#1
Hey guys, I saw 2 reeeeally nice guitars for a decent price. The first one is an Epiphone Les Paul Ultra II with a faded cherry sunburst on a quilted maple top and it looks purely amazing. The other guitar is only $100 more and it is the Gibson Flying V Faded in faded cherry (which actually doesn't have too much cherry on it, and looks morel like faded brown to me which is a good thing).

I was gonna ask this on mylespaul forums but I realized that a lot of biased answers would come from there lol. So this is pretty much comparing Epiphones highest quality model and guitar style with Gibsons lowest quality model and I wanted to know which one would sound better. I've already got a epiphone les paul 100 and it has 2 nice sounding humbuckers, the body is a lot thinner than normal les pauls and the finish looks O.K. so I've already sort of had the les paul experience but this epiphone les paul ultra II looks great and has 2 humbuckers and a nanomag acoustic pickup (correct me if I'm wrong with the name) and 2 output jacks. I've heard it in the promos and it sounds really great.

And the gibson flying v faded is only $100 more and it is a gibson. Anyone know which would sound better? Anyone know which would have higher quality and how much the difference would be?
#2
The Gibson is much higher quality but offers nothing unique. The ''acoustic'' pickup the Epi has doesn't really sound much like an acoustic guitar, but it does an okay enough job and most importantly it can be blended in with the regular pickup sound to create lots of tones; however the guitar itself is lower quality.

So it's quality vs versatility. Whether one is a better buy than the other is up to you and what you need. They're not really comparable since they fill different roles.
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#3
Quote by MrFlibble
The Gibson is much higher quality but offers nothing unique. The ''acoustic'' pickup the Epi has doesn't really sound much like an acoustic guitar, but it does an okay enough job and most importantly it can be blended in with the regular pickup sound to create lots of tones; however the guitar itself is lower quality.

So it's quality vs versatility. Whether one is a better buy than the other is up to you and what you need. They're not really comparable since they fill different roles.


Thanks for the reply. Will the open coils on the gibson be comparable to the open coils on epi lp-100? Cos lp-100 is at the bottom of the epi food chain and flying v faded is at the bottom of the gibson food chain so I would think they would have similar pickups, the only real difference would be the brand so i could be better off buying the epi les paul ultra ii cos of the acoustic pickup and the dual output, controls etc..

Also, you mentioned that the flying v faded is higher quality, but how much higher and in what way? The quality of the les paul ultra ii can't be that low cos the lp100 feels pretty good to me and my guitar teacher that has been playing for 35 years and owns a fender and some other really high quality guitars says that this lp100 sounds, looks, and feels really high quality for $320.
#4
Whether one is a better buy than the other is up to you and what you need. They're not really comparable since they fill different roles.
#5
Quote by cheezstik
Will the open coils on the gibson be comparable to the open coils on epi lp-100? Cos lp-100 is at the bottom of the epi food chain and flying v faded is at the bottom of the gibson food chain so I would think they would have similar pickups, the only real difference would be the brand
There's far more to pickups than that. The pickups in the Flying V Faded use different wire and magnets than the ones in your Epiphone and they're made to sound different. Basically, the pickups in the Gibson are brighter-sounding, have a tiny bit more output and are clearer and more responsive.

Also, you mentioned that the flying v faded is higher quality, but how much higher and in what way?
In literally every way: the wood is higher quality, the hardware is made and fitted better, the electronic parts are better made, the nut is solid corian (a kind of bone-like material) instead of hollow plastic, the frets will be fitted more evenly, the tuners are more sturdy, and so on. The Gibson also has a very thin nitro finish and is made of less pieces of wood, so it'll resonate louder and sustain longer.

The quality of the les paul ultra ii can't be that low cos the lp100 feels pretty good to me and my guitar teacher that has been playing for 35 years and owns a fender and some other really high quality guitars says that this lp100 sounds, looks, and feels really high quality for $320.
The Ultra II is a good guitar for the money - I have one myself and I think it's the best ''affordable'' guitar I've ever played. But in the grand scheme of things the quality of the wood and other parts used to make it, and how well it is put together, ranks lower than a regular Gibson and far, far below the top-end Custom Shop Gibsons, Fenders and PRS guitars (as well as many other high-end brands).
It's all relative. A guitar that is amazing to a beginner may be quite bad to a professional. A guitar that is great for a professional may seem like a pointless waste of money to a casual player. Someone who plays lots of styles of music will say the Epiphone Ultra is better than the Gibson V, but someone who is happy with just the basic humbucker tones of the V will say the Epiphone is useless.
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#6
I hate to be "that guy" but what styles do you play? Also, what gear do you have now?
#7
I used to own a Gibson Faded Flying V. While it was a gorgeous guitar, i had a few issues with it.

!. The tuners. After about a year, it got to the point where I would do one bend and on the G or B strings and it would fall a half step out of tune. yes, the string were stretched. I'm not an idiot. Seriously, my Korean Schecter holds tune better than the Gibson did, and it's 6 years old now, all stock. The Gibson was less than 2 years old.

2. This one is hard to describe...the feel was just...bad. The neck was nice and thin and was okay towards the nut, playing metal riffs and chords, but soloing was almost impossible on the higher frets because it felt like i had to fight the guitar to play it, even with the action being set low.

Basically i wish I had taken the $600 i payed for it new and spent it on the Ibanez V Blade i was also looking at for the same price.

But, I did like this about it.

1. Great tone. The pickups are hot and got a really great thrash sound, as well as nice solid, thick cleans. No complaints in the tone department.

2. It was REALLY light compared to some of my other guitars because it's pretty much hollow under the pickguard.

3. There was no neck dive. With a strap, the neck would actually angle up which made it a lot easier to play standing up.

As for the LP Ultra 2, if I had to pick between the two of them I would probably take the LP. I've played it a few times and I really loved the tone, even though as MrFlibble said the nanomag pickup doesn't sound exactly like an acoustic. I really like that it's much lighter than your average LP as well. While the wood and some of the quality MIGHT be better on the Gibson, it's kind of a crap shoot because the Faded series had a lot of lemons in it, though it seems like it was the SG's more than the Flying V's. Hope this helps some.
#8
Quote by cjstylez97
I hate to be "that guy" but what styles do you play? Also, what gear do you have now?


I don't understand what you mean by that guy? But anyway, my gear, you can barely call it gear lol, i have a epi lp-100, sx custom blue burst acoustic and a nevada 15 watt practice amp that came with a friends strat. I was gonna buy a cheaper guitar and a digitech multi-fx rp355 + better amp but i thought i wouldnt need it so im gonna get one of these now.

Quote by shecter guy
I used to own a Gibson Faded Flying V. While it was a gorgeous guitar, i had a few issues with it.

!. The tuners. After about a year, it got to the point where I would do one bend and on the G or B strings and it would fall a half step out of tune. yes, the string were stretched. I'm not an idiot. Seriously, my Korean Schecter holds tune better than the Gibson did, and it's 6 years old now, all stock. The Gibson was less than 2 years old.

2. This one is hard to describe...the feel was just...bad. The neck was nice and thin and was okay towards the nut, playing metal riffs and chords, but soloing was almost impossible on the higher frets because it felt like i had to fight the guitar to play it, even with the action being set low.

Basically i wish I had taken the $600 i payed for it new and spent it on the Ibanez V Blade i was also looking at for the same price.

But, I did like this about it.

1. Great tone. The pickups are hot and got a really great thrash sound, as well as nice solid, thick cleans. No complaints in the tone department.

2. It was REALLY light compared to some of my other guitars because it's pretty much hollow under the pickguard.

3. There was no neck dive. With a strap, the neck would actually angle up which made it a lot easier to play standing up.

As for the LP Ultra 2, if I had to pick between the two of them I would probably take the LP. I've played it a few times and I really loved the tone, even though as MrFlibble said the nanomag pickup doesn't sound exactly like an acoustic. I really like that it's much lighter than your average LP as well. While the wood and some of the quality MIGHT be better on the Gibson, it's kind of a crap shoot because the Faded series had a lot of lemons in it, though it seems like it was the SG's more than the Flying V's. Hope this helps some.


Really? Anyone else have the flying v faded for more than a year and have similar experience? Tuning stability is one of the most important qualities to me. My lp100 is nearly a year old now and it still sounds and stays in tune like brand new, which is better than my teachers fender, he had to retune at least 5 times in 30 mins. I'll probably just play both of them at the store and see which one feels, sounds, looks, and stays in tune better. Thanks for the answers though guys.
#9
Quote by cheezstik
I don't understand what you mean by that guy? But anyway, my gear, you can barely call it gear lol, i have a epi lp-100, sx custom blue burst acoustic and a nevada 15 watt practice amp that came with a friends strat. I was gonna buy a cheaper guitar and a digitech multi-fx rp355 + better amp but i thought i wouldnt need it so im gonna get one of these now.


Get a new amp unless your current guitar is un-playable.

Let the +1s begin!
Quote by FEngHLyan

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She insists to wear this lights.

I don't think so.

How can I persuade her?
#10
I would suggest to 'shecter guy' that his tuning problems are more to do with set up and his playing problems are down to personal preference/technique. The simple fact of the matter is that the tuners are on the Gibson are about as sturdy as you can get, and the nut is made of good material (better than you'll find on any MIK or MIC guitar) and cut by machine and is accurate to within 0.006mm.
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#11
Quote by JKHC
Get a new amp unless your current guitar is un-playable.

Let the +1s begin!


I'll probably save up for a new amp soon after i buy a multi fx, cos really, this amp is OK for cleans and actually sounds pretty nice on overdrive. And the only person hearing it is me with my low standards in my medium sized bedroom anyway and when my friend with a 20 watt came over, he said he was pretty impressed with how good and loud it sounded for its size.

Quote by MrFlibble
I would suggest to 'shecter guy' that his tuning problems are more to do with set up and his playing problems are down to personal preference/technique. The simple fact of the matter is that the tuners are on the Gibson are about as sturdy as you can get, and the nut is made of good material (better than you'll find on any MIK or MIC guitar) and cut by machine and is accurate to within 0.006mm.


Well still though, if it goes out of tune easily after a year then it doesn't seem too appealing. My lp100 is a year old now and it still stays in tune after i hit the strings too hard, down tune way lower than i should and have a 12 as the high e. Sometimes when I don't change the tuning it stays in tune for weeks! Even after a really hot summer day in Australia, the tuning stayed unaltered, and the only mod i've done is removing the pickup selector ring and the pickguard and surely that won't make a difference.

I'll just play both of the guitars at the store and see which I like, and if it starts to go out of tune I'll get it replaced / repaired via warranty.
#12
Quote by cheezstik

Well still though, if it goes out of tune easily after a year then it doesn't seem too appealing. My lp100 is a year old now and it still stays in tune after i hit the strings too hard, down tune way lower than i should and have a 12 as the high e. Sometimes when I don't change the tuning it stays in tune for weeks! Even after a really hot summer day in Australia, the tuning stayed unaltered, and the only mod i've done is removing the pickup selector ring and the pickguard and surely that won't make a difference.

I'll just play both of the guitars at the store and see which I like, and if it starts to go out of tune I'll get it replaced / repaired via warranty.
The point is that the tuning problems he experienced are almost certainly due to him not restringing the guitar properly and/or having it set up poorly.

Let me put it this way: I have a Gibson behind me with the same bridge, nut and tuners as that Flying V I also have, a foot away, an Epiphone LP Ultra II. The Gibson in question has had the same strings on it for almost two years and tuning never slips. Neither does the Epiphone, though that is a much newer guitar. As point of interest, I've got another Epiphone, about seven years old now, that also never has any tuning problems - and that one has worse tuners than either the Gibson tuners or the ones on the Ultra II.

In short, tuning problems are almost always due to the user, not the guitar. The few times there is a problem with the guitar itself that is making it go out of tune, it's virtually always the nut being worn down, which isn't something that happens to nuts made of decent material (like the nuts Gibson use).

Again, I'm not particularly championing either guitar, and you absolutely should try both, I'm just saying that it's quite wrong to claim any Gibson has ongoing tuning problems when it's so common for people to simply not be treating the guitar properly. If there is one thing Gibson do right, it's stability.
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#13
Honestly, i think i probably got a lemon, because I was inexperienced and I was an idot and ordered online. If you found a good one, then I think it would last you for a long time. I should have said the whole lesson is to not buy it blindly, so I apologize for that.

To MrFlibble, When i say it was difficult to play, it wasn't so much the set up. No matter how it was set up it felt...stiff compared to my Damien 6 when I had it. That's about the only way I know how to describe it. I'm also positive the tuning issues weren't due to restringing it wrong. i say this because like I said, i never had tuning problems with my Schecter, while I did on my Gibson. Crazy? yes but it happened. I've played other Gibsons that would hold tuning amazingly well, but like I said I believe I may have just had a lemon.

Basically, play both. if the V feels good to you, then I'd say go for it. It's a nice guitar, and will last you for quite awhile. And even if you DID happen to have tuning problems like I did, you could always just get some locking tuners for it.
#14
Hey guys, I decided to go for something in between the two guitars. I'm going to get a gibson les paul studio in faded brown.

But one more question, does anyone know if epi make something similar to the gibson les paul standard faded? I'm talking about the one with zebra pickups and flame maple top that looks a lot like slash appetite les paul guitar. It doesn't even have to be epi, it can be any brand that makes something incredibly similar but for less than $1200. EXCEPT VINTAGE V100 AFD, I'm unimpressed with the cutaway on that guitar, it is way too sharp and I've heard that the qc on those are horrible even though they have a nice tone for the price. And besides, the flame maple top doesn't look flamed enough to me.




If I find one like that, I'll probably get it over the studio or if I can't find either of the guitars, I'll just get an epi honey burst, which hopefully doesn't look too bad.
Last edited by cheezstik at Mar 9, 2012,