#1
I know there's probably a million or more threads about this but I think the world could do with more. I really feel like I don't know where to go, I'm transitioning between chords well enough (bit crap at the moment because my acoustic strings are crap) and I really don't know what else I should learn
#3
start learning basic scales like the pentatonic scale. and try creating music out of the chords you know. if you're keen learn about how chord progressions work, so you can use that as a base for music.

if you want to expand you're knowledge of chords, you should look up on chord exploration. this is just taking your basic chords, moving them around the neck or adjusting a few notes of it to make a new chord. if you find one you like, write it down and later try to make something out of them.

you don't need to know the name of the chord just yet, only how to play it. later on in your learning you will begin putting names to the things you know.
#5
DON'T FOLLOW THESE PEOPLES ADVICE! Okay that may sound harsh but hear me out. You know some chords. That is very good, do you know how to fingerpick a bit? Maybe find a song that you like to play that uses the chords but with a fingerpicking style and that varies it a bit?

The scale approach: Playing scales has one single purpose and that is basic knowledge of how your fingers move(and this could also be found by playing random notes and paying very much attention to how your fingers move or study anatomy). There's nothing musical about them except that they follow a strict mathematical pattern(which happens to sound either happy or sad or melancholic or chaotic or whatever). If you start by playing scales over and over like so many others you'll probably end up a mechanical guitar player. If that's what you want then I wont stop you and I will encourage this.

BUT if what you really want to do is play music or play guitar for fun and for the experience of great music and maybe one day figure out what kind of music you like the most and make your own music. You'd be much better of just learning songs that you like. When you start playing guitar there are much more pressing concerns than to know how to play scales, these are as following:

5. Ergonomics/Comfort: is it comfortable to hit the strings like you are, change the chords like you are and so on, if not find a way that is.
4. Economics: is it economical to hit the strings like you are change the chords with the motions you do, does it take up too much time? Does it feel strange anywhere in your body? Do you happen to tense your elbow, forearm, neck, shoulders, or even stomach? Do you need to use the motion you are, do you press lightly enough on the frets?
3. Inspiration: inspiration comes from greek and means "to breathe in" basically. To breathe with music is another concept which is quite usually brought up, it's something you want to do, move with the music, feel the music even in your breath. Playing scales has none of it, it's a strictly mechanical approach to music with no inbreaths or outbreaths. Phrases of music usually have a soul, they breathe, it's like somebody speaking. This takes a lot of practice but you will enjoy it.
2. Having fun: Inspiration and having fun help each other a lot. If you like the music you're playing, you will love playing it and it will lead you to try to find more things you have fun playing.
1. HAVE FUN PLAYING THE GUITAR, YOU'RE NOT A MACHINE AND I LOVE YOU!
#6
Quote by LewisG12345
I know there's probably a million or more threads about this but I think the world could do with more. I really feel like I don't know where to go, I'm transitioning between chords well enough (bit crap at the moment because my acoustic strings are crap) and I really don't know what else I should learn

It really isn't any more complicated than - learn more of the songs you want to play.


Just don't over-stretch yourself and make sure your short-term goals are realistic and achievable. At this stage trying to learn, for example, Through The Fire and The Flames isn't a realistic option and trying isn't going to get you very far or help you progress. However I'm pretty sure you'd be able to nail a few AC/DC songs with a little hard work.
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#7
Are you able to pick a couple of notes in between chords? Maybe a little hammer on or pull off or something, to add a little spice to the chord changes
#8
Quote by vincentizghra
DON'T FOLLOW THESE PEOPLES ADVICE! Okay that may sound harsh but hear me out. You know some chords. That is very good, do you know how to fingerpick a bit? Maybe find a song that you like to play that uses the chords but with a fingerpicking style and that varies it a bit?


Wow. That was truly adorable and I wish I had some of what you were smoking.

The link I posted is loaded with simple theory and technique advice. If you're a beginner looking to get better, that site's pretty much the end-all for that.
#9
If you start by playing scales over and over like so many others you'll probably end up a mechanical guitar player. If that's what you want then I wont stop you and I will encourage this.
#10
Quote by rrsis
If you start by playing scales over and over like so many others you'll probably end up a mechanical guitar player. If that's what you want then I wont stop you and I will encourage this.


Well... no, basically. You become a mechanical player by allowing the mechanics of what you're doing to become more important than the sound. It doesn't matter how much you practice scales; as long as you keep the sound in the front of your mind then you'll never be mechanical.
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#11
Quote by rrsis
If you start by playing scales over and over like so many others you'll probably end up a mechanical guitar player. If that's what you want then I wont stop you and I will encourage this.


No.

What Zaphod said is correct. You're only going to become mechanical if you let the scales "box" you in, so to speak. It's quite easy to do. Learning scales alone will not do this.

TS, I'm assuming you're still in the beginning stages of learning how to play guitar. You've got the world in front of you. If you're like many guitar players at this particular level, I suggest you start learning songs you like. While doing this, make sure to pay attention to your technique and don't develop bad habits that you'll spend time correcting later on.

You mentioned having an acoustic guitar, so I'm also going to make the assumption you don't currently own an electric. Should you choose at some point to start focusing on lead guitar, I highly recommend investing in an electric.
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#12
Quote by rrsis
If you start by playing scales over and over like so many others you'll probably end up a mechanical guitar player. If that's what you want then I wont stop you and I will encourage this.


no. only if you allow it, and value that type of music. what learning scales and theory teaches is the ability to understand a major foundation of music, both on a technical and theoretical level. it allows you to remove barriers and play the music in your head, or the music that you feel. like most things, its how you use a scale that defines your music. you can't just pick up a guitar learn a few chords and assume that this form of intellectual minimalism is the only type of music that allows for emotion.

im really not sure how this idea of scales developed into thinking its only good for heavy lick based shred. all it is, is learning what intervals produce certain sounds and feelings. this leads into how chords are created, how progressions are created, and over all; what is musically acceptable to play bar 1 or 2 rules. That's something you can't just wing, you need to know these.
#13
Quote by vincentizghra

The scale approach: Playing scales has one single purpose and that is basic knowledge of how your fingers move(and this could also be found by playing random notes and paying very much attention to how your fingers move or study anatomy). There's nothing musical about them except that they follow a strict mathematical pattern(which happens to sound either happy or sad or melancholic or chaotic or whatever). If you start by playing scales over and over like so many others you'll probably end up a mechanical guitar player. If that's what you want then I wont stop you and I will encourage this.


You sir, are an idiot.
Learning and scales opens up a whole new side to playing guitar and learning the notes of a scale (and why they are in that scale) is essential to composing.
You're only a mechanical guitar player if you let that limit you but not embracing it at all will just make you a shitty guitarist.