#1
so okay guys i already know how to do a pentatonic scale but i have a question...

example.. if there's a chord progression of " C G Am Em F C G" do i need to pick only one of the pentatonic scale? what i mean is.. let's say i have the C Major, G Major, A Minor, etc scale.. should i change my scale as the chord change??? or should i only pick one of them....


( is this the right section? or should i put it in the "Guitar Techniques Section")

P.S if your answer is no then..... can you help me? i dont know which note to get or whatever... im just guessing notes i get from the scaleS...
#2
the chords are all in the key of C major, so you can use only C major pentatonic scale to solo over that chords. You can change keys for all chords too, to make it more interesting. Whatever you want if it sounds good
#3
you have several options. C G Am Em F are all in the key of C major and A minor.
So depending on the feel of the song and/or your root you'd want to pick one of those. Most likely in C I'd say, so try C major. This is most common and I think it's the best way to start ^^ If you're writing the solo down, maybe try out the C majo heptationic scale (aka C major scale), as it gives you more variety than pentatonic (although pentatonic is way simpler to play and improvise on). Also very good thing it, as you play the scale over your chord progression, it's very good sounding to land on the root of the chord you're playing over, instead of the root of the scale (like when you finish a lick/bar/part of solo). You can't do this fully w/ pentatonic, as there is no F in it (you can also just skip this part completely). Just try out couple things and you'll see ^^

You can also change the scale each time you change the chord. Variation of this is sometimes used in blues, when you for each chord play notes in the chord + couple of well-sounding extra note (pretty much means you make a scale, kinda like pentatonic, but with bit different intervals, depending on music style, etc.)
#4
Quote by tumaeka123
so okay guys i already know how to do a pentatonic scale but i have a question...

example.. if there's a chord progression of " C G Am Em F C G" do i need to pick only one of the pentatonic scale? what i mean is.. let's say i have the C Major, G Major, A Minor, etc scale.. should i change my scale as the chord change??? or should i only pick one of them....



WHen you're learning to solo, use one scale. Explore. Develop your ear so that you know what things are going to sound like before you play them, and practice over backing tracks that have clear chord changes so you learn how that affects that you're doing.

As you get more experienced, you can do more and more complex things. You can switch scales in a solo. You can solo just with the chord tones. You can solo with the pentatonic scale which corresponds to each chord, etc. There isn't one "right answer" for what a solo should be: there are some truly great solos that are all one scale, or all in one scale with the addition of a passing note (eg George Harrison's Let it Be solo, Page's Stairway solo).

But most people learn by staying one scale and develping their ability to think and play in that scale before adding more complex things.
#5
i thought if the chords will change i will change my scale too.. thanks for that.. by the way can you help me by making solo? just pm me and i will tell you the title...


the solo im making was...
1st im gonna play it like a piano you know what i mean? the note for note not chord... it's like when you are a beginner and dont know how to play a guitar....
2nd go for the solo.......


P.S so somebody replied that as the chord progression go it is more better if i land on the root of that chord???????? do you mean like this:

if my chord is in C i will first go for a C note then solo then if the chord goes in G i will on a G note??
#6
Uh ...

No, I can't help you in writing your solo. You have to learn how to write your own solos.

You write a solo by developing your ear until you can hear musical ideas in your head - then you play those ideas on your guitar.

As for your question about chord roots, it's not easy to understand what you're asking. You should be aware of your chord tones. You should not be a slave to them. Experiment and see what you like the sound of!
#8
heres what i would recommend:
take your progression, and listen to it. Get a feel for it.
Then, take however many bars you are going to solo for, on something like garageband, and loop it.
Take the recorder and some headphones, and play the loop, and SING whatever comes into your head that will sound sweet.
Figure out what you just sang on the guitar. This is how i write a lot of my solos.
#9
Quote by macashmack
heres what i would recommend:
take your progression, and listen to it. Get a feel for it.
Then, take however many bars you are going to solo for, on something like garageband, and loop it.
Take the recorder and some headphones, and play the loop, and SING whatever comes into your head that will sound sweet.
Figure out what you just sang on the guitar. This is how i write a lot of my solos.


That is really cool, I'm going to try that!
#10
Quote by tumaeka123

P.S so somebody replied that as the chord progression go it is more better if i land on the root of that chord???????? do you mean like this:

if my chord is in C i will first go for a C note then solo then if the chord goes in G i will on a G note??


no, pretty much the opposite. When a plane lands, it's the last thing it does during the flight. It can fly elsewhere afterwards, but i certainly doesn't start with landing. It's the same w/ the guitar term. Landing on a note means then your licks or certain solo parts or the whole solo resolve(end) with one note (or chord). It's the note you play as last one in that certain part, often it's root note (because it feels natural in the scale). You can give it completely different feel by landing on a root note of the chord. Also depending on solo, this isn't something you do strictly on each chord change. It's more like during the solo, if it naturally resolves into something (typically long note, w/ some vibrato) you can try throwing there the root note of the chord instead of the root of the scale.

Of course you don't have to though (; as said before, experiment, experiment, experiment. There isn't really any right and wrong in music as long as it sounds good in the context. Also depends on what kind of solo you want. If you plan on having a minute solo made of sweeped arpeggios and tapping, than you won't find any use for this (but i suppose you don't, considering your questions).

Also sorry for wording in my previous post, i wouldn't say it's strictly better. It's different and in some context might and will sound better, but it's definitely not fitting for everything. It's more like an idea of something you can try and see for yourself
#11
You can use the C Major scale, you have a money chords the "C G Am Em F C G" if you can but you can change that chords to broken chords to make a good sounds and blend. You can use C-G/C-Am-Em-/E#-F-Fm/G-C-F/G. It depends on you taste.
#12
Quote by michmar389
You can use C-G/C-Am-Em-/E#-F-Fm/G-C-F/G. It depends on you taste.



i dont get it....

do you mean C then G, C then Am then Em, etc.??
#13
i already started mine i converted the notes from a hymn into a guitar tab..


im trying to make a sad solo.. not that sad.. just listen to this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DuZ2xSCwfsA&feature=fvst


somebody requested this one so im trying to do it... my solo starts with the verse but like what i said im doing it like this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ADleVMveQ6c&feature=fvwrel


the solo starts with the notes of the words that is sung in every verse then i'll do the solo...

i want to make a solo like this one... i'ts in major but it sounds sad.. can you help me?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFHJlpQAJqs&feature=related

the full song is this one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOsp2i3lWj0&feature=related
#14
can i use modes for creating solos?

reference: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/guitar_techniques/modes.html and http://www.myguitarsolo.com/sc_majormodes.htm


the first one says

3rd Degree (E, in C major) = Phrygian
4th Degree (F in C major) = Lydian
5th Degree (G in C major) = Mixolydian
6th Degree (A in C major) = Aeolian
7th Degree (B in C major) = Locrian


does that mean if my chord in example F in C major will i use Lydian?
#16
Quote by ouchies
Dont worry about modes just yet. The solo cant sound sad over that progression because that progression resolves to C Major. In order for the solo to sound sad, you have to solo over a sad sounding progression


This is absolute nonsense!

You absolutely positively can write a sad major song. It happens all the time.
#17
Quote by HotspurJr
This is absolute nonsense!

You absolutely positively can write a sad major song. It happens all the time.



how? the sample i gave you is in major.... anyways can you help me with modes?
#18
As said before, don't worry about modes yet. I know this is gonna sound annoying and elitist, but modes are on a bit different level of music knowledge. You first need to get down the basics right (which can take a long time, it's not something you can learn in 5 minutes).
#20
Quote by HotspurJr
This is absolute nonsense!

You absolutely positively can write a sad major song. It happens all the time.


You're right, I neglected to actually play the progression out in my head. The progression does sound a bit sad although it is a "major" progression. However I still stand by my statement that a solo only sounds as sad as the underlying chord changes
#21
Quote by ouchies
However I still stand by my statement that a solo only sounds as sad as the underlying chord changes


which means you're only taking into account note choice -- you're neglecting dynamics, expressive techniques, rhythm, particular note choice...

basically what you're saying is that it's possible to write a sad major key song, but only with the right backing. by corollary, you're also saying it's not possible to write a melody (or even a fragment of a melody) in a major key that sounds sad. which is simply not true.

you're right about the backing having a large role. but it's more than just the changes. that's too simplistic a view -- you need to also consider things like i've mentioned above, in addition to voicing, orchestration, and so forth.

TS, stop worrying about modes. simply put, you don't have the foundation to understand them. you need to go back to the basics of theory, and learn about functional harmony, rather than thinking of changing scales over chords. it's a far more efficient approach. you can view the bigger picture this way, rather than isolating fragments. and this allows you to construct a better solo with ease. a solo should state something or lead somewhere -- it's easier to do that if you're looking at things broadly and know where you want to go. it's not so easy if you isolate different parts and focus on minutiae. not to say that focusing on details is a bad thing (far from it), but if you're too wrapped up in details, you won't get a sense for how everything ties together.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#22
underlying chord changes



what do you mean?

anyways can you help me on guitar modes..... if you cant then nevermind


ok so the real question here is......... now that i have a scale do i just need to pick a notes on that scale? or is there a pattern... coz i think that's the way....

the chords are all in the key of C major


how did you know? my chord progression is C-G-Am-Em-F-C-G

there's no F in pentatonic C major..... how is that?


and again back to soloing........

do i just need to pick any notes on that scale not minding about the chord progressions? just go for soloing?
#23
No. Stop.

You don't know why your song is in C major and you want to learn about modes? That's like wanting to walk a marathon when you didn't even learn how to walk yet...

As said before: Get your theory right and learn your fretboard. With those basics you only have to let creativity do the hard work. For now my friend, you are going too fast...
#24
Quote by AeolianWolf
which means you're only taking into account note choice -- you're neglecting dynamics, expressive techniques, rhythm, particular note choice...

basically what you're saying is that it's possible to write a sad major key song, but only with the right backing. by corollary, you're also saying it's not possible to write a melody (or even a fragment of a melody) in a major key that sounds sad. which is simply not true.

you're right about the backing having a large role. but it's more than just the changes. that's too simplistic a view -- you need to also consider things like i've mentioned above, in addition to voicing, orchestration, and so forth.

TS, stop worrying about modes. simply put, you don't have the foundation to understand them. you need to go back to the basics of theory, and learn about functional harmony, rather than thinking of changing scales over chords. it's a far more efficient approach. you can view the bigger picture this way, rather than isolating fragments. and this allows you to construct a better solo with ease. a solo should state something or lead somewhere -- it's easier to do that if you're looking at things broadly and know where you want to go. it's not so easy if you isolate different parts and focus on minutiae. not to say that focusing on details is a bad thing (far from it), but if you're too wrapped up in details, you won't get a sense for how everything ties together.


Theres really no point in arguing here. Maybe you can do it, but I definitely can't write a sad solo over a 1-4-5.
#25
Well, actually there was a point to argue about since you stated it's impossible to write sad songs in a major key. Turned out that YOU can't do it. That's not even the same ballpark.
Check out the Dutch national anthem (het Wilhelmus). Sounds like your whole family just got murdered, but it's C major
#26
^ Actually if you read all the points I retract my original post and say that a solo only sounds as sad as its underlying progression. Saying that its impossible to write a sad solo over a major progression was too generalized

edit: posts.. not points lol, my bad
Last edited by ouchies at Mar 8, 2012,
#27
Quote by tumaeka123

ok so the real question here is......... now that i have a scale do i just need to pick a notes on that scale? or is there a pattern... coz i think that's the way....

you just pick whatever you want, what sounds good to you, what you're trying to express with your solo. The scale is just tool to help you find notes that generally sound well to you. EXPERIMENT! This is something that cannot be simply explained. Try it out, see what sounds good to you. Listen to/learn other songs/solos in major keys.

Quote by tumaeka123

how did you know? my chord progression is C-G-Am-Em-F-C-G

You need to know how to construct chords and scales to understand that. For now, you can use a chart ( this one) to see which scales are tied to which chords.

Quote by tumaeka123


there's no F in pentatonic C major..... how is that?

C major scale contains notes: C D E F G A B
major pentatonic generally omits 4th and 7th, which leaves you with C D E G A

Quote by tumaeka123

and again back to soloing........

do i just need to pick any notes on that scale not minding about the chord progressions? just go for soloing?


As said many times before, experiment. For now stick with only C major (pentatonic) scale, don't mind modes and experiment. Try out different tone combinations over different chords. Also as said before, try singing over the chord progression(doesn't need to be actual words, just to give you some idea of fitting melody) and then play what you came up with over the progression.

edit: do not expect it to sound awesome from the beginning. Writing a great solo is something that takes time and experience.
Last edited by KorYi at Mar 10, 2012,
#28
hey pal


If it is a slow paced song and low beats per minute. Then i would reccomend playing each part of the progression with its own individual scale.

But if its fast, i would stick with the key scale, what ever all the notes are in..

good luck!
#29
Quote by IbanezMan989
hey pal


If it is a slow paced song and low beats per minute. Then i would reccomend playing each part of the progression with its own individual scale.

But if its fast, i would stick with the key scale, what ever all the notes are in..

good luck!


Why use a bunch of different scales when the whole thing is simply in C major? If you wanna change anything up, no need to use more than accidentals

Quote by tumaeka123

anyways can you help me on guitar modes..... if you cant then nevermind



Aeolian, you've been here longer than I, and you know a whole lot more than I do... how the hell do you still have the energy/patience to try and help?
Quote by Xiaoxi
The Byzantine scale was useful until the Ottoman scale came around and totally annihilated it.
#30
Quote by mrkeka
Aeolian, you've been here longer than I, and you know a whole lot more than I do... how the hell do you still have the energy/patience to try and help?


pot helps.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#31
Quote by AeolianWolf
pot helps.


Have you tried whiskey ? After a few glasses I love everybody here and you all become my best friends.
#32
Quote by KorYi
you just pick whatever you want, what sounds good to you, what you're trying to express with your solo. The scale is just tool to help you find notes that generally sound well to you. EXPERIMENT! This is something that cannot be simply explained. Try it out, see what sounds good to you. Listen to/learn other songs/solos in major keys.


You need to know how to construct chords and scales to understand that. For now, you can use a chart ([url="this one[/URL"]) to see which scales are tied to which chords.


C major scale contains notes: C D E F G A B
major pentatonic generally omits 4th and 7th, which leaves you with C D E G A


As said many times before, experiment. For now stick with only C major (pentatonic) scale, don't mind modes and experiment. Try out different tone combinations over different chords. Also as said before, try singing over the chord progression(doesn't need to be actual words, just to give you some idea of fitting melody) and then play what you came up with over the progression.

edit: do not expect it to sound awesome from the beginning. Writing a great solo is something that takes time and experience.



thanks for your kind answer.. so now i now that i would just pick my ntoes from a scale... not minding about the modes... and the backing track has a large role for making it sad....

can i use this backing chords to make it sad?

The chords:

C Em F C F C G G7

C Em F C F C G C

that's it..