#1
lets say a movie was being shown in a drive in theatre. the movie screen was being powered by 10 quasars. super powerful, super bright. now lets say i teleported 10 light years away, and got out my super telescope and aimed it at the movie screen. i wait ten years and the movie starts playing.

if i asked the question would i be watching the movie flawlessly, what would my answer be?

variables im looking for are what would distort my cinematic experience?
#2
Well there are ten light years of distance containing anything that can cross the path of the telescope...
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LET'S GO BUCKS
#4
You like asking these strange science questions, don't you? I remember that thread about light waves or something or other.
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#5
That gravity thing and any objects that happen to stray through your line of sight.
Last edited by MakinLattes at Mar 11, 2012,
#6
There would be a red shift, and it would be distorted from the very fact that the gravity of the quasars would bend the light.
#7
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
lets say a movie was being shown in a drive in theatre. the movie screen was being powered by 10 quasars. super powerful, super bright. now lets say i teleported 10 light years away, and got out my super telescope and aimed it at the movie screen. i wait ten years and the movie starts playing.

if i asked the question would i be watching the movie flawlessly, what would my answer be?

variables im looking for are what would distort my cinematic experience?


Well the light dispersing, being distorted by gravity and being obscured by other objects? If you're in atmosphere of any kind that'll affect it too. Good question man
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#10
You would have to somehow be able to maneuver so you could keep in line with the rotation of the earth...
#12
Quote by MakinLattes
That gravity thing and any objects that happen to stray through your line of sight.
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#13
It wouldn't work at all because since the earth keeps spinning you'd lose sight of the screen almost immediately (and have to wait 24 hrs until it briefly reappears and the movie is already over, only to move past your line of sight again). Perhaps if you "locked" onto the screen from a satellite which floats outside the earth's atmosphere in a geostationary orbit (meaning your satellite moves along with the earth at exactly the same speed)

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#14
Quote by Dirge Humani
There would be a red shift, and it would be distorted from the very fact that the gravity of the quasars would bend the light.


This, as well as any red/blue shift from any other source of gravity the light travels by.

Also, light goes out in a wave and is most concentrated at the point of origin. If you throw a pebble in a pond the ripple gradually dissipates because it gets dispersed over a wide area. So no, it wouldn't be perfect quality where you were observing this because there would be far less light photons to actually see. Everything between you and the source of light would be a factor as well as others have mentioned.

Actually, the Hubble Space Telescope needs to aim in one direction for a really long time to actually get a good image of certain things due to the amount of photons it takes to create a decent image. It's like using a camera with a really slow shutter speed, but WAY slower.
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#15
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers

if i asked the question would i be watching the movie flawlessly, what would my answer be?



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#16
(continued, just went to make me a sandwich 'cos I don't wanna be found dead next to my computer with this crap being my last contribution to mankind :\ )

...now say you wanted to achieve the same thing (moving along with this landmark of yours at exactly the same pace) from wherever it is that your super telescope is placed: you would have to circle around the earth at an incredible speed since you're already 10 light years away since:

2 π x 10 (the distance between you and the telescope acting as a radius for the perimeter around which you circle the earth) = 62.8

So basically you'd have to cover a distance of 62.8 lightyears in a timespan of 24 hours -> 1 lightyear = 5.87849981 miles × 10². Multiply by 62.8, divide by the speed of light which is 186282 miles per second or 16094764800 miles per day, and you'll end up with a necessary travelling speed of exactly 22937.2 times the speed of light (good luck with that)

...all the while hoping you don't crash into any planets, meteorites and whatnot along your circular journey and constantly putting up with the large number of heavenly bodies that would presumably be blocking your view constantly like AeroRocker said (oh, and don't forget you won't be getting any sound, unless you bring along a copy of the movie on DVD or something and sync it up with the image from your telescope, which would eliminate the need of a telescope in the first place)...

I dunno about you but after weighing all these minor inconveniences against the advantages (none) I'd have to say that in the end I would probably stay in my car and watch the movie from there. Also, I bet you can't get a decent hot dog in space

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Last edited by shwilly at Mar 11, 2012,
#17
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#19
All of the above answers aside, you probably wouldn't even see the film at all. Just the light from it.
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#20
love the replies
Quote by shwilly
It wouldn't work at all because since the earth keeps spinning you'd lose sight of the screen almost immediately (and have to wait 24 hrs until it briefly reappears and the movie is already over, only to move past your line of sight again). Perhaps if you "locked" onto the screen from a satellite which floats outside the earth's atmosphere in a geostationary orbit (meaning your satellite moves along with the earth at exactly the same speed)

wait, explain this? the earth is playing my movie, the earth is rotating, but the movie is only 75 minutes long, im watching alice in wonderland. so would i not just have to make slight adjustments to compensate for 75 minutes of a rotating earth?

also, would i be able to see myself pull up to the drive in movie, **** my girlfriend in the car, smoke a blunt, then step outside and take a piss, get back into my delorean, drive 88mph and teleport?
#21
Quote by jrcsgtpeppers
love the replies

wait, explain this? the earth is playing my movie, the earth is rotating, but the movie is only 75 minutes long, im watching alice in wonderland. so would i not just have to make slight adjustments to compensate for 75 minutes of a rotating earth?

also, would i be able to see myself pull up to the drive in movie, **** my girlfriend in the car, smoke a blunt, then step outside and take a piss, get back into my delorean, drive 88mph and teleport?
Naw man, cos the REAL b*tch would then be the angle at which the screen appears after the earth has moved for even a few minutes: since that screen is pointing "forward" towards the audience on the ground, after a short while (certainly shorter than those 75 minutes you mentioned) the screen would disappear from your line of sight because you're stationary

A drive-in cinema is way too tiny in comparison to the earth for your experiment to work -> you could try drawing a really small square on top of a soccer or b-ball, make your hand into a fist and leave open a peep hole that's just large enough to see that square (if the hole's too large that means your telescope won't be catching a fully zoomed glimpse of the screen, meaning you'd be staring at a miniature movie screening). Now try rotating the ball in any direction while tracking it through your "telescope". See how the shifting angle would quickly render your movie unwatchable? The image you'd be getting would be comparable to you sitting in your living room while your tv starts turning away from you and tilting in all sorts of unfavorable directions

Also, why would you want to watch Alice?? The 3D effect won't come out nicely at all because of the messed up angle!

Your telescope would have to automatically track the projector screen (I mean, if you did it manually you wouldn't have a chance to really enjoy the movie, would you?). The larger the screen, the longer it would be visible, but I'm pretty certain the earth's 24h rotation period is just too short for a 75 minute movie. Placing that monitor on a planet with a longer rotation period (Mercury for example makes a full rotation in like 60 "earthly" days) might just make the whole experience more bearable, but it's too hot over there and your gf would pbbly melt, so let's not do that

The ONLY option you'd have left is installing a screen that points DIRECTLY at the sky exactly on top of the earth's natural north or south pole, so your angle wouldn't shift. The image would still be rotating, but you could compensate that by having the image on your telescope's display rotate as well at the same direction and pace

There, are you happy? Even though I can't think of any at the moment, I bet I could have done like... 3 useful things by now!!!

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Last edited by shwilly at Mar 11, 2012,
#22
youre ruining my dreams...
you could have just said, no aliens would intercept my movie and it would never reach me...
#23
Quote by Dirge Humani
There would be a red shift, and it would be distorted from the very fact that the gravity of the quasars would bend the light.

given that the nearest quasar is 1.5 billion light years away I don't think it would be distorting too much for TS.
#24
You could watch it, but you would have no sound. Also, you would need a ridiculously powerful telescope.
#27
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we kinda just broke up
but i think we are trying to work things out...

i was kinda hoping someone would bring up gravity itself warping light, or the shape of light being spread out over a large area. something cool that i could look into and research... i need something interesting to research for the fun of learning something new.