#1
So I've read that lemon oil is good for the fretboard cause it prevents the wood from drying out. I believe that, but then, I've also read that lemonoil is linseed oil scented with a citrus aroma.. Now I have trouble believing this.

Another problem I've got is that in my country (Switzerland) I'm unable to find lemon oil. Guitar stores sell fretboard cleaning stuff of course but it's not lemon oil, there are other chemicals in it too.

Are these chemicalized substances for the fretboard really that much better than lemon oil?

However, if I go to Hungary the next day I can get lots of lemon oil but it's pure lemon oil so it's not from a guitar brand it's just lemon oil from a simple store.. They're not fake stuff cause they do cost much. So is the lemon oil I read about the same lemon oil I can get in the store that doesn't have any brand names such as Dunlop?
#2
You can use anything you like but be aware of what you are doing and how you should actually be doing it. Dodgey manufacturers will say stuff is lemon oil when it isn't because lemon oil was the preferred oil used to seal fingerboards going back into antiquity - so of course the pure, real thing is best.
Read this.
http://www.cumpiano.com/Home/Articles/Articles/fbrd%20oil.html
Gilchrist custom
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Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
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Cathbard Amplification
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Last edited by Cathbard at Mar 11, 2012,
#3
Quote by Cathbard
You can use anything you like but be aware of what you are doing and how you should actually be doing it. Dodgey manufacturers will say stuff is lemon oil when it isn't because lemon oil was the preferred oil used to seal fretboards going back into antiquity - so of course the pure, real thing is best.
Read this.
http://www.cumpiano.com/Home/Articles/Articles/fbrd%20oil.html


The one I've almost bought is pure lemon oil and it comes in a little plastic bottle almost like an eye dropping thing. I don't know if you know what I mean by that but it's small. So I'm guessing it's the real thing. The store I'm buying it at is an everyday kind of store so it's not special. I don't believe they'd do something with it. In Hungary lemon oil is also a common fluid for sanitizing things, removing oil stains etc..

What signs should I look for if it's not the right oil? Will it show on the fretboard right away? Or only after a few times it's been used.
#4
It doesn't really matter that much. In reality you could use turps or cooking oil. Read that article. What matters most is how you do it and how you maintain it afterwards. I'd just avoid synthetics.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#5
pure lemon oil can even be bought from hardware supply stores. if you cant get lemon oil, linseed and flax oil are very good too. the fretboard will show immediate improvement from the oil. it will get very dark and then get slightly darker each time you oil it afterwards. if you look at the link of my padauk pickguard, you can see some pics of my strat with a very dark rosewood fretboard. its an enormous difference from when it was not oiled.
Last edited by ciano16 at Mar 11, 2012,
#6
You only need to oil it once a year, or twice tops. Mostly useful on guitars that never got played much, and the rosewood is already gross. A well-maintained instrument, that gets played enough, should have enough oil on it from your hands.

I apply lemon oil about half-way through the winter months, because it gets so dry up here.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#7
I've used a lot of linseed oil on timber in the past, not just fingerboards. For a fingerboard, if I was going to use linseed oil I'd go for the boiled variety. It's just too damn hard to dress unboiled stuff from the board.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#8
Quote by Cathbard
I've used a lot of linseed oil on timber in the past, not just fingerboards. For a fingerboard, if I was going to use linseed oil I'd go for the boiled variety. It's just too damn hard to dress unboiled stuff from the board.

Good link that you've sent. How about the inlays the oils doesn't find a way to remove them eventually right?
#9
Nah, you'll be fine. Oil means nothing to a bit of abalone. Water off a duck's back.
It's not something you do all the time. You do it and then maintain it. You shouldn't have to do it again for ages. One it's sealed you then just have to keep it clean.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#10
Quote by Cathbard
Nah, you'll be fine. Oil means nothing to a bit of abalone. Water off a duck's back.
It's not something you do all the time. You do it and then maintain it. You shouldn't have to do it again for ages. One it's sealed you then just have to keep it clean.

Thanks =)
#11
I have something called Holloway House Lemon Oil and checked the label and it states "Danger: Contains Petroleum Distillates." Nothing about it containing lemon oil. It does however smell like lemons. States it's for fine wood, moisturizes & preserves. Wonder how safe that is for the fretboard.
#12
Quote by japkramernut
I have something called Holloway House Lemon Oil and checked the label and it states "Danger: Contains Petroleum Distillates." Nothing about it containing lemon oil. It does however smell like lemons. States it's for fine wood, moisturizes & preserves. Wonder how safe that is for the fretboard.


I think that's only for furnitures and not fretboards... I've read articles on how people use furniture sprays on their fretboard but that is surely one thing that's going to kill the board. So if I were you I wouldn't apply that type of Lemon Oil... Trust me on that!
#13
Alternatively, Gunstock Oil (or just Gun Oil) works as well. I've used it many times, and it's meant for the same purpose as the stuff for your frets. Alternatively, you could just buy the stuff from the guitar store that's meant for frets. They aren't going to sell you something that is bad for your frets if you go with a respected brand like Dunlop, etc. I was actually given one of their kits for Christmas a few years back, and I was surprised how much I liked it. It came with fretboard cleaner, fretboard oil, body cleaner, body wax, and string cleaner, plus two cleaning cloths. I still have all of it and use it all every time I restring, minus the oil and the wax (a little over the top if you ask me). I'll use the oil about every third or fourth restring, give or take, depending on how the frets look/feel and how often I'd been restringing. Depending on where you live and how naturally oily your skin is, you may need to oil more often or you may never need to oil. What's more important than oiling, though, is simply keeping your fretboard clean. I recommend the finest grit steel wool you can get. Go for #0000 steel wool. You should be able to get it at any hardware store, and it does an excellent job of cleaning the fretboard and keeping your frets polished. I use it in conjunction with the fret cleaner from the Dunlop set and it works wonders. I've cleaned some nasty fretboards for people, and it's never let me down. One was a Fender acoustic from the '80's that had never been cleaned, but had been played daily. Really, though, the thing I use most from the Dunlop set is the string cleaner. It actually does bring your strings back to life, to an extent. Obviously, three month old strings that are half rusted aren't going to be sounding new any time soon, but strings up to about a month old will sound a lot better after a cleaning.
#15
Quote by poppameth
Also keep in mind that Lemon oil is not to be used on Maple fretboards.
A buddy of mine uses it to clean a maple fretboard, but I won't soak in and must be wiped off. It's not going to cause any harm as maple is sealed.
#16
So I've went to Hungary and got Lemon Oil, now I'm back home and before I apply this lemon oil to my fretboard I was just wondering if there is any kind of test to see if this is the right kind of oil.

I bought it from a herb store which sells many kind of oils (Lavender, Orange, Lemon, etc...) it's not a hardware store. If this might help please let me know. Thanks
#17
Quote by Devilish Dave
So I've went to Hungary and got Lemon Oil, now I'm back home and before I apply this lemon oil to my fretboard I was just wondering if there is any kind of test to see if this is the right kind of oil.

I bought it from a herb store which sells many kind of oils (Lavender, Orange, Lemon, etc...) it's not a hardware store. If this might help please let me know. Thanks



The stuff you got probably isn't going to hurt anything.. apply it.. rub it in with your finger... wipe it down..
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
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#18
Quote by Papabear505
The stuff you got probably isn't going to hurt anything.. apply it.. rub it in with your finger... wipe it down..


Alright thanks

Just heard how different oils do different things and before I've been using some fretboard fluid but I've read in an another article that lemon oil is much better. Now I'll give it a try and we'll see in a few months...
#20
Quote by Devilish Dave
Alright thanks

Just heard how different oils do different things and before I've been using some fretboard fluid but I've read in an another article that lemon oil is much better. Now I'll give it a try and we'll see in a few months...


Keep in mind that "Lemon Oil" is more solvent than lubricant... It's meant to condition wood, while removing the gunk at the same time... the solvents evaporate quickly, leaving just the oil behind.... And if you look at the label for "Lemon Oil" that you get at a music store, there isn't much Lemon Oil in it, if any at all...

If you're that concerned about it.. go to the website of the guitar manufacturer and see what they recommend...

Quote by Quintex
I don't understand why this is tough.



We were all new at this stuff once..
I Play Guitar
Some Like it
Some don't
I don't care
Beats Workin'
OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
Last edited by Papabear505 at Mar 13, 2012,