memorizing where notes are on the fretboard?

All he's doing is memorizing physical shapes.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#15
Quote by Kerbache
22 chord x 6 fingerings for each chord = 132 chord diagrams and jesus christ that is a shit load to learn.

I know some of you saw the title of this topic in the forum and though "So What"?

Well my problem is that I need to make chord diagrams for each chord/fingering so I can make a few A0 sized posters with them all on it and hang them up in my room so I can learn a new one each day, but I have no idea where I can make chord diagrams online so I can copy and paste them into MS publisher/powerpoint to make the posters so I am wondering if anybody on here knows a place?

I am also planning to do the same thing with each scale and position on the fretboard. Also once I have made these posters I will upload it somewhere so that if any of you guys want to download it and print it of it will be there for you.

Do you know the difference between closed and open voicing's?
#16
You will naturally learn the shapes by knowing the notes on the fretboard and constructing them yourself.

Also if you'd forget a shape, you can "create" a new one within a few seconds.

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#17
Learning "grips" might help with hand strength and get you exposed to more music ... but I agree with most of the posters here -- it's not the best use of time and energy.

Joe Pass had a way of organizing chords into families: Major, Minor, Dominant, Altered. Keep in mind he would substitute chords all the time and reharmonize on the fly, so he was a master.

I think it's more helpful to learn what "Major" is and how to extend it (6, Maj7, Maj9, 6/9) .. (similarly with the other families) learn the notes while you are at it ... much easier to see the whole thing when you learn things like "Amin7 has 3 notes in common with CMaj" or "A6 is just an inversion of F#min7". "If you raise the root of a dominant chord you get a diminished chord"

Etc etc etc
#18
If you know a chord shape then you already know how to play it in any of 22 positions.

If you know that flattening the 3rd of a major chord will give you a minor chord then you already know how to play the minor equivalent of any major chord you know.

If you know that adding the minor 7th interval to a major chord will will give you a (dominant) 7th chord then you already know how to play the dom 7th equivalent of any major chord you know.

etc, etc
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#19
Quote by Kerbache
22 chord x 6 fingerings for each chord = 132 chord diagrams and jesus christ that is a shit load to learn.

Yes, and if you're also planning on doing this with every scale known to man, you're going to be memorizing needlessly for around the next 87 lifetimes. The fact that you're referring to these as "chord diagrams" suggests that you don't understand the theory behind chord construction; learning it would be immensely more beneficial than just memorizing stuff for the sake of memorizing it. Chords are a series of intervals, not diagrams or fingerings. The fingerings are merely a physical translation of those chords onto your instrument.

The people who are telling you to learn the basics of chord construction and solidly know the notes of your fretboard are right on the mark here. By doing so, you're taking all the information you would get from memorizing everything, but rather than overloading your brain with concepts you don't understand, you're making that knowledge readily available whenever you need it without cluttering everything together. Did I study every position of every major scale? No. Could I pull out any given one from any position on the neck? Yes.

By approaching it this way, you'll have access to the same amount of information whenever you need it, and it'll be clear and concise. A lot of people approach chords and scales the way you're describing, but it's an incredibly arduous process that will give you none of the practical benefit that you'll actually need to make music.
#20
Well I was very adamant about learning the chords my way but after looking at the advice here I clearly would be better off doing it the proper way. I think I need to properly learn the fretboard then before I attempt this kind of project? I mean I know the fretboard a little bit but sometimes it takes me like 2-4 seconds to identify where a sharp or flat note is and if I am playing in a key with loads of sharps or flats like Gm or B major I tend to usually stick to the pentatonic/major/minor/arpeggio shapes that I have glued in my head.

What suggestions would you guys give to help learn the fretboard better?
#21
Quote by Kerbache
I think I need to properly learn the fretboard then before I attempt this kind of project? I mean I know the fretboard a little bit but sometimes it takes me like 2-4 seconds to identify where a sharp or flat note is and if I am playing in a key with loads of sharps or flats like Gm or B major I tend to usually stick to the pentatonic/major/minor/arpeggio shapes that I have glued in my head.

G minor only has 2 flats, so that shouldn't be too nuts for you to learn - did you mean G#m, maybe?

Anyway, since guitarists tend to think vertically a lot of the time (in patterns for scales and chords going across strings), I think the best approach to learn notes is horizontally, one string at a time. Practice learning the notes of individual strings and everything will fall into place better - besides, once you've learned the notes on your high E, you know 1/3 of the notes across your strings. You can do whatever you want - play solos on one string, drill yourself on specific note names, and so forth.

If you're looking to get better at chord construction, you can apply chords to your one string to see how certain notes change the sound or quality of a chord. For example, if you started on the high E string with an E augmented arpeggio (0-4-8), E major arpeggio (0-4-7), then go to E minor (0-3-7), then E diminished (0-3-6), Em7b5 (0-3-6-10) Edim7 (0-3-6-9) and so forth, you'll be able to see and hear how you can change notes to construct different chords. Then, as you learn what the notes are, both concepts will begin locking into place together.
#22
Quote by Kerbache
22 chord x 6 fingerings for each chord = 132 chord diagrams and jesus christ that is a shit load to learn.

I know some of you saw the title of this topic in the forum and though "So What"?

Well my problem is that I need to make chord diagrams for each chord/fingering so I can make a few A0 sized posters with them all on it and hang them up in my room so I can learn a new one each day, but I have no idea where I can make chord diagrams online so I can copy and paste them into MS publisher/powerpoint to make the posters so I am wondering if anybody on here knows a place?

I am also planning to do the same thing with each scale and position on the fretboard. Also once I have made these posters I will upload it somewhere so that if any of you guys want to download it and print it of it will be there for you.


I would recommend learning less chords at a time.

try learning the chords for 1 particular key.

then learn and practice common chord progressions in key.

Then learn to change keys and play the common progressions in various keys.

then learn to add 7ths, and upper extentions to those chords. (and chord progressions)

* work on both Major and minor


Plus .... Play lots of songs, LISTEN, pay attention to what's going on and have fun.


You don't want to randomly learn a bunch of anything. Whether it's chord shapes, scale patterns, or just the fancy words, you want to be able to connect it to music.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 3, 2012,
#23
Quote by Xiaoxi
All he's doing is memorizing physical shapes.

Sooooooo... you do realize theres a middle ground between noob and "pro" right?

+1 to gm
Last edited by z4twenny at Mar 3, 2012,
#24
Just start learning chords dudz. if your key signature or key chords is G then the you can use the Scaling of D and C.