#1
Hi,

I've been playing guitar and taking lessons for almost 2.5 years, and it's actually going very well. Recently (during last 2 months or so) I'm thinking of quitting taking lessons because i basically cannot afford it anymore.

The teacher is is mostly jazz oriented, has done conservatory-thing, teaches for over 25 years, and has a lot of experience. All in all, as a customer, i am satisfied in his lessons.
I play classical and jazz, supplemented with pop, rock and some latin. Besides,

- I am occasionally given songs to find out the chords of by ear, and he gives feedback after i figured the song out (he has a professionally trained ear). He also has a sence in knowing what songs are -- chord-wise -- at my level to figure out.
- He also gives me classical sheet music, i practice it at home, and the next few lessons he is checking my improvements/difficulties with it and gives some feedback.
- Most important, he learns me things which i dont see in online tutorials, things like improvisations and how to enhance my improvisation-skills, 'features' of jazz (and occasionally other music types), exercises that enhance particular aspects of my guitar-skill, etc. etc.

Especially the last, i find very useful and valuable and these kind of 'tips/advice' are hard to find in online tutorials.

Now if i quit, how do i learn these things? I do not mean tabs and chords since those are simple to find and are just a matter of practice practice practice, but i mean things like the last point above...

Thnx in advance
Last edited by soulnrock at Mar 4, 2012,
#3
Quote by soulnrock
Hi,

I've been playing guitar and taking lessons for almost 2.5 years, and it's actually going very well. Recently (during last 2 months or so) I'm thinking of quitting taking lessons because i basically cannot afford it anymore.

The teacher is is mostly jazz oriented, has done conservatory-thing, teaches for over 25 years, and has a lot of experience. All in all, as a customer, i am satisfied in his lessons.
I play classical and jazz, supplemented with pop, rock and some latin. Besides,

- I am occasionally given songs to find out the chords of by ear, and he gives feedback after i figured the song out (he has a professionally trained ear). He also has a sence in knowing what songs are -- chord-wise -- at my level to figure out.
- He also gives me classical sheet music, i practice it at home, and the next few lessons he is checking my improvements/difficulties with it and gives some feedback.
- Most important, he learns me things which i dont see in online tutorials, things like improvisations and how to enhance my improvisation-skills, 'features' of jazz (and occasionally other music types), exercises that enhance particular aspects of my guitar-skill, etc. etc.

Especially the last, i find very useful and valuable and these kind of 'tips/advice' are hard to find in online tutorials.

Now if i quit, how do i learn these things? I do not mean tabs and chords since those are simple to find and are just a matter of practice practice practice, but i mean things like the last point above...

Thnx in advance


Talk to your teacher about it. If it's because you can't afford to keep going then he should be understanding about your situation; every adult has been in some tough money spots at some time so it's easy to relate to having to cut out some luxuries.

You teacher should definitely be able to give you the tools you need to keep teaching yourself, after all that's what all teaching is (or should be) geared towards: enabling the student to continue to learn after you have nothing left to teach.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#4
I pretty sure it's a good thing to have a really good player/ musician looking over your shoulder. It forces you to pace your progress to meet his expectations. It also provides structure to your practice.

You didn't say what is the frequency of your lessons. Depending on the current interval, I'd say if possible, keep your teacher. But, meet less often, commensurate with your financial situation, of course.
#5
@captaincranky:
I am also aware of the benefits of having an experienced guitar playar/musician.
The frequency of the lessons is once a week. I pay on average an amount of 97,50 euro's a month.

@marrowoflife:
Thnx for the youtube link. I've seen some other video's of that guy in the past...but i never had time or the interest to learn from the internet in the past, since i had a teacher anyway...maybe i have to dig deeper into the internet-lessons, especially the youtube ones.

Any other tips are more than welcome!
#6
Take what you've learned from your teacher, nurture it and start becoming your own teacher. Some feel this is too much pressure for them that's why teachers exist. There's actually more than enough information out there that would benefit your current learning patterns. Have you for example heard of Mental Play or Hands Separate practice? There's an abundance of stuff to learn and different "small" techniques that brings new understanding and evolves the learning process. Much as the connection between mind and instrument. I don't advocate any specific technique since I've studied guitar for too long to know that what most people advocate isn't "the correct" way to do things. There's a very basic notion out there that which doesn't have much backing up such as "playing slowly with metronome and slowly speed up"(which seems to be the salvation of any technical issue in the guitar community at large). ANYWAY learn to find what's important to you with the music that you wish to experience and find out by experimentation, reading, feeling, and being sceptic to the "simple solutions which promise to work over time".

Much love

-fellow explorer
#8
Best way to learn is to play.

Dimebag Darrell put it best (paraphrase): "People ask me all the time 'do you practice certain scales or go through a certain routine every day?' and I tell them, 'No, man! I just play every day, three hours a day. Playing is practice.'"



Find an improvisational club where you can sit-in with some cats. Sit back and listen and start to sit in more and more. You will learn far more from an actual Jazz club than you'll ever learn from a book or YouTube.

The only thing equivalent to actually playing would be moving to the college level. If you study at that level you will still have actual performance as a part of your education.

So to sum up? GET ON STAGE!
#9
Zaphod is right - talk to him, ask him for advice on how to keep learning (you are still paying for his advice so make it worthwhile) and if he could give you extra material to look at for the final few weeks.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#11
Quote by ouchies
Start a band and perform as much as you can. You'll learn a lot and meet a lot of great people

Amen!

Also consider teaching others. I personally don't like Dave Matthews Band (HATE that crap, actually), but someone paid me $20/hour to teach it to them...

You know what? Learning some DMB was GOOD for me as a musician, as was figuring out some Slipknot (HATE that shit!!!!) and constantly going over the nuts-n-bolts basics day in and day out with little thumb-sucking kids whose parents dream of them playing, but are gonna quit in a month anyway...

ALL of these experiences were fantastic for me, and I wouldn't trade them for anything. Teaching was an eye-opening, ear-expanding experience and it didn't make me a faster, bigger, badder player (like 1000 bpm shredding or five-octave arpeggios...)

It made me a SOLID player, a TIGHT player capable of locking into a pocket with a drummer and a bass player and making real music as opposed to the crap I used to think was good when I was practicing in my parent's basement.