#1
I'm wondering what some good classical guitar brands would be. I am wanting to learn classical guitar, more for songwriting than covering pieces. I am looking at something like this Fender: http://www.long-mcquade.com/product...S_Classical.htm

But because its a Fender, and Fender are more known for their electrics, I'm not so sure if this would be good or bad.

I'm looking to spend about $250 for one. I'm looking for an I-kind-of-know-what-I'm-doing-but-I'm not-awesome-yet guitar, if that makes sense. Thanks.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#2
http://www.guitarcenter.com/Yamaha-CG122MC-Cedar-Top-Classical-Guitar-712805-i1522798.gc

I can recommend Yamaha and Cordoba guitars for this price range. They make great beginner level classical instruments. As always, try before you buy.

Do not buy a slim body instrument or one with a cutaway if you intend to play without amplification. They seem to be optimized for electric rather than acoustic playing.
Last edited by shreddymcshred at Mar 7, 2012,
#3
So I'd be alright going with Yamaha?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#4
Yes. I study classical guitar exclusively. I recommend these brands to any of my students in your position
#5
Quote by shreddymcshred
Yes. I study classical guitar exclusively. I recommend these brands to any of my students in your position


Any experience with Ibanez classicals?

What I am aiming to use the guitar for are piano-like cleans, and fairly good volume. Arpeggios, moving bass-lines, so classical music. I'm not trying to emulate Bach or Chopin or any other classical composer's pieces, I just want something that'll sound good, and give me another option to write with. Fingerpicking on my acoustic just doesn't feel the same as a classical.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#6
While ibanez and fender both make great electric guitars, they aren't very big players in the classical realm.

I would definitely try them if you have the chance, but my experience with yamaha and cordoba affords me the comfort of recommending them.

If you want the greatest level of clarity, you will have to grow your right hand fingernails. This is especially important for your thumb, as the bass register is muddier by nature.
#7
Okay. I was kind of leaning towards the Yamaha to begin with, so that's good. I pick at my fingernails, which is terrible for guitar, and even more so for classical. Any model in particular that you'd recommend? Whats the difference sound wise between guitars with and without a cutout?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#8
The cutaway takes volume away from the chamber, and makes the top a bit smaller. More expensive guitars can use the cutaway effectively because they are built and braced in a way that supports a cutaway (and they have more responsive tops). If you are recording with a line input rather than a mic, this point is moot.

As for the specific models, the C40 is a solid entry level instrument. I used one to successfully audition for my undergrad.

The CG122MC and CG122MS are the same guitar with the exception of the top. Cedar tends to be warmer, and spruce tends to be brighter. I can't stress enough that it is very important to try any acoustic instrument before you buy it.

When I bought my concert guitar, I went to a shop, sat down, and played about 10 different guitars. I found the most expensive of the selection to be lacking; they were really pieces of furniture rather than functional instruments. I also played warm spruce guitars, and ultimately bought a bright cedar guitar.

Moral of this anecdote: You can't make your assumption on price, rule of thumb, or even recommendation alone. Listen to each instrument. Don't worry about the kinds of wood used or specs at first, just find a guitar that can meet your goals.
#9
Well thats going to be a pain in the ass. I don't even know when I could even try a guitar as I don't live in the city. I plan on this thing to get beat up to, not by abuse but by regular playing and such, and will most likely replace my regular acoustic guitar.

I have played classical necks, and although, like all guitars, the shape differs, the necks seemed similar; I liked the general profile and width. I hate to take gambles on instruments, but eventually I may have to just take a gamble, order a guitar sight-unseen, and hope I like it...

Thanks a lot for the help by the way
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#10
No problem. Other notable differences in necks are the zero-radius fingerboards and the string spacing.

good luck!
#11
Quote by shreddymcshred


As for the specific models, the C40 is a solid entry level instrument. I used one to successfully audition for my undergrad.

.


Really? I agree for the most part that you can't judge the quality of an instrument on price alone, but at a certain point I think you can.

I've also been playing Classical for a while now and I started with a Yamaha CG101A. So yeah, yamaha.
#12
Yep.

A good professor can separate technique flaws from instrument flaws. It's about how you use the instrument.

That being said, I was basically commanded to get a more expensive instrument for my second year, which I did. I didn't outgrow that one until I graduated.
#13
Classicals do have a more "concrete" for-lack-of-a-better neck profile though, right? For example, I love the neck on my Tele, but dislike the neck of my Schecter.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#14
Quote by shreddymcshred
Yep.

A good professor can separate technique flaws from instrument flaws. It's about how you use the instrument.

That being said, I was basically commanded to get a more expensive instrument for my second year, which I did. I didn't outgrow that one until I graduated.


Of course, I've been told my tone is " like butter " on my CG101A but having a better guitar can definitely help.
#15
Quote by AWACS
Classicals do have a more "concrete" for-lack-of-a-better neck profile though, right? For example, I love the neck on my Tele, but dislike the neck of my Schecter.


I'm not quite sure what you mean by concrete. It's not an instrument that typically has a slim profile neck though
#16
Quote by shreddymcshred
I'm not quite sure what you mean by concrete. It's not an instrument that typically has a slim profile neck though


Sorry, bad word. In general though, all classicals should have a fairly similar neck profile, whereas with electric guitars, you have a wide and thin Ibanez Wizard-like neck, or a very thick, kind of narrow Gibson 50's neck, and everything else in between.

Hopefully I explained myself a little better. I should be getting a chance to get to go guitar shopping too, which is always a plus.


EDIT: So what if I want to spend $400 to $500 CAD now, what options does that open up to me? Brand wise and model wise?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
Last edited by AWACS at Mar 7, 2012,
#17
at that price point I would try to grab a used guitar. Used instruments at that range initially may have cost 1.5 to 2 times what you pay for them new. This opens up instruments like rodriguez guitars and alhambra guitars. You may also find some built by small name luthiers, of which there are many.

For 400-500 dollars, make sure you take your time and try different instruments.


ALWAYS make sure you know where your money is going too. If you drop 500 on an instrument, make sure it's because of the top and not because of fancy backs, sides, or ornamentation.
#18
I want to go for more of a work-horse guitar. What should I be looking for, for brands and models with new guitars and old ones as well?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#20
Okay, so what would you guys recommend from Yamaha for about $400?

Okay, so I have a few options from Yamaha, which is most likely what I'll be going with as they have more popular guitars, even though it might be worse in the same price range, but I will be able to find them in more stores.

I was looking at the CG182, which comes in Spruce and Cedar tops. (Whats the difference between spruce and cedar? more treble and more bass respectively?) I am most likely going to be both finger and flat picking on this guitar.

Spruce: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/yamaha-cg182s-spruce-top-classical-guitar/712810000010000

Cedar: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/yamaha-cg182c-cedar-top-classical-guitar

Thanks again guys.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
Last edited by AWACS at Mar 9, 2012,