#1
Maybe its not a big deal, but i keep muting strings when doing chords. Chords have always been my weak point, and Im working on them more often. I was playing our last night, and even though it sounds fine, theres still some strings being muted. Idk if it makes a difference, but it is a pet peave of sorts.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#2
You mean with your fretting hand? If so, just work on your hand posture. Also, practice, but make sure you're using clean technique so that you get the most out of your practice.
#3
Quote by rageahol
You mean with your fretting hand? If so, just work on your hand posture. Also, practice, but make sure you're using clean technique so that you get the most out of your practice.

Ive tried adjusting my fretting hand, and it just doesnt work. Maybe my fingers are too big (they are fatter than most i guess, im a big guy myself.) I did find one that worked.. sorta. it was an awkward position, but it was impossible to play at all. let alone change chords.
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#4
I don't know what else to tell you besides what has already been mentioned. You need to get your fingers away from the strings that you are not fretting.

What helped me was fretting each note individually and getting it clean, and then adding more fingers note by note to form a chord. It took a bit of getting used to, but after a while I just developed enough muscle memory to do that automatically.

What kind of guitar are you using? Maybe using something with a longer scale would help a bit because there is more room between the frets.

Maybe something with a wider/flatter neck also?
Quote by strat0blaster
This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

Quote by Cathbard
I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#5
Changing chords will come with practice, what you want to do for that is make the hand position for the chord and then fret the notes all at ones (in theory).

I personally mainly play bass, but I don't have any difficulty playing chords, but I am a bit slow changing them

But yeah, I don't think hand size would impede your ability to play chords much. Try to keep your thumb around the middle of the neck (on the back obviously!) and your knuckles parallel to the fretboard. I remember I had similar problems when I was starting out so don't worry, it's fine.
#6
I been playin almost a year now. Like I said tho, chords are my biggest weakness. lol
I've played four guitars, my peavey nitro, bullet, ibanez, and acoustic. I had this problem on all of them. even my friends LP. I guess it must be me after all.
Barre chords are fkin me up even more. those are a betch
"A guitar is your personality expressed through six strings"

"I'm cuddly bitch, deal with it"
#7
KEEP PRACTICING

When I first tried to learn a D major chord, quite a while ago- on a guitar with the widest fret board I'd ever seen.... it was buzzing or muting every time...
After a bit (allot) of practice, I can now do it cleanly on a thin necked electric every time.
It's not your fingers, it's you, really focus on getting the finger position down perfectly every time you play it- no matter how long it takes you, and it will soon become second nature- do this with all your chords, and they will all get much easier.

Barre chords, I'm by no means good at them- I only recently manged to do them without horrific buzz, but practice them the same way as the others- although when learning I find a bit of buzz is acceptable, since it helped me drill the `barre` movement with my index finger, one day after a few days of practicing they suddenly clicked, and I could do em buzz-less more often than not
#8
I don't have any difficulty playing chords, but I am a bit slow changing them