#1
Hey UG, I've been wondering, how do I play over the changes in a progression. I've been playing with some bluegrass/folk people and want to make my improvised solos sound a little more structured.

So take an easy chord progression of just G-C-D-G. I play just the G major scale over this, what can I do to accentuate the chord changes? Will it be playing different scales over the IV and V?

Thanks
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
#2
You can still stick the the G major scale and it won't sound bad at all over those chords but i you want to get a little more out of your solo, you could emphasize the notes in the C and D chords that aren't in the G major scale. You could either play the scales associated with the new chords or just think of the notes that make up the chords and focus on fitting them into your solo when the time is right. Overall in my opinion, it depends on the length of the chords. I tend to not switch scales completely when the new chord only lasts 2 beats. (There are exceptions for really slow songs and chords associated with key changes, but in your case of GCDG, there is no key change.)
For example when the song switches to C, you could play a G mixolydian scale or just stick with G and emphasize some notes from the C chord. (The Root 3rd and 5th of a C major are all in the G major scale so this doesn't really work in this situation unless there are additions to the chord that are out of the G major scale.)
Hopefully this makes sense and I'm not just rambling on! Good luck and just keep practicing until you feel comfortable. This is a good skill to get down now and one that takes years and years to master!
#3
thanks for the answer man!
if i were to play a new scale over the C and D chords, would i just use normal major/major pentatonic scales?
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
#4
For the C you could just play a C major scale which is the same thing as a G Mixolydian. The only difference between the C major scale and the G major scale is F# in the G Major scale as opposed the the F in the C major scale. So for me personally I would focus on emphasizing the F while playing over the C chord.
#7
you can also emphasize extensions of the chords so using a B note over the C chord would imply a C Major7 or playing a C over the D chord would give you a D7 feel.

technically you could play in any scale that the chord is found in over each chord so like with the C chord you could use the C major scale or the F major scale or D you can switch to D amjor or A major.

but personally I would stick with G major and put emphasis on the chord tones.
Quote by Dirk Gently
Some pieces are only meant to be played by people with six fingers on their fretting hand. Sorry.
#9
You should download the video (old REH VHS I think, dono if its avaliabe on DVD but I got it off a mate who probably pirated it) called Country Rock: Soloing Concepts by Steve Trovato, it has several examples of impressive solos over that very chord progression.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#11
Quote by ouchies
You can target chord tones/resolve tensions during the changes. For example you could play a hold out a "d" note over a G major and resolve it to an "e" over C major


This. Chord tone soloing connected by lines melodically and intelligently.

Best,

Sean