#1
I was improvising over The Fallen Angel by Iron Maiden, and I played the solo in C#m and the song is in Em. Why the hell does it sound good? I've tried to find a reason but nothing comes to mind
#3
I've tried to find a reason but nothing comes to mind


You should try harder.

Here's a starting place:

Notes of Em:

E F# G A B C D E

Notes of C#m

E F# G# A B C# D E

How many notes are different?

(Let me guess - you don't think of scales as a collection of notes, but rather as shapes on the fretboard, huh?)
#4
I dont know the song, but knowing iron maiden the backing track is probably power chords. A lot of times power chords do not establish a key very well. This means that as a soloing guitarist you have a lot more freedom.

For instance, if you have a backing track of E5, G5 and A5. Depending on the resolution of the chords, there will probably be a key implied-for arguments sake, say Em. However, it may sound fine if you solo in D because E, G and A are all in D. Since no 3rds are involved in the chords, you have that mobility.

Given, all of this is drawn only form my experience and isn't a proper music theory explanation.
Gibson SG Standard
Ibanez S2170FB
Peavey JSX
Marshall 1960A
TEXAS A&M
#5
The first solo is in C#m, that's why.
E:-6
B:-0
G:-5
D:-6
A:-0
E:-3
#6
Quote by HotspurJr
(Let me guess - you don't think of scales as a collection of notes, but rather as shapes on the fretboard, huh?)

#8
Quote by HotspurJr
You should try harder.

Here's a starting place:

Notes of Em:

E F# G A B C D E

Notes of C#m

E F# G# A B C# D E

How many notes are different?

(Let me guess - you don't think of scales as a collection of notes, but rather as shapes on the fretboard, huh?)

This time I wasn't. I was really thinking shape 'cuz It was a good point to start this, since I really don't know the song for long.
#9
Quote by Flibo
The first solo is in C#m, that's why.

yeah, it modulates to C#m, then to G#m then back to Em