#1
Recently it's been starting to bother me how little I use my ear. I think of cool ideas and melodies in my head but because I suck at hearing I can't apply it to the guitar no matter how much I fiddle with it. I'm not going to bother saying I know a lot about theory, but I'm above beginner level (before you jump at me, I know using your ear is more important than theory).

How do I go about learning to recognise individual notes and intervals? I've been using that musictheory.net site's exercises and even when I managed to get atleast 8 out of every 10 right, I still couldn't figure out anything. I couldn't even work out a Green Day solo, which is beyond pathetic.
West Ham United
#4
Listening to the notes and the space between them. Its something people generally acquire over years of playing.
#5
I agree! Time and practice. Many players do not actually practice using their ear. Make sure you tune up every time you practice, listen to intervals, listen to what you are doing and always use your ear to figure out songs or riffs.

Do not get discouraged if you are wrong. That is why you practice!
Good luck!
"Is all that we see or seem, but a dream within a dream?"
#6
Quote by King Donkey

How do I go about learning to recognise individual notes and intervals? I've been using that musictheory.net site's exercises and even when I managed to get atleast 8 out of every 10 right, I still couldn't figure out anything. I couldn't even work out a Green Day solo, which is beyond pathetic.


The problem is that you're training the wrong thing. It turns out that interval recognition isn't as important a part of ear training as you think. What you really need to learn is the ability to recognize scale degrees in the context of a key center.

So first download the functional ear trainer from Miles.Be. It's free. It will seems like greek the first few times you use it but you will get better.

Second, get a good book on ear training. I recommend Keith Wyatt et al's "Ear Training for the Contemporary Musician." This book is essentially a course in transcription, working you up from very very basic melodies to complex chord progressions. If your ear isn't very good, the basic melody section will take you a long time - that's okay. Use the functional ear trainer a lot during this time.

In addition, this book will teach you a lot of theory. It's a really great book.

My ear was terrible when I started this course of study - using the book and the functional ear trainer. I could do very well on interval recognition but it wasn't doing me any good. Before I even got very far with it, I was finding I had more ability to transcribe than I thought possible. I've still got a long ways to go but I've gotten really tremendous results from those two tools.
#7
I could do very well on interval recognition but it wasn't doing me any good. Before I even got very far with it, I was finding I had more ability to transcribe than I thought possible. I've still got a long ways to go but I've gotten really tremendous results from those two tools.
#9
Thanks for the responses. So I guess the solution is the most obvious one, just try and figure out more songs by ear.
West Ham United
#11
The solution is to pay attention and listen to what you're playing and how notes sound against each other.

+1 hotspurjr

Ps why do you think interval recognition isnt important? I think its the single most important thing to translating whats in your brain into music.
Last edited by z4twenny at Mar 7, 2012,
#12
Quote by HotspurJr
Sometimes you wonder why you try to help people.

No no, I downloaded the program you recommended and am going to have a look into the book. There wasn't a single post in this thread that got disregarded.
Quote by z4twenny
The solution is to pay attention and listen to what you're playing and how notes sound against each other.

+1 hotspurjr

Ps why do you think interval recognition isnt important? I think its the single most important thing to translating whats in your brain into music.

I do think it's important. I just wasn't sure what to place my focus on.
West Ham United
#13
Quote by z4twenny

Ps why do you think interval recognition isnt important? I think its the single most important thing to translating whats in your brain into music.


Two answers: First, my own experience trying to learn this stuff was going nowhere with interval training, even when I was good at it. When I switched to functional training (which is what most transcribing exercises are, btw) my results started to take off.

Second, think about what happens when you transcribe. For me, at lest, I transcribe functionally - I don't listen to the first note, check the interval to the next note, check the interval to the next note, etc. Rather, I recognize what each note is, relative to the center. Listening to a solo and instantly recognizing, say, where all the 5ths are.

I mean, imagine you hear a major third interval. Great. The problem is, what major third interval? Root to third? Fourth to sixth? Fifth to seventh? Isn't it more useful to be able to recognize that "that's a fourth and that's a sixth?"

It is for me. YMMV.
#14
All i can say is that when i hear the notes i can tell how far apart the notes are from each other. I dont really hear it as root, third, fifth, seventh. I hear it as - initial note (root), next note is a major third up(third) next is a minor third up(fifth) from the current note(third), the next note is a major third up(seventh) from the current note (fifth) etc. and it works pretty well for me. I mean i understand how the notes work functionally but thats not really what comes through when im listening.
#15
using your ear and not your balls is normal for someone who plays guitar at a intermediate level.

Listin to the sounds your making, you dont have to play a fast slur or scale run to be impressive. there will always be people who like your music and dislike it. Be yourself my man!

if you like medium speed stuff u can get by without shredding ( and this route u will have to use your ear big time! to choose the right notes and to know where u wanna go )

If you wanna shred then work on your ear second and your scale runs and speed first.


Good luck bro