#1
so ive been writing some music for the band im in and in a few songs i end up using a chords which the formula is 1345

now im kinda stumped as to what it should be called
a sus4 chord? with a the third added
a regualar majorchord witht he fourth?

usually id call it add 11 or soemthing but wouldnt that be if the fourth was an octave higher? and i was just wondering if the name would change considering the voicing

this has been buggin me for a while and google was no help
thanks for any replies
#3
the "add" convention isn't really meant to be octave specific - though I suppose you can use it if it's to specify where in the voicing you want the extension.

But ya, like MDC said add11 (or 4 if you're that guy).
#4
Quote by mdc
add4 or add11 depending which octave the 4 is in.



oh cool thanks i was under the impression that the addX name only worked if it was higher like an add9 chord
and yeah it would be add4
like a Dadd4 would be D F# G A
all in the same octave


Quote by chronowarp
the "add" convention isn't really meant to be octave specific - though I suppose you can use it if it's to specify where in the voicing you want the extension.

But ya, like MDC said add11 (or 4 if you're that guy).


yeah...im that guy
thanks for the quick replies though i have a shite memory so being able to name things really helps
Last edited by supersac at Mar 5, 2012,
#5
Chord labels don't really indicate what range the chord tones are in. All the tones are conceptual and can be thought of as "pitch classes" rather than any specific tone placement. That is, the B in Cmaj7 could be in any octave above the C. It is an abstract label rather than a spatial one.

The distinction between 11 and 4 isn't really for the difference in range, but rather for their scalar function. 4 basically indicates an "avoid" note, which always follows a major 3rd because of the half step. However, if there's a whole step between the 3rd and 4th (minor chords or #4ths), then it's an extension indicated by 11. Apply same logic to 6ths and 13ths.

A sus (suspended) chord specifically means a chord without its 3rd, so it wouldn't make sense to be a sus chord with a 3rd.

Honestly there's no set convention for your chords, and it really doesn't matter. I've always thought add/sus meant the same thing. If you really need to label, I think something like Cmaj7(4) or C-7(11) or C7(#11) will be suffice.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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Last edited by Xiaoxi at Mar 5, 2012,
#6
Quote by Xiaoxi
Chord labels don't really indicate what range the chord tones are in. All the tones are conceptual and can be thought of as "pitch classes" rather than any specific tone placement. That is, the B in Cmaj7 could be in any octave above the C. It is a abstract label rather than a spatial one.

The distinction between 11 and 4 isn't really for the difference in range, but rather for their scalar function. 4 basically indicates an "avoid" note, which always follows a major 3rd because of the half step. However, if there's a whole step between the 3rd and 4th (minor chords or #4ths), then it's an extension indicated by 11.

A sus (suspended) chord specifically means a chord without its 3rd, so it wouldn't make sense to be a sus chord with a 3rd.

Honestly there's no set convention for your chords, and it really doesn't matter. I've always thought add/sus meant the same thing. If you really need to label, I think something like Cmaj7(4) or C-7(11) or C7(#11) will be suffice.

thanks
...this really clears up alot of questions i had about naming chords
#7
It depends on the function of the chord. For analytical purposes, the name isn't really important.