#1
im a beginner and im interested in learning the wind cries mary or little wing by jimi hendrix. are these songs too advanced for a beginner like myself? i would like to improve on playing and strumming chords and i thought learning a hendrix song would be a good, fun start.
#2
Define beginner.

You should decide for yourself if it's on your level, otherwise I'd recommend you to play other songs, and then when you're ready, Little wing and Wind cries mary will be no problem
DeVillains!
#3
if you want an easy hendrix song purple haze is probablt one of his easiest

but im sure with a bit of practice you can get it...i cant because i cant remember the whole thing but good luck with that
#4
as long as you're in tune and familiar with all the song in it's subtleties, the sky is the limit bro. As long as you have a metronome, willpower, and a strong love for the craft
Guitars:
1997 Guild Bluesbird
Gibson Les Paul Bfg
Acoustics
Ibanez GSR200FM Bass
Amps:
Bugera V55HD w/avatar cab
Fender Champ 600 with 4 ohm cab
70s traynor 200w head with 2 9x8 cabs for bass
#5
Quote by ryanpeppers
im a beginner and im interested in learning the wind cries mary or little wing by jimi hendrix. are these songs too advanced for a beginner like myself? i would like to improve on playing and strumming chords and i thought learning a hendrix song would be a good, fun start.

To me beginner means "I've just started playing guitar"

If that's not the case then you need to tell us how long you've been playing and what you can currently play, a recording of you playing would help immensely.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#6
If you are comfortable making barre chords (and I have never seen anyone at the beginner level who is), then Wind Cries Mary is actually pretty easy. Note that you don't need to use full barres in order to play it.

Little Wing has a little more going on in it, it uses alot of hammer ons, slides, and some moveable shaped chords. This song is an excellent introduction to those wanting to get into chord melody type of playing.
I'm the only player to be sponsered by 7 guitar companies not to use their products.
#7
The important thing is to learn how to play it CORRECTLY, so look up a reliable tab, don't take any shortcuts (e.g. skipping notes, letting go of notes that are supposed to ring out, replacing barre chords and "difficult" fingerings with stuff that sounds pretty similar yet not quite the same) and just keep practicing 'em every now and then so you don't forget 'em

It really doesn't matter if you play it slowed down 10x, the point is to always have these songs available in your "queue of stuff I have to practice" just so you can pull 'em out whenever you feel like it. Focus on easier stuff in the meantime. Trust me, eventually you'll be like "okay, so I've really mastered Smoke on the Water by now and I'm kinda tired of repeating the same exercises over and over again: maybe I'll take another shot at Little Wing!"... You'll probably notice that the stuff which seemed just beyond your reach a couple of months ago suddenly appears to be pretty damn achievable!!

Thus encouraging you to practice on that song on and off for like a week until you stumble upon yet another obstacle: "damn, I can play almost halfway through the song, but that bridge is still a pain in the arse!!". No worries: this just means it's time to put the song back on the shelve and practice something else that seems more "up to your level" at this point, until you feel like having another go. Sometimes you'll feel like slaving over the same material, like when you're practicing for a performance or showcase or whatever, but when there's no motivation I would advice to save yourself some frustration because remember why you decided to pick up the guitar in the first place: because you wanted to have fun (well, that and chicks, but mostly fun)!

So that's basically it: try keeping yourself entertained by always having a bunch of songs of different difficulties (or even better: styles!) stored in the back of your mind just so you won't grow bored or frustrated. I'm always working on tons of songs at the same time: most of 'em I'll master pretty quickly, some of 'em might take me a few days and there's always like 1 or 2 really technical ones which I'll try to memorize waaay slowed down, just so I have something to grind on whenever I'm out of imagination. Some of 'em I started working on years ago and I still haven't mastered the bastards, but the cool thing is: if you haven't played 'em in a while and go back to them the progress you made will become a lot more noticeable. And nothing beats that good old "oh wow, I really HAVE gotten better" feeling

/] 三方 [\
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
#8
If you slow it down and get confident with each part before you move on to the next, neither of them should be too hard. They're a bit fiddly. Especially Little Wing. The hardest part will be getting each of your fingers to work independently of each other. Then it'd be learning how Hendrix held the chords, because he didn't just slap the whole barre chord down. He used "shortened" versions.
#9
I'll try to memorize waaay slowed down, just so I have something to grind on whenever I'm out of imagination.