#1
can we guys have a serious, pun-free discussion on the scourge that is the bass guitar's g-string.

my main beef: the lack of beef. i've read up different theories on how to assuage this issue. it just simply is not bassy enough. there's a huge drop off in low end. it's been a while since i played flats (i used to have the roto 88 trubass flats. about as flat as they come). i feel like the increased size and tension may have evened it out the low end on the G string. but i can't really recall. so what i'm asking is how do you address this or do you even care?

so far my ideas are:

- string my P-bass BEAD
- light gauge set for EAD; separate G from much heavier set
- go back to flats

i already have a five string set in my possession, but apparently i'm going to have to widen the hole of my BAII bridge for the B string. before i put in that effort and/or money, i was wondering what you guys felt about this?
#DTWD
#4
Honestly? Flats seem to be boomier on the G than rounds. The problem too is that your typical upright has a really bassy G string and once you hear that, most electrics are going to sound trebly.
#5
Quote by anarkee
Honestly? Flats seem to be boomier on the G than rounds. The problem too is that your typical upright has a really bassy G string and once you hear that, most electrics are going to sound trebly.


yeah. i've definitely noticed the thinness before but it became unbearable under the circumstances you mention. i was recently adapting some tunes to electric for a run of shows with a band i played with a few years back. when i played with them before i had an upright at my disposal, but this time i was flying so i could only bring my electric. it sounded so wrong on the electric G string. it's funny because on upright i probably spend 70-80% of my playing on the D and G strings. when i play electric my tone suffers from that conditioning as i'd like to avoid the G altogether.


i basically just had to add some finesse to my attack on the G string and hit it a lot softer than the other strings to give it a more round sound. i'll definitely look into getting some la bellas maybe. wanna try something new.

i posted that clip of pino on d'angelo's album earlier on another thread. made me realize how much i love that tone.

have you ever tried mixing and matching like people do on upright? like dudes will get steel E and A and gut D and G. i wonder if round E and A and flat D and G would sound any good. or maybe just flat G.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Mar 5, 2012,
#6
I too kind of felt underwhelmed by the G in a lot of circumstances. With faster poppy stuff with a tinge of melodic play, I don't mind it though. My biggest gripe would be when playing heavier stuff it's not heavy, and too much distortion gives it a guitar tone while the other 3 strings sound like a bass, giving it a off kilter overall sound when going between strings.

adjusting the pickup heights can help (remember if your G is quiet, maybe your E A D is too loud)

For my Jazz bass I just got, I'm going BEAD with flats so that's one direction (I'll be playing heavier, fuzzed out stuff). My bronco for now will stay EADG with just a very meticulous setup and listen for evenness (bright fast poppy stuff).
#7
yeah. maybe what i'll do is throw around a little extra cash for a 5 string labella set. if the G string doesn't speak, then i'll worry about doing BEAD. i just figure if many people recommend ignoring the G string altogether as a solution, why even keep it on there? might as well add a string you will use like a low B, gnome sayin'?
#DTWD
#8
I don't have this problem on either my Jazz or my Zodiac, but on both the D and G on my PBass I do. Since it's my first parts bass, I thought maybe there was something I had to adjust further in order to even it out, but perhaps not. I have a set of medium gauge D'addario halfrounds on there right now.
Quote by FatalGear41
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I'd rather go at my hands with a hacksaw than play lead guitar, and I'm only slightly exaggerating.
Last edited by GAPendragon at Mar 6, 2012,
#9
When I buy replacement sets for my Basses I always put a .055 instead of the .045 supplied giving the bass much more punch.
In the 60s the Fender G string was an .054
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#10
Quote by John Swift
When I buy replacement sets for my Basses I always put a .055 instead of the .045 supplied giving the bass much more punch.
In the 60s the Fender G string was an .054


Interesting, I'll keep that in mind.
#11
Quote by askrere
Interesting, I'll keep that in mind.


+1. interesting piece of information.

john, in doing that, do you find that the G string feels much tighter than the other strings? or is just enough difference to make the bass fuller without making the feel of the strings imbalanced?
#DTWD
#12
Quote by primusfan
+1. interesting piece of information.

john, in doing that, do you find that the G string feels much tighter than the other strings? or is just enough difference to make the bass fuller without making the feel of the strings imbalanced?


It doesn't really feel any different, being an old timer I'm still doing 'Eagles' songs like 'One of These Nights', 'Take it Easy' and 'Life In The Fast Lane' where ther 'G' string is used up around the 12th fret, the extra punch provided with it being an .055 really helps.
G&L L2500
Squier Affinity Jazz Bass 5
Ashdown RPM pre-amp
Ashdown Little Giant 1000
300 watt 15" powered cab
450 watt 15" powered sub bass cab
2x10 + horn
1x15x10 + horn
#13
At least that way every string is bigger than an average guitar string.