#1
Hi guys, I'm planning on doing some home recording, and this time, I plan to enter the world of actually micing amps, as studios are bloody expensive, and I'd love to be able to record decent quality stuff whereever I am.

At the moment, I have the following pieces of equipment.

Line 6 UX2 (I'm planning to upgrade it later down the line, any ideas? I'm looking at the Focusrites)

Shure SM58 (I've heard a 57 is ten times better, though I've heard good results with a 58. Regardless, I plan to get a 57 at some point)

I'll be using these to mic a Peavey Valveking 212, and I'll be recording Symphonic Metal, so a fair bit of distortion will be used.

At one point, I plan to put firewire ports in my PC to accomodate the Firewire audio interfaces, and a boom stand is on it's way, so I'll be up and running anytime soon.

So, my question is, am I on the right track with what I plan to buy to record with at a later date, and how do I get the best results out of the gear I already have? I understand that it's common practice to remove the filter from the SM58 when recording guitars, but I don't know if there's any other tactics or tricks to get the best quality out of it.

Thanks
#2
An SM57 is better for micing instruments, the SM58 is best for vocals, though since it is a microphone you can technically record for anything, but the 57 would be better for your situation. I am not familiar with the UX2 but as long as nothing is coloring the input sound, you should get decent results, depending on what recording software you are using. The only thing I am not sure on is recording tube amps at their ideal sound levels. You also gotta think about mic placement.
Axes
Peavey V-Type NTB ST
Peavey PXD 23 II
Jackson JS32T
Ibanez RG 1570
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Blue Royale
ESP LTD EX-50

Amps & Effects
Mesa Boogie Nomad 55
Boss Katana KTN-Head
Roland JC-120
Boss GT-100
Boss ME-80
Zoom G5
#3
Quote by CelestialGuitar
Line 6 UX2 (I'm planning to upgrade it later down the line, any ideas? I'm looking at the Focusrites)

Personally I think the UX2 is vastly superior to a Saffire.

Quote by CelestialGuitar

Shure SM58 (I've heard a 57 is ten times better, though I've heard good results with a 58. Regardless, I plan to get a 57 at some point)

The 57 and 58 are almost identical, the only difference is that the 58 has a shield and the frequency response is ever so slightly different (this only benefits vocals, and rarely at that). This is why I just have a 57 and a pop shield, but I'm not sure how easy it is to do in reverse, removing the shield from the sm58 may damage it, but don't quote me on that.

Quote by CelestialGuitar

So, my question is, am I on the right track with what I plan to buy to record with at a later date, and how do I get the best results out of the gear I already have? I understand that it's common practice to remove the filter from the SM58 when recording guitars, but I don't know if there's any other tactics or tricks to get the best quality out of it.

Thanks

Yeah you'll be able to get decent quality recordings as you are now, maybe a 57 would be an investment. But my real question back to you is: why don't you just plug your guitar into the amazing guitar interface that you already have and use the 500000000 virtual amps that it has built in to it? You'll likely be able to get MUCH better sounds out of that than a mic'd amp imo
#5
Quote by Pg.inc_music
+1 on the just using the interface as your amp.

+2


Also try running the FX Loop Send into your interface and recording that, then running it through a cab emulator/impulse like Poulin LeCab + God's Cab. You're still getting the sound of your amp, but with more control of the final tone.
#6
Yeah, I've tried that to no avail. Pod Farm sounds horrific, Guitar Rig is very slightly better, but I just can't get something I'm happy with. I've been doing it for ages, and I've had terrible tone after terrible tone, I'm adamant that I will be micing my amp, as I have the tone I want from it.

EDIT: I may try the impulse idea.
#9
Click Here

Kind of a long video but watch it and you will learn a lot.
Gear
Guitars-
Paul Reed Smith SE Custom
Paul Reed Smith Mike Mushok Baritone
Squire Bullet
Carlos Acoustic
Epiphone Banjo
Amps-
Mesa Boogie DC-5
B-52 LS-100 and Matching cab
and tons of miscellaneous stuff
#11
An SM58 is a 57 with a ball on the end. Unscrewing it won't hurt a thing, but don't lose it, and be careful with it once you unscrew it.

Best way to mic an amp is to get as close as you can to it, or at least that is the "textbook" method. The closer you get to the actual cone, or speaker, the more "present" and easy to mix your guitar will be, but it may get tinny if you creep too close to the center. Toward the outer edge is warmer, but you lose presence.

Put a set of headphones on and move that thing around. What do you hear? Find a sweet spot.

Also consider miking through the BACK of the speaker cab. Only keep in mind this will be out of phase with any DI signal you may have recorded and you may want to look at that waveform (which isn't a bad idea anyway) to make sure you aren't cancelling anything else (like guitar II or your bass or something).

You can always phase-flip a track, too, so if the back is your sound then it's easy enough to flip that phase out.

A more advanced (and some would say professional) technique is to combine the close-mic 57 (or similar dynamic mic) with a distant condenser.

Most people would recommend an AKG 414 or a Neumann U87 (ribbon) mic about 3-5 feet back, and about 36" to 48" off the ground, pointed at the cab. THAT will be a great sound, but you need to think more about noise control since if your upstairs neighbor takes a shit you WILL hear it in that distant mic.

Got to arrange for some quiet time and a room that sounds pretty good. Keep your heating/air off and prevent any pipes or appliances from running while you are recording.

That's why it's a "professional" technique. It tends to get complicated.