#1
Im looking for a fairly cheap but usable recording desk. as for budget start as low as you can and work up. heres the requirements.

-holds 2 computer monitors
-1-2 pairs of speaker monitors
-midi keyboard tray
-4 rack spaces
-storage on both sides (shelves preferably)

thanks all, if i cant find one fairly cheap I may attept at building one (would anyone recomend this?) thanks
#2
Please define your budget with a monetary value. We have no idea what "low" and "fairly cheap" means to you.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#3
I can see your point but at this point I dont exactly know what ill be able to spend.
most likely $400 or less
#4
Do you have an Ikea near you?

The easiest way to go is to go down to your Ikea, get the longest Galant desk they have (I think it's 63"?) and then buy a sheet of birch at Home Depot for $45 (you'll probably only use half of it if you build a 3x2 rack unit, mine is a 3x3) and build a rack to put on top of it, which will also act as a stand for your computer monitors and studio monitors. This is mine:



Cost me ~$350 total, if I remember correctly; but I also got the roll out drawer unit, keyboard stow-away, cable hider and computer tower holder. If you don't need those, you'd save about $100-150 right there. If you can get away with a smaller desk, they have one that's 40-some inches, I believe. It's significantly cheaper , but it's not as deep either, so you'll lose a lot of desk space. Whether that's important or not is up to you.

TBH, unless you want something super basic, $400 isn't going to cut it if you want to build your own desk.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#5
thanks, i saw a video on youtube where a guy built a nice one for $100 guess its not so true haha
#6
Well, it depends on what you build it with. You can buy cast-off material at Ikea for ridiculously cheap in their "as-is" section. They take all the broken stuff, disassemble it, and sell it off as parts. But then, just like working with wood, you have to measure, cut, drill, etc. everything yourself, and you might have some other holes, etc. to deal with. That may or may not be okay with you.

I built a perfectly good shelf and trolley for next to nothing.

Now, to take this in another direction....

I had a 63" computer desk from Ikea that had most of what you were looking for. I had my two computer monitors on it, my mixing monitors (and a pair of stereo speakers), etc.

The problem with putting your mixing monitors on the desk, though, is that the desk resonates, which affects how you hear your music. You will need to decouple your speakers from your desk somehow.

What I did, instead, was trade my big desk with the smaller desk upstairs that was literally half the size. It has a computer keyboard drawer, and fits my two computer monitors just fine. Speakers sit on either side of the desk on stands, and my rack gear sits in the little trolley I made that is on casters and sits beside the desk. It's a much more efficient use of space, provides a more accurate listening experience (which is critical for mixing), and allowed me to use a significantly cheaper desk.

The speaker stands were fairly inexpensive:

two concrete building blocks (those puppies ain't resonating much)
a scrap piece of plywood cut 1' x 1' on the top and bottom of the blocks
some screws drilled through the top and through the bottom of the bottom piece of plywood for the speaker stands to have as little contact with the floor as possible
a piece of fiberglass to decouple the speaker from the top piece of plywood
wrap with cloth bought on sale from a fabric store



CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.