#1
I am in a band, and I enjoy playing in that band. But I am trying to find another band to play in that has more artistic diversity and style, and...basically, its really hard as a Electric Guitarist. I'm a good player, I can sing quite well, and I am young, BUT- I think the problem is that there are so many of us. It seems like everyone on the block plays guitar just as good as everybody else. So postings on musician classifieds are typically looking for every instrument but guitar.
So what do you think, as a guitarist, you should do to make yourself wanted and in demand?


At first, I thought it really had everything to do with anything but the playing itself. It had to do with logistics, making a guitarist a valuable asset if you disregard the playing. So I got a job, I got a car, I got professional gear, and I wrote song after song after song. its basically so that I can reply to ads that say "Must have pro gear, transportation, and a job."

Yet, finding a band is still really hard. This gets me thinking that maybe I should be the one to start the band from scratch as opposed to try to join a existing one.
So here is your:
tl;dr.
what do you do, as a guitarist, that makes you worth it to a band over other guitar players? How do you join a band, and when do you know when a band is good or bad?
How do YOU(I'm sure everyone does it differently) stay on the scene, recruit members, or join as a member?
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio 60's Tribute
SX stratocaster
MIA Fender Stratocaster
Vox AD50 Vox AC15C1 Vox AC30CC2X Laney LH50r
Guitar>Joe Bonamossa Crybaby > AquaPuss> Sparkle Drive> Green Rhino> DejaVibe> Amplifier
CROWN VIC
#2
Not sure how popular this is going to be, but that's why I got a bass.
Originally posted by supersac
mmh no one has seen god...
no one has seen your penis...
...YOUR PENIS MUST BE GOD!
#3
Quote by mitchgosche2011
Not sure how popular this is going to be, but that's why I got a bass.


this is truth

accept it
"The man that hath no music in himself, nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils. The motions of his spirit are dull as night, and his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted."
#4
It requires knowing people. I just started a band with a friend of a friend. It's all about connections - like they say, it's not who you are, it's who you know.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#5
Personally, I believe that a lot of it comes down to the creativity and personality of the band member (in this case, the guitarist). In order to become an indispensable part of a band, you have to be able to offer something that helps the band function at its core. Yeah, having a nice rig helps a lot, but I've met more guitarists/musicians who are absolutely amazing players, but can't afford to pay $2k for a head, $900 for a cab, and a shitload for a guitar. However, I have also met a lot of guitarists who play like shit but have enough money to buy anything they want. I've got a fair amount of 'chops' and can play pretty much whatever I want to, but there are a lot of other guitarists out there that are just as skilled, if not better than myself. I like to think that my approach to song writing, the overall 'sound' that I create within the band, my hard work ethic, and personality are what make me indispensable within my band.

If you're unhappy in the band that you're in, my advice to you is to start looking around for other musicians to form a band with. It may take some work, but you'll probably end up happier in the long run.
#6
all joking aside, being a solid bassist works. I've played bass in two bands, and ended up as the lead guitarist in both. I also met a drummer who I've played guitar with for 5 years now when I played bass in his band.

otherwise, there are lots of things:
- sing really well. I don't me simply being able to hold a tune; I mean take lessons and have the ability to be a true lead vocalist. having 2 or more strong vocalists is incredibly valuable to a band, and being a strong/versatile singer is invaluable to a guitarist. its gives you so much more to bring to the table.
- talk to musicians. go to shows, demo's and everything else. talk to people. you never know who you'll meet (I met my bands current- and best ever- bassist at a product demo at a local shop).
- Post clear adds. know what you want and advertise accordingly. this won't necessarily get you more auditions, but it will get you more good auditions. if you're clear about what you want, its much easier for a band to decide if you might be a good fit than "guitarist with gear".
- be unique. with your playing at least. develop a unique playing style that will set you apart from other players. you don't have to be the fastest or fanciest player to be recognized (jack white for example). this is a major issue in my home scene; every damn guitarist sounds the same. they play similar solo's through similar rigs, and there's just nothing to differentiate between them.
- NEVER BASH ANYBODY. this should be self obvious, but to have as many open avenues as possible, its imperative not to burn bridges. that whiny-ass singer from your old band (we had a diva...), you can hate him. just be quiet about it. you never know who he might know and where it'll lead.
- be patient. you have a band already, so don't go jumping ship for something else before you've really checked it out. you are in the enviable situation of looking before you're out of a band, so take the time to find people that you really want to work with.
#7
Quote by mitchgosche2011
Not sure how popular this is going to be, but that's why I got a bass.
So true it's unreal.

If your sick of being 'just another guitar player', then stop being just another guitar player. Play 8-strings in touch-style, or play drums, or better yet; if you really want to gig a LOT, get an upright bass.

Nobody in music gets gigs like upright bassists. Everyone from jazz trios, to orchestras, to punk bands, want you.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#9
Make yourself attractive as a bandmate to bassists and drummers. Most of them seem to complain about guitarists who are egotistical, irresponsible, drama queens, lazy, bossy, drunks or druggies, etc. If you are none of those things, that's a pretty good selling point. In addition to having good song ideas, pro gear, and transportation, you're practically irresistible.

Another thing I just thought of: if you are outgoing and business-minded, you can also use those skills as selling points. You could act as the band's booking agent and/or manager early on. If you have artistic skills, that makes you attractive as the band's t-shirt, flyer, poster, and CD cover designer. If you have computer skills you can be the website designer/manager. Most band members are happy to hand off those jobs to someone else, so you become really valuable if you can do them rather than having to hire someone.
Last edited by strumandbang at Mar 11, 2012,
#10
^ good ideas there- if you can't offer something unique about your guitar playing, offer something unique about what you can do with the band. Lots of people have a job and some money, but how many of those people know to how effectively manage a Facebook page? It's much harder than it seems as it's gonna be your band's primary marketing tool-but that's the subject of another thread
#11
Invest in a cargo van, dude. If there is one thing I always wished my bandmates had, it was a proper cargo van.



fapfapfap
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#12
Quote by strumandbang
Make yourself attractive as a bandmate to bassists and drummers. Most of them seem to complain about guitarists who are egotistical, irresponsible, etc. If you are none of those things, that's a pretty good selling point. In addition to having good song ideas, pro gear, and transportation, you're practically irresistible.

thats very reassuring to me, thanks. I am not guilty of any of the diva-ing many musicians seem to have-the only problem I have at the moment has to do with how we are structuring songs and forming ideas. I dont even drink.
And I have those other characteristics too, but don't really emphasize them. I am good with a pencil and pen and have made posters for both my bands. I guess I should start advertising that as well.
Just to keep the discussion going, does anyone have some good audition stories, where you knew you nailed the part, or worse, bombed it? Or how about having someone audition for YOUR band and seeing them nail it, or bomb it? I'd love to hear them.
Gear:
Gibson Les Paul Studio 60's Tribute
SX stratocaster
MIA Fender Stratocaster
Vox AD50 Vox AC15C1 Vox AC30CC2X Laney LH50r
Guitar>Joe Bonamossa Crybaby > AquaPuss> Sparkle Drive> Green Rhino> DejaVibe> Amplifier
CROWN VIC
#13
You are really young, you can just start your own band. Thats how all those mediocre random guitar players got their bands. It is tedious but worth it. Once you are known in your local scene it will be easier, you will get requests yourself. And you can easily address a lot of people as a student or college student via bulletin board/electronic bulletin board.