#2
A dominant chord is a chord built from the fifth scale degree of a key, a dominant seventh chord is a chord with intervals of 1 3 5 b7.

I don't really define anything as a dominant scale to be honest, but if somebody refers to something being a dominant scale they're generally referring to any scale with a 3, 5 and b7.
#3
a scale is not dominant. the concept of a scale being dominant is ridiculous. people are probably going to disagree, but i stand by it. i remember when someone was trying to convince me that there was such a thing as a dominant key...

for a chord to be dominant, well, that's another story. typically, a chord that's dominant is the chord that's built on the fifth degree of a scale -- i.e. an E major chord in the key of A. but in jazz harmony, where it doesn't have to be built on the fifth degree, it's basically just a major chord with a minor seventh (and/or any further extensions, such as the 9th, 11th, and 13th) tacked onto it.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#4
Quote by AeolianWolf
a scale is not dominant. the concept of a scale being dominant is ridiculous. people are probably going to disagree, but i stand by it. i remember when someone was trying to convince me that there was such a thing as a dominant key...

I'll defend you on this as well.

have no fear
#5
Quote by :-D
I'll defend you on this as well.

have no fear




probably the first time i've ever used that.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Quote by AeolianWolf
a scale is not dominant. the concept of a scale being dominant is ridiculous. people are probably going to disagree, but i stand by it. i remember when someone was trying to convince me that there was such a thing as a dominant key...


There is...

You're writing a piece in C major, C major is your tonic key. Then you modulate to the key of the dominant chord (G Major) for the middle section. So you are currently in the dominant key.

It's a very common expression in analysis.
#10
Quote by :-D
^I'd imagine he's talking about the quality of the key, for example being in the key of C dominant.


Well that's obviously true...
#11
Quote by 505088K
There is...

You're writing a piece in C major, C major is your tonic key. Then you modulate to the key of the dominant chord (G Major) for the middle section. So you are currently in the dominant key.

It's a very common expression in analysis.


that's true. but i wasn't thinking of a dominant key in that sense, as :-D clarified.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#12
Quote by AeolianWolf
a scale is not dominant. the concept of a scale being dominant is ridiculous. people are probably going to disagree, but i stand by it. i remember when someone was trying to convince me that there was such a thing as a dominant key...

for a chord to be dominant, well, that's another story. typically, a chord that's dominant is the chord that's built on the fifth degree of a scale -- i.e. an E major chord in the key of A. but in jazz harmony, where it doesn't have to be built on the fifth degree, it's basically just a major chord with a minor seventh (and/or any further extensions, such as the 9th, 11th, and 13th) tacked onto it.


the key of mixolydian A DER DER