#1
What with the internet age and cell phone technology the old form (hand-written letter) has become obsolete. It's simply quicker to send e-mails and texts nowadays and not just to close partners and family but pretty much everyone you know. I assume written language will have to adopt and change due to this rapid shift. From what I've seen I don't think it's wild to assume emoticons will soon become different forms of punctuation.

I created this thread to discuss how the language (English or otherwise if you wish) might change in the near future, be it 20 years or a 1000. Thoughts?
Quote by mcw00t
"so you mean if the father is sterile, the kid will be sterile too?"

Proof God exists and evolution is a lie:
Quote by elguitarrista3
the prove is u because u did n create urself and ur parents dindt and their parents didnt and so on and we are not monkeys peace

#4
of course its going to change, read something by Shakespeare. Its hard to even get through sometimes. I believe Benjamin Franklin thought the english language was kinda retarded and wanted to get rid of a lot of letters of the alphabet or make a whole new one.

Color used to be spelled Colour (still is in England)
Really being spelled Rly is the same type of thing.

Im a bit out of it but i think i made a point
#6
Quote by Rust_in_Peace34
What with the internet age and cell phone technology the old form (hand-written letter) has become obsolete. It's simply quicker to send e-mails and texts nowadays and not just to close partners and family but pretty much everyone you know. I assume written language will have to adopt and change due to this rapid shift. From what I've seen I don't think it's wild to assume emoticons will soon become different forms of punctuation.

I created this thread to discuss how the language (English or otherwise if you wish) might change in the near future, be it 20 years or a 1000. Thoughts?

Suggesting that the written word has entirely lost value, or term it 'obsolete' because it's easier to write an e-mail or text is so 100% the foundation of what's wrong with language, I can't even begin to describe it.

Frankly, I shudder to think about the future of written language. If the amount of functional decay I've seen since I was young is any indication, pretty soon people won't need text at all; just a series of grunts and vulgar thrusts that 'convey the idea - who cares how it's spelled?'
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#7
Quote by BlitzkriegAir

Really being spelled Rly is the same type of thing.



you can't just remove vowels from a word, how would you distinguish "really" from "rally" and "relay"?


I would rather have the person I'm messaging be able to understand my message than save 3 seconds typing it.
Last edited by rickyj at Mar 7, 2012,
#8
Just remember that it's only a theory!!!!1!!!on1!!!!!!!!!!.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#9
Quote by strat0blaster
Suggesting that the written word has entirely lost value, or term it 'obsolete' because it's easier to write an e-mail or text is so 100% the foundation of what's wrong with language, I can't even begin to describe it.

Frankly, I shudder to think about the future of written language. If the amount of functional decay I've seen since I was young is any indication, pretty soon people won't need text at all; just a series of grunts and vulgar thrusts that 'convey the idea - who cares how it's spelled?'



Exactly this. Words are no longer words. As long as we understand sounds and can somehow get across ideas with the general idea of how something may be spelled, it's apparently okay.
I'm sorry. "nm u" is one thing, and "up and adam" is also pretty bad (I've seen this actually happen, but at least adam is a word), but shit like "distrupted" and "wensday" are beyond irritable.

It's like we came this far to create actual words to convey our ideas and to be able to communicate as best as we can, and now we're going backwards. Words won't even have to exist. It will just be grunts and sounds that mimic what we think something is represented by. No more hello. Instead, it could be hallo or hillo or even hullew. All will work in the future. How stupid.
#10
Language changes. Tough shit.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#12
I htingk a massiave overhaul is cominga and it's going to put grammera nazis like me out of woark
Check out my band Disturbed
#13
^ LOL at suggesting that the change would somehow be hurtful to language itself. You do understand that while there maybe logic in some grammar our faith in language as is and has been to convey thought is unfounded. That language and modes of communication change simply means adapting to an environment we've created.


Quote by BlitzkriegAir
of course its going to change, read something by Shakespeare. Its hard to even get through sometimes. I believe Benjamin Franklin thought the english language was kinda retarded and wanted to get rid of a lot of letters of the alphabet or make a whole new one.

Color used to be spelled Colour (still is in England)
Really being spelled Rly is the same type of thing.

Im a bit out of it but i think i made a point


^ No shit it changed since Shakespeare, that's several centuries ago. I'm talking about the shift that's exponentially changing every aspect of human life and interaction; the information age. It's not a leap of the imagination to assume during the course of our lifetimes, with this kind of impact, our own language might become foreign to us.
Quote by mcw00t
"so you mean if the father is sterile, the kid will be sterile too?"

Proof God exists and evolution is a lie:
Quote by elguitarrista3
the prove is u because u did n create urself and ur parents dindt and their parents didnt and so on and we are not monkeys peace

#14
Quote by Rust_in_Peace34
^ LOL at suggesting that the change would somehow be hurtful to language itself. You do understand that while there maybe logic in some grammar our faith in language as is and has been to convey thought is unfounded. That language and modes of communication change simply means adapting to an environment we've created.


Yeah and what environment is that? One where we can't do anything without technology and are essentially lazy shits because of it. You say we can't hurt something we are so used to, yet look at these:
-Our general sense of geography is severely lacking. It's the worst it's been in many many years. The fact that people can't find their own country on the map is embarrassing, and don't give me shit about those who can't afford to go to school because believe me many that can that still can't find their country on a map. I know people who have never even heard of Ethiopia or Nigeria or even Cambodia.
-Same goes with history.
-Math. Don't have to go into this.

Technology is here to help, but instead the newer generations have become lazy as hell and thus are getting more stupid and dependent. So many people who graduate from school can't even do long division anymore or even be able to tell you much history about their own country (or even state/province) and you mean to tell me it's ludicrous that our concept of language won't suffer as well? Please.
Last edited by Pagan_Poetry at Mar 7, 2012,
#15
Shortened writing tends to reflect shortened thinking, is my observation.
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#17
It's a shame that the written word is going out of style, because it really is an art form. Calligraphy and even just a plain bit of quality cursive are things that are beautiful to the human eye, and represent a human touch that doesn't come with an email. When you write someone a letter and use good paper, a nice pen, and some quality handwriting, it means a lot to someone. No one does it anymore, though, so I guess it doesn't make any difference.

I'd also like to make one point about the shortening of words. Although you could theoretically argue that there's nothing wrong with our language "evolving," I think that such changes are only good if they preserve the root meanings of words that extend from their Latin, Greek or Slavic heritage. It's a very wonderful thing that we can figure out that the word "psychological" relates to the mind and the word "pathological" relates to disease, simply by looking at their roots. If we start eliminating or distorting these tools, we'll essentially be ruining our own language by making it less logical and harder to understand.
#18
Quote by Pagan_Poetry

-Our general sense of geography is severely lacking. It's the worst it's been in many many years. The fact that people can't find their own country on the map is embarrassing, and don't give me shit about those who can't afford to go to school because believe me many that can that still can't find their country on a map. I know people who have never even heard of Ethiopia or Nigeria or even Cambodia.
-Same goes with history.
-Math. Don't have to go into this.


As was centuries ago. You can't argue that since humanity has much more access to knowledge, it's everyone's obligation and duty to seek it out. Those who search and are intrigued by knowledge, will find it just as always.

Another argument might be that there's no motivation to seek out understanding since we're basically hand-fed everything, from food and premium health care (debatable obviously ) to a daily dose of that ultra-violence and pornography on the intertubes. Yet motivation existed in the past for those who would face execution for their musing, studies and research. Like I said, there will always be those who seek knowledge, it's nothing new that there are only few who are dedicated.
Quote by mcw00t
"so you mean if the father is sterile, the kid will be sterile too?"

Proof God exists and evolution is a lie:
Quote by elguitarrista3
the prove is u because u did n create urself and ur parents dindt and their parents didnt and so on and we are not monkeys peace

#19
there's no such thing as evolution. we all KNOW that God created language in 6 days, and on the 7th he created txt spk.
#20
Quote by girlgerms007
Shortened writing tends to reflect shortened thinking, is my observation.


The new media certainly have their expressive limits, and those limits shape exactly what people write about through them. That fact of those limits is why TS's presumption that they'll render old media obsolete is not a very good one. Things will certainly continue to change, but the old gods aren't going to die anytime soon.
#21
Quote by Rust_in_Peace34
I created this thread 'cause I'm stoned out of my mind.


Fixed.
True story.
Quote by mcw00t
"so you mean if the father is sterile, the kid will be sterile too?"

Proof God exists and evolution is a lie:
Quote by elguitarrista3
the prove is u because u did n create urself and ur parents dindt and their parents didnt and so on and we are not monkeys peace

#22
Quote by strat0blaster
Suggesting that the written word has entirely lost value, or term it 'obsolete' because it's easier to write an e-mail or text is so 100% the foundation of what's wrong with language, I can't even begin to describe it.

Frankly, I shudder to think about the future of written language. If the amount of functional decay I've seen since I was young is any indication, pretty soon people won't need text at all; just a series of grunts and vulgar thrusts that 'convey the idea - who cares how it's spelled?'


And then slowly electricity will start going away, and our houses and other shelter will be demolished. Then we'll start growing large amounts of hair all over our bodies without shaving or bathing. Then finally, we'll look like this.....

#23
Let's all be ballers and speak the English language properly like true gentleniggas, yarramean.


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Art & Lutherie
Last edited by darkstar2466 at Mar 7, 2012,
#24
Quote by Rust_in_Peace34
No shit it changed since Shakespeare, that's several centuries ago. I'm talking about the shift that's exponentially changing every aspect of human life and interaction; the information age. It's not a leap of the imagination to assume during the course of our lifetimes, with this kind of impact, our own language might become foreign to us.

Language is bound to change, it's just one of the things that language does, but I don't think that it'd change so much within our own lifetimes that it'd be foreign to us. It's a much slower rate of change than that. Infact, if anything, language may actualy become more uniform and easier to understand for us.

In Shakespear's time, regional dialects and language inflections in England alone varied so greatly that a person from one part of England often literaly couldn't understand a word that someone from another part of England was speaking, they were effectively almost speaking different languages, (infact, a few hundren years previous to that, they literaly were quite often speaking different languages, but the written word had helped to unify those languages somewhat) but since that time, the English language has become much more unified, and that's a trend that's possibly continuing to this day.

I remember as a child in the late 60s and early 70s going to different areas of Britain on our holidays and listening to the old folks in those different areas talking and hardly being able to understand a word they said, today, my own offspring have never really had the same problem. That's because when I was a kid, the old folks back then had grown up without TV, and their parents and grandparents (who would obviously influence the way they spoke) had grown up without radio, which only became available at the beginning of the 1900s.
TV and radio were greatly responsible for influencing regional ways of talking and making them more unified. When the BBC first started broadcasting in the early 30s they had to hire people with a particularly clear elocutionary accent, often referred to as 'Queens English', 'Received Pronunciation' or even 'BBC English', so that people all over the country could understand them, but more recently, the everyday spoken accent in different regions has become more unified, which in turn has made it easier for people from different regions to understand each other.
Slang words are interesting to study in this subject, because unlike in the past where different areas had their own unique slang words, we now find a trend leaning towards the same slang words being used almost universally.

Today, the internet is probably having a similar effect on language that radio and TV once had, but on a more global scale.
#25
And yet I am still completely baffled by all your northern accents. Don't understand a word.

Until it turns to Scotland, when I can understand it better.
#26
Quote by Dirge Humani
And yet I am still completely baffled by all your northern accents. Don't understand a word.

Until it turns to Scotland, when I can understand it better.


Oh it can still be hard to understand different accents, but if you lived a few hundred years ago, it'd be much harder.
#27
Quote by Rust_in_Peace34
What with the internet age and cell phone technology the old form (hand-written letter) has become obsolete. It's simply quicker to send e-mails and texts nowadays and not just to close partners and family but pretty much everyone you know. I assume written language will have to adopt and change due to this rapid shift. From what I've seen I don't think it's wild to assume emoticons will soon become different forms of punctuation.

I created this thread to discuss how the language (English or otherwise if you wish) might change in the near future, be it 20 years or a 1000. Thoughts?


There will still be situations when formal language is needed: in business, law, science and other fields, and whenever unambiguous intent is important.

In everyday communication with friends we can adopt whatever slang terms or buzzwords we want, of course. However, if emoticons become our preferred means of expression it would be a sign that we're just automata with generic minds and cookie-cutter emotions.

It would be a shame to lose good literacy levels to text-speak. I doubt it will happen anyway. There have always been people who can't use 'correct' grammar, and there have always been people who can happily change between formal and informal modes of communication.
#28
Quote by Jehannum
There will still be situations when formal language is needed: in business, law, science and other fields, and whenever unambiguous intent is important.

In everyday communication with friends we can adopt whatever slang terms or buzzwords we want, of course. However, if emoticons become our preferred means of expression it would be a sign that we're just automata with generic minds and cookie-cutter emotions.

It would be a shame to lose good literacy levels to text-speak. I doubt it will happen anyway. There have always been people who can't use 'correct' grammar, and there have always been people who can happily change between formal and informal modes of communication.


I think text-speak will probably develop it's own 'correct' grammar, resulting in 'formal' and 'informal' text-speak.