#1
First of all i need to point out that im talking about twang while using distortion and not on clean channel.
Currently i own two distortion pedals - the Triple Wreck and the Jemini (Steve Vai signature). Lets say i will be using an RG with HSH on position 2 and 4 meaning both the single coil and an humbucker is being used.

With the Jemini i can get some insane twang especially with the volume on the guitar rolled back to 1-3. With the Triple Wreck there is no way in hell im going to get that same twangy tone. I would like to replace the Jemini with something else so im trying to figure out what its best to look at in order to get a similar tone.

I also noticed that if i run a tube screamer with the Jemini it completely kills the twang. I am guessing it has something to do with certain frequencies being boosted/cut, does anyone know?

Thanks.
#2
The Jemini is probably scooped EQ? I haven't used one but that would certainly make for more twang. A tubescreamer is the opposite, huge mid hump, so I'm guessing that's what's going on.
#3
Quote by Roc8995
The Jemini is probably scooped EQ? I haven't used one but that would certainly make for more twang. A tubescreamer is the opposite, huge mid hump, so I'm guessing that's what's going on.

Yes it has somewhat scooped mid, but there isnt a control for it, just a tone knob which i keep at about 9 o'clock. So are you saying scooped mids are the way to go to get some twang? I always read that having no mids is bad because you cant cut through the mix (it also sounds really bad to my ears).
#5
you're gonna have a tough time getting twang at higher distortion levels especially with that pup combo. hum and single together tend to cancel that out unless you back way off on the distortion. you can try uping your highs some and cutting back a little on the mids however doing this will obviously affect your other sounds when not using the 2 & 4 positions. honestly as a strat user that likes to use a fair amount of distortion you tend to loose the twang sound when you use a bunch of distortion.
#6
Quote by monwobobbo
you're gonna have a tough time getting twang at higher distortion levels especially with that pup combo. hum and single together tend to cancel that out unless you back way off on the distortion. you can try uping your highs some and cutting back a little on the mids however doing this will obviously affect your other sounds when not using the 2 & 4 positions. honestly as a strat user that likes to use a fair amount of distortion you tend to loose the twang sound when you use a bunch of distortion.

Yes i agree with you, my aim is to be able to get some serious twang with the volume on the guitar rolled down...

By the way why do you say single and humbuckers cancel the twang? Im pretty sure with exact same settings i get absolutely zero twang using just an humbucker and very little using just the single coil in the middle.
#7
Quote by tappooh
Yes i agree with you, my aim is to be able to get some serious twang with the volume on the guitar rolled down...

By the way why do you say single and humbuckers cancel the twang? Im pretty sure with exact same settings i get absolutely zero twang using just an humbucker and very little using just the single coil in the middle.


your biggest twang sound will come from a single coil in the bridge postition. the twang is from the treble.
#8
Not necessarily - parallel coils like you get in the 2 and 4 position on a strat can add some serious cluck as well. This is nearly the same thing. It wouldn't surprise me that he's getting more twang in position 2 than in 3.
#9
Quote by Roc8995
Not necessarily - parallel coils like you get in the 2 and 4 position on a strat can add some serious cluck as well. This is nearly the same thing. It wouldn't surprise me that he's getting more twang in position 2 than in 3.

Ok, so EQ wise i should go with very low mids and high treble?
#10
Probably, though you're not really adding twang with the EQ, just preserving what's coming from the guitar. You may not need the treble high, and adding mids won't necessarily remove the effect.

Twang is really just a percussive attack with a sharp drop in note volume. Adding mids or gain can reduce twang because they blur note attack and increase that sustained note volume. That means that depending on your setup, adding mids may or may not be a bad thing. Saying where you "should" EQ is very difficult, since even something as simple as adding treble yields very different results on different rigs.

Start with the guitar tone and volume all the way up, and the tone knobs all at noon. Start by adjusting the mids knob, then move on to the bass (readjustment of mids may be needed after) and then treble last. Following formulas like "less mids and more treble" can yield easy results but this way you'll learn more about how to get the most out of your gear.
#11
Quote by Roc8995
Probably, though you're not really adding twang with the EQ, just preserving what's coming from the guitar. You may not need the treble high, and adding mids won't necessarily remove the effect.

Twang is really just a percussive attack with a sharp drop in note volume. Adding mids or gain can reduce twang because they blur note attack and increase that sustained note volume. That means that depending on your setup, adding mids may or may not be a bad thing. Saying where you "should" EQ is very difficult, since even something as simple as adding treble yields very different results on different rigs.

Start with the guitar tone and volume all the way up, and the tone knobs all at noon. Start by adjusting the mids knob, then move on to the bass (readjustment of mids may be needed after) and then treble last. Following formulas like "less mids and more treble" can yield easy results but this way you'll learn more about how to get the most out of your gear.

Thanks for the tips, i will play around with the EQ a bit!