#1
So I've been playing guitar for about 5 months, and I've learned a lot of songs like November Rain, Electric Tears and Welcome to the Black Parade. Right now, I've gotten to the point to where I don't feel as accomplished by learning songs that have already been created by someone else. I want to make songs that are similar to Buckethead's, that are pretty complex, but I have no idea how to. So how can I learn to create my own music?
#2
Young Jedi, you have much to learn.

5 months, eh? Well, I'm not familiar with anything Buckethead has done, but you'll want to learn chord progressions and scales. Also, ear training would be beneficial. Keep learning songs done by other artists, since this will help develop your abilities. Gradually work towards being able to take something that someone else has played and make it your own.

A good guitar instructor couldn't hurt either.
#5
Quote by Enjoisk8bording
So I've been playing guitar for about 5 months, and I've learned a lot of songs like November Rain, Electric Tears and Welcome to the Black Parade. Right now, I've gotten to the point to where I don't feel as accomplished by learning songs that have already been created by someone else. I want to make songs that are similar to Buckethead's, that are pretty complex, but I have no idea how to. So how can I learn to create my own music?

5 months? Seriously?

Youve barely scratched the surface, and I'm struggling to believe that you've covered the things youve currently "learned" with anything close to the attention they require. Obviously I can't make a judgement without hearing you play, but in my experience most people can't play for crap after 5 months...no offence intended.

No point worrying about composing stuff like Buckethead yet, that's more like a 5 year goal than 5 months.

If you want to learn to make music the answer is straightforward - start learning about music itself, not just the guitar. Theory knowledge will help you actually understand what youre playing, which in turn makes it easier to create your own music. Without it youre pretty much just blindly following the dots. Likewise you MUST train your ear and ideally start transcribing songs for yourself - after all, if you don't know what things are supposed to sound like how are you supposed to know what you want to use in your song - imagine trying to write story if you didn't know what any of the words meant.

For advice on theory I suggest you visit the Musician Talk forum, lots of clever people hang out in there...
Actually called Mark!

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#6
Definitely learn your theory. I'm only starting to learn theory now after nearly 3 years of playing. I'm making my guitar teacher drill it into my head and it's helping a lot. So i'd highly recommend you learn theory especially for composing your own music.
#7
You just start by putting together things that sound good.
The kind of skill buckethead has takes YEARS to learn, but to make your own music you don't even need to know what you are doing with the guitar.
#8
Quote by Quesenek
but to make your own music you don't even need to know what you are doing with the guitar.


True to some extent. A guitarist who's been playing a week could possibly come up with a ****ing brutal riff (not likely but possible) that sounds awesome, and might be able to compose some very very average songs, but they're by no means gonna be original or any good.

Learning theory is incredibly essential to songwriting, because you can actually make sense of things and know what works and what doesn't. My guitar teacher can randomly whip out the most brutal ****ing guitar solo's on his acoustic and random improv on the spot and if i'd never met him before i'd assume he spent days and days writing that.

Point i'm getting at is if you know your theory well, you should be able to whip out anything and make it sound good without really thinking about it.
It will help your improv to no end and improv leads to songs..

Yeah so, learn theory :p
#9
Quote by Quesenek
You just start by putting together things that sound good.
The kind of skill buckethead has takes YEARS to learn, but to make your own music you don't even need to know what you are doing with the guitar.

You don't need to no, but it doesn't half help.
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#10
i use to do this thing where i would pull a scale out at random, then a chord progression for that scale, then a time signature (regardless of how crap it sounds). then improv on top of that. for at least 10 minutes or so before repeating the process.

i find that out of these sessions, ideas occur. things that i will always end up going back too. so i make sure i record a lot of them. they aren't just solo ideas, but rhythm ideas, timing ideas and so forth. and if anything sounds good, i usually write it down. then from these shards of rhythm and solo ideas, songs can be built (using the idea as a barrier). some times they work, sometimes they don't. others i have to take the idea and do other improv sessions to get the most out of them (rinse and repeat kind of thing).

you could imagine i have a bunch of recordings of a lot of trial and error. im assuming most musicians do as well, especially buckethead.

so this is my approach to writing music. as far learning how to create music, you need to start learning theory. start basics, keys and scales, chord progressions, working fluidly around chord progressions (the caged system is good for this), and then using scales to create solos or shards of musical information that can be accumulated into a solo or song (i.e. playing in 3s, 6s, 7s, in different styles all over the neck).

i think after a lot of practice (and trial and error) you slowly build up banks of musical information; what progressions work well with what scale sounds, how can you approach rhythm, how can you sound outside etc. and eventually all the smaller theories that go into creating music.

this is an extremely round about way of putting it, but its something to keep in mind.
Last edited by Marshmelllow at Mar 12, 2012,