#1
I'm taking a recording class at my college and I'm a bit confused by the following question:

Consider impedance and an audio connection. Which is best input = output, input is higher than output, output is higher than input?


I did some research and my hunch is that input = output is ideal...but that doesn't mean it's realistic. I'm a bit confused and was hoping someone could help explain the concept.

Thanks.
#2
You want to match impedance I believe. I can't explain why as I know little to nothing about impedance except that.

Also I do know that in DC electronics impedance and resistance is the same...
#3
Quote by FireHawk
You want to match impedance I believe. I can't explain why as I know little to nothing about impedance except that.

Also I do know that in DC electronics impedance and resistance is the same...


I thought the same but I'm just really freaking confused by how it all works and how to explain it...
#4
For a electricity consuming-only device: impedence = resistance = LOAD.
For a electricity generating device or for a electrical transformer: impedence = expected resistance coupled to the device = EXPECTED LOAD.

You do understand that a gasoline car engine will work somewhere between roughly 1000 rpm and 10000 rpm. When running below 1000 rpm, the engine will choke, and stop, generally no damage done, and above 10000 rpm , the engine will blow up, often take permanent damage, and before eventually stopping, or disintegrate.

You also do understand that, for a given load the gas engine has a throttle speed at which it performs the most efficiently, delivering a constant amount of power, using the least gas, causing the least wear. The load for which the engine is best suited is called the "output load", understood as the "expected load".

So, what's the "input load" ? It's all that mass built around the engine, the car's chassis and body, including the mass of the engine itself, that the engine will try to move from one point to another, say a few feet.

And now, onto the test bench. You magically rigged the engine's output shaft to one of the wheel axles, and start the engine. ZZZZT!

If you managed to move the car a few feet away and stop everything before crashing in a tree or a wall, you can say the input and output loads are within a workable range, when they are not equal.

If, when you start the engine, the car doesn't move and the engine instantly chokes out, you can say the input load, the mass of the car and the engine, is far greater than the output load of the engine.

If, when you start the engine, the car disintegrates as it shoots off to the moon with the engine screaming like a giant kitchen mixer, then, you can say the output load of that engine was far greater than the input load it was given to move just a few feet away.

Less confused ?

All along this path I tread
My heart betrays my weary head
With nothing but my soul to save
From the cradle to the grave.
Last edited by ColdGin at Mar 14, 2012,